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Old July 23rd, 2010, 08:17 AM   #1 (permalink)
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So I took a job with this company a little over a year ago that is much less responsibility and more pay plus I get to work from home and hang out with my giant dog. They pay my Internet and part of my cell phone and things are awesome.... Until last night.

My phone suddenly wanted me to create a password for exchange and I was like WTF?! I did it thinking that work was doing something lame and then I realized it wasn't just for my mail I needed a password to unlock the phone to do anything. Apparently IT department is starting new security that will make this necessary for everyone without regard for people that are on the move a lot. I never got an email that they were doing this and when I asked about it they immediately changed the policy but said it was going into effect next month.

I used to be a system admin at my last job which was in a HIPA compliant IT office. I had to sign my life away so I couldn't talk about patient information but they would never in a million years think about doing this. My current job really doesn't have secure information other than in our software which cannot be emailed anyway.

I guess what I am getting at is if any of you guys are in charge of your IT/telecom people do not institute this policy on your employees, especially when they are using their own phone.

PS once you turn on the password is there any way to turn it off?

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Old July 23rd, 2010, 08:40 AM   #2 (permalink)
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Sorry dude, if you want to access the company systems on your phone you gotta follow their policies.
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Old July 23rd, 2010, 08:43 AM   #3 (permalink)
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Sorry dude, if you want to access the company systems on your phone you gotta follow their policies.
agreed
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Old July 23rd, 2010, 08:47 AM   #4 (permalink)
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Okay, I am so confused...

Do you mean that you will now have to use a password to unlock your company related features? Such as the mail?

Or do you mean that you have to use a password to unlock anything and everything on the phone, including your apps and stuff? Cause I don't see how they can do that (as in, technically speaking... as that would require installing software on the phone remotely and being able to monitor it so you don't turn it off, which I don't think is possible).

If it's the former, that makes total sense and every company I have worked for (or have friends work for) does this! It's so that people can't pick up your phone and start messing with your company data. Or worse yet, you lose your phone and now someone has access to all that stuff.

Frankly, it's VERY smart of them to do that and I am surprised that it wasn't already in place. But good for them for finally putting it in.

I don't really see the problem... it's an extra 2 seconds to unlock and ensures that your companies information stays safe.
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Old July 23rd, 2010, 08:53 AM   #5 (permalink)
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Pretty sure the Exchange Policy's will make it so he has to have a password to unlock the phone at all. Thus protecting any company information. (calendar/mail/contacts)
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Old July 23rd, 2010, 08:59 AM   #6 (permalink)
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It requires me to enter a password to do anything on my phone not just access mail. I agree its their policy but locking the mail is one thing locking my ability to make a call is another. Hopefully they don't go ahead with it but if they do I am just going to let them buy me a phone and I'll carry 2. Sadly their company phone is an iphone or a blackjack.... UGH yuck
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Old July 23rd, 2010, 09:00 AM   #7 (permalink)
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It is the same with my company blackberry. Their policy requires an unlock PW.
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Old July 23rd, 2010, 09:00 AM   #8 (permalink)
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Pretty sure the Exchange Policy's will make it so he has to have a password to unlock the phone at all. Thus protecting any company information. (calendar/mail/contacts)
Yes, I understand that. I was wondering if he had to simply unlock the phone or if he had to also unlock each and every program separately.

I really don't see the problem, TBH. Like I said, I am surprised that they didn't have this already. While it's the "OP's Phone"... the company is helping to pay for it. And they are allowing their programs to be accessed remotely on that phone. They have to protect themselves and their company data.

If you don't want to deal with this on "your" phone, then I can only suggest that you add another line to your plan and get another phone for work purposes only.

But maybe the OP is just having a bad day and this seems like a bigger problem that it really is
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Old July 23rd, 2010, 09:03 AM   #9 (permalink)
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If you're going to store internal company information (e.g. email/contacts/calendar) you are beholden to the internal company IT policies.

I've worked in IT my whole life and I would be pissed if someone lost their phone full of internal emails and had no password on it. Security policies are there because people can't be trusted to know what is secure and what's not.

Any exchange server I've administered has had security policies in place to protect the corporate data. Devices that did not support the security profiles were not allowed to connect.

Just because it's not government mandated compliance (HIPAA) doesn't mean it's not important... and maybe it's me but I really can't see the hassle of owning/carrying/charging two phones to be easier than hitting 4 digits to unlock.
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Old July 23rd, 2010, 09:17 AM   #10 (permalink)
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NOTE: THE FOLLOWING ADVICE COULD GET YOU FIRED!!!

