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Old December 14th, 2012, 11:28 AM   #18 (permalink)
Bob Maxey
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Originally Posted by ajdroidx View Post
I used to work a local film lab at a store a couple years ago. I basically ran the place, the manager had to ask me some things at times. I enjoyed it. I even processed some tri-x film in my bathroom a couple times, I forgot what I used, I think it was Diafine or something like that. It also processed neopan.

Still have my elan 7 sitting around and some techpan in the freezer along with some velvia 50 that will likely stay there now.

I found it kind of defeated the purpose of processing your own film if you are just going to digitize them and run them through photoshop, so that experiment did not last long. It was a treat to do this though
I disagree. The quality of the negative always determines the quality of the print. These days, PS is used by many pros as a crutch. It is used to solve image issues that a good photographer would never allow to creep into their work flow.

Lots of "pros" do not know a blessed thing about photography. That said, I come from a time when professional photographers knew a few things. And I am quite bitter, too.

Yes, you can PS an image and if all you need is a decent looking print and if you can achieve the goal with digital processing, OK, that works for some people I suppose.

If you create bad negatives--either through poor photography or poor processing--your final print will lack shadow and/or highlight details and those things are vital if you want a truly great print.

Digital can help but it always comes down to the final print and your goals.

Certainly, an 8 x 10 view camera and film can create great images, but if your goal is to post images on FaceBook or eBay, it is perhaps overkill. A cheap digital camera is all you need.
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