Lockpicker (available through the market) will circumvent your company's mobile device security policy and disable the mandatory PIN lock. The only way they'll know you did it is if they take possession of your phone.

-Mike
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Old July 23rd, 2010, 09:20 AM   #11 (permalink)
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I used to be a system admin at my last job which was in a HIPA compliant IT office. I had to sign my life away so I couldn't talk about patient information but they would never in a million years think about doing this.
Want to bet? I work in hospital IT. In order to be HIPAA compliant, this is a requirement now. Doesnt matter if its a personal device or a company device, if it stores company email it must be password protected (it has to store on the phone.. not access via webmail), and they must be able to remotely wipe the device if it is lost.
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Old July 23rd, 2010, 09:23 AM   #12 (permalink)
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I'm a sysadmin and I support a password policy. To clarify what the OP is saying, the password lock doesn't require you to enter a password every single time you try to run a program. It simply locks the phone after a predetermined time. It's the same thing you have the option of setting yourself inside the phone if you wish. The OP is just frustrated that every time his phone locks he has to put in a password. While I can relate to that, you have to realize that you do have proprietary data on your phone in terms of contacts, e-mails, calendar appointments, etc......

If I'm a company, I don't want my entire customer list to fall into the hands of someone who may not have my best interests in mind. So I'm going to enforce a security policy on every client of mine I can convince to go for it. It makes too much sense not to. If you don't want to have to unlock your phone, then you have the option to not get company e-mail on your phone.
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Old July 23rd, 2010, 09:59 AM   #13 (permalink)
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So I took a job with this company a little over a year ago that is much less responsibility and more pay plus I get to work from home and hang out with my giant dog. They pay my Internet and part of my cell phone and things are awesome.... Until last night.

My phone suddenly wanted me to create a password for exchange and I was like WTF?! I did it thinking that work was doing something lame and then I realized it wasn't just for my mail I needed a password to unlock the phone to do anything. Apparently IT department is starting new security that will make this necessary for everyone without regard for people that are on the move a lot. I never got an email that they were doing this and when I asked about it they immediately changed the policy but said it was going into effect next month.

I used to be a system admin at my last job which was in a HIPA compliant IT office. I had to sign my life away so I couldn't talk about patient information but they would never in a million years think about doing this. My current job really doesn't have secure information other than in our software which cannot be emailed anyway.

I guess what I am getting at is if any of you guys are in charge of your IT/telecom people do not institute this policy on your employees, especially when they are using their own phone.

PS once you turn on the password is there any way to turn it off?
No way to turn it off except at the Exchange Server.

Also, your old office wasn't HIPAA compliant if they didn't require you to have a password. Simple as that. Just be thankful that your employer still allows you all the control over the rest of your phone and allows you to use an Android device. A lot of my customers will only allow their employees to have access to a BES server...Wackberry only.

Be very thankful...it could be a lot worse.
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Old July 23rd, 2010, 10:24 AM   #14 (permalink)
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No way to turn it off except at the Exchange Server.

Also, your old office wasn't HIPAA compliant if they didn't require you to have a password. Simple as that. Just be thankful that your employer still allows you all the control over the rest of your phone and allows you to use an Android device. A lot of my customers will only allow their employees to have access to a BES server...Wackberry only.

Be very thankful...it could be a lot worse.

Definitely was a HIPAA compliant shop. We had BES so we ould wipe what we needed to also could change the PW if it got lost. What I meant was can I turn off the local password on my phone once it is entered. I didnt really see a way to do it but I didnt try deleting the exchange account from my phone.

I guess my deal is when im on the road. I havent tried my hands free yet but if i cant dial a client I really dont want to be one of those people typing while driving. Not a huge deal but I guess they just got on my nerves cause it came out of nowhere, no email, no call, no memo. Its their network and their info I guess moving to a much lower position than I was used to I just see what I would do differently.

Yes sort of having a bad day because verizon cant follow instructions and install a dmarc where we requested even though the guy who was on site insisted they were putting it in the wrong place. LOL! If this is the most stress I have all week I'll take it.

I just hope next time they roll this out I am told about it not flipping out because my phone was going to erase my data in 4 mor tries and me being like WTF?
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Old July 23rd, 2010, 10:26 AM   #15 (permalink)
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Doesn't "much less responsibility and more pay plus I get to work from home and hang out with my giant dog" trump having to type in a password on a phone?
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Old July 23rd, 2010, 10:36 AM   #16 (permalink)
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NOTE: THE FOLLOWING ADVICE COULD GET YOU FIRED!!!

Lockpicker (available through the market) will circumvent your company's mobile device security policy and disable the mandatory PIN lock. The only way they'll know you did it is if they take possession of your phone.

-Mike
I use this App and it works great!

If you are concerned about security and want the pattern lock remove the exchange account, verify that you nolonger need a password, create the pattern lock, add the exchange account, and install lockpicker

I believe that your employer still has right to wipe your device as a security measure...

Good Luck!
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Old July 23rd, 2010, 10:57 AM   #17 (permalink)
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Company policy for me too, the largest public accounting firm in the world.

Seems like a pretty normal thing to request, they don't want someone just coming along and picking up your phone and having easy access to your exchange server, which has the emails of the entire company on it.
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Old July 23rd, 2010, 11:10 AM   #18 (permalink)
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Life lesson:

Company owned devices are for work information, personal devices are for personal information. If they want you to have access to your company email on the road, they should provide the device.

Never EVER allow your employer to access your personal device.

Ever.
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Old July 23rd, 2010, 11:20 AM   #19 (permalink)
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Imagine what they could do in terms of looking into your personal information?

Anyways, a solution is to get a secondary phone/line that you just use for your company e-mail.

With that kind of access to your phone, they could probably look anything you've done on company time and fire you if they want. What if they bricked your phone for false reasons or looked up your call, text history.

I would have a secondary phone in a heartbeat for personal use.

Not doing so gives them lots of leverage and power over you. Don't let them have that power.
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Old July 23rd, 2010, 11:21 AM   #20 (permalink)
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Lurked around for months but first post I had to chime in on.
I set this up for myself not just because of the work information stored but if my phone was ever stolen or lost I would not want anyone to have access to anything on my phone. Just think about how much someone would know about you digging around in it. Scary.

Even the girls I date that want to use my phone I will unlock it and dial the number for them. I'm not that shady but it's my own s*** on there.(different topic on it's own)

Its bad enough the premissions that some apps use. Which is why I don't use some of them.
I am lucky that my employer is owned by my dad and don't worry to much about them accessing anything.
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Old July 23rd, 2010, 11:22 AM   #21 (permalink)
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Life lesson:

Company owned devices are for work information, personal devices are for personal information. If they want you to have access to your company email on the road, they should provide the device.

Never EVER allow your employer to access your personal device.

Ever.

Agreed - along the lines of what I was saying.
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Old July 23rd, 2010, 11:29 AM   #22 (permalink)
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So I took a job with this company a little over a year ago that is much less responsibility and more pay plus I get to work from home and hang out with my giant dog. They pay my Internet and part of my cell phone and things are awesome.... Until last night.

My phone suddenly wanted me to create a password for exchange and I was like WTF?! I did it thinking that work was doing something lame and then I realized it wasn't just for my mail I needed a password to unlock the phone to do anything. Apparently IT department is starting new security that will make this necessary for everyone without regard for people that are on the move a lot. I never got an email that they were doing this and when I asked about it they immediately changed the policy but said it was going into effect next month.

I used to be a system admin at my last job which was in a HIPA compliant IT office. I had to sign my life away so I couldn't talk about patient information but they would never in a million years think about doing this. My current job really doesn't have secure information other than in our software which cannot be emailed anyway.

I guess what I am getting at is if any of you guys are in charge of your IT/telecom people do not institute this policy on your employees, especially when they are using their own phone.

PS once you turn on the password is there any way to turn it off?
I had the same problem...download an app called lockpicker..it'll solve all your problems
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Old July 23rd, 2010, 12:01 PM   #23 (permalink)
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Imagine what they could do in terms of looking into your personal information?

Anyways, a solution is to get a secondary phone/line that you just use for your company e-mail.

With that kind of access to your phone, they could probably look anything you've done on company time and fire you if they want. What if they bricked your phone for false reasons or looked up your call, text history.

I would have a secondary phone in a heartbeat for personal use.

Not doing so gives them lots of leverage and power over you. Don't let them have that power.
No, they can't, at least not on a non-blackberry phone.

What they can do is require that your device has it's PIN lock feature turned on in order for you to access company mail. They cannot read your phone.

However, they can initiate a remote wipe of your phone if it is tied in to their Exchange server. Since we are talking about Android phones, I'm sure there are apps that can be used to prevent this feature from actually happening on your phone, just like the one that will bypass the PIN requirement. Of course if they ever found out, they'd likely not allow your device to access mail anymore, and may even try to wipe it (or tell you to so you don't get fired).

Incidentally, at my current job I set up the Exchange environment before I moved to a different department, and I made sure that my account was listed as an exception to these security requirements
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Old July 23rd, 2010, 12:11 PM   #24 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by callmeox View Post
Life lesson:

Company owned devices are for work information, personal devices are for personal information. If they want you to have access to your company email on the road, they should provide the device.

Never EVER allow your employer to access your personal device.

Ever.
This. Period.
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Old July 23rd, 2010, 12:12 PM   #25 (permalink)
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No, they can't, at least not on a non-blackberry phone.

What they can do is require that your device has it's PIN lock feature turned on in order for you to access company mail. They cannot read your phone.

However, they can initiate a remote wipe of your phone if it is tied in to their Exchange server. Since we are talking about Android phones, I'm sure there are apps that can be used to prevent this feature from actually happening on your phone, just like the one that will bypass the PIN requirement. Of course if they ever found out, they'd likely not allow your device to access mail anymore, and may even try to wipe it (or tell you to so you don't get fired).

Incidentally, at my current job I set up the Exchange environment before I moved to a different department, and I made sure that my account was listed as an exception to these security requirements

Ah! Good to know. I was gonna say.. if they did have access to all of your personal information it would seem like an invasion of privacy.
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Old July 23rd, 2010, 12:30 PM   #26 (permalink)
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The Exchange lock is already on the phone and is activated when you activate your exchange account if that security protocol is activated by your company. It's not a big deal you baby. Just make your password 0000 or space space space space so it's easy to login. That or lockpicker and you are done.

If your company is going to give you remote access to your email then they have the right to know it's secure if you lose your phone or something.

I had my DINC connecting to our Exchange but it's not an approved device yet so I got an email to deactivate it until it was approved. It has remote wipe so I hope to be able to use it pretty soon once they do testing but with the information that I can and do get in my emails I doubt it will be this year.
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Old July 23rd, 2010, 12:35 PM   #27 (permalink)
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Doesn't "much less responsibility and more pay plus I get to work from home and hang out with my giant dog" trump having to type in a password on a phone?
Seriously, if that is your biggest problem consider yourself a lucky SOB.
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Old July 23rd, 2010, 12:48 PM   #28 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by callmeox View Post
Life lesson:

Company owned devices are for work information, personal devices are for personal information. If they want you to have access to your company email on the road, they should provide the device.

Never EVER allow your employer to access your personal device.

Ever.
I generally agree with this. At my office I'm given a choice of a company phone or a phone I pick that they then re-imburse me for. I picked the latter. Most of my co-workers pick the former. They see it as they are getting a free phone that they then use for personal use in their off-work time. I see it that my boss could walk up to me right now, fire me for posting on forums when I should be working and demand my phone. He now has access to all my personal contacts, personal e-mail, files I've got there, etc..... No thanks. My employer doesn't give us e-mail on our phones anyway as he feels that a computer tech with e-mail on their phones makes them less effective.

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No, they can't, at least not on a non-blackberry phone.

What they can do is require that your device has it's PIN lock feature turned on in order for you to access company mail. They cannot read your phone.

However, they can initiate a remote wipe of your phone if it is tied in to their Exchange server. Since we are talking about Android phones, I'm sure there are apps that can be used to prevent this feature from actually happening on your phone, just like the one that will bypass the PIN requirement. Of course if they ever found out, they'd likely not allow your device to access mail anymore, and may even try to wipe it (or tell you to so you don't get fired).

Incidentally, at my current job I set up the Exchange environment before I moved to a different department, and I made sure that my account was listed as an exception to these security requirements
Everything here is correct. Using Exchange you can remotely wipe a device and you can enforce a PIN. If you bypass these settings they can terminate you.

Making yourself exempt from the security requirements I think is a BS move, but that's just my opinion.

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Not doing so gives them lots of leverage and power over you. Don't let them have that power.
I tend to agree with this. I know a guy who hired on here and ported his phone number to the company phone. I've told him before that I think that's just stupid. The company now owns not just his phone, but his number as well. I told him the other day that if he ever leaves the company, he's at the mercy of the company as to whether he gets his phone number back or not. His plan is to just throw a fit if that happens until they give him his phone number back. To me, this is a stupid plan.
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Old July 23rd, 2010, 12:51 PM   #29 (permalink)
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I guess my deal is when im on the road. I havent tried my hands free yet but if i cant dial a client I really dont want to be one of those people typing while driving. Not a huge deal but I guess they just got on my nerves cause it came out of nowhere, no email, no call, no memo. Its their network and their info I guess moving to a much lower position than I was used to I just see what I would do differently.
Bolding is mine...

You shouldn't be texting OR talking while you are driving! Period. End of story. In some states it's even illegal, even with a BT device.

I am amused, and concerned , that you are okay with the distraction of taking a business call while you are trying to pay attention to the road but you are "concerned" by the 2 seconds it will take to enter a passcode.

Oh yea... and I'm that bitch that will call the "how's my driving" number on people's trucks when I see a driver talking on his cell while using a company car. That's how strongly I feel about it.
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Old July 23rd, 2010, 12:53 PM   #30 (permalink)
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With that kind of access to your phone, they could probably look anything you've done on company time and fire you if they want. What if they bricked your phone for false reasons or looked up your call, text history.
Yeah, to clarify what was said above, this is only a security policy. It's not any kind of nefarious snooping or app installed on your phone that gives them control. It's compliance built into the operating system to allow these features, so by the same token, remote snooping is not built into the operating system.

About the only thing that can be used for snooping is if you are forced to be logged into a VPN. In that situation, traffic is traveling over the company's servers so they can snoop your traffic if they want.

I would, however, make sure to keep religious backups of your phone with the capacity for remote (or too many incorrect passwords) wipe installed. Wouldn't it be fun to find out that your phone woke up in your pocket and you managed to dial 5 incorrect passwords with your thigh?

edit: also, don't work around the security restrictions. First off, it's not worth your job if they find out. Second of all, if you lost your phone and someone gleaned company information from it, you may be held liable.
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Old July 23rd, 2010, 12:55 PM   #31 (permalink)
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Bolding is mine...

You shouldn't be texting OR talking while you are driving! Period. End of story. In some states it's even illegal, even with a BT device.
Just my opinion, but that is excessive. What's the difference between talking to someone on a handsfree device and talking to someone in your passenger seat? It's actually safer to use handsfree because people tend to look over at their passenger while talking taking their eyes off the road. Next it'll be mandatory to put up privacy glass and sound deadening between you and everyone else in your car.
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Old July 23rd, 2010, 01:06 PM   #32 (permalink)
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Next it'll be mandatory to put up privacy glass and sound deadening between you and everyone else in your car.
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Old July 23rd, 2010, 01:27 PM   #33 (permalink)
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edit: also, don't work around the security restrictions. First off, it's not worth your job if they find out. Second of all, if you lost your phone and someone gleaned company information from it, you may be held liable.
These are very good points. In the second case you'd probably be fired and you'd be held liable for the information lost. You could cost yourself a job and thousands of dollars.
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Old July 23rd, 2010, 02:25 PM   #34 (permalink)
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Old July 23rd, 2010, 03:26 PM   #35 (permalink)
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Life lesson:

Company owned devices are for work information, personal devices are for personal information. If they want you to have access to your company email on the road, they should provide the device.

Never EVER allow your employer to access your personal device.

Ever.

being a guy stuck with a Tmob BB from work I'll disagree. I'll gladly take the corporate security on my phone in order to have 1 device as long as they don't make it so you can't add apps etc. PAssword and remote wipes not a big deal.

For the first 8 months I was here I had corp email on my personal BB and it was great, Last summer when they required corp owned devices and Tmob ones at that pissed me off.
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Old July 23rd, 2010, 03:39 PM   #36 (permalink)
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Just my opinion, but that is excessive. What's the difference between talking to someone on a handsfree device and talking to someone in your passenger seat? ...
Not much, really. In reality it's distractions that cause accidents, not just phones. I've seen cases where a conversation causes the driver to lose focus on the road just as much as looking down at one's phone would.

That said, many of us have learned to carry on a conversation without looking directly at the person we're talking to. It's hard to say the same thing about dialing a phone or sending a text. And while hands-free devices would seem to be the answer, it will take generations for humans to be as efficient at using those to dial a number without looking as we are with chatting with someone a mere 3' away.
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Old July 23rd, 2010, 03:49 PM   #37 (permalink)
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Before I got an Android phone, I had a windows Mobile phone. The exchange server I used required a medium level of security: remote wipe was enabled, and a PIN was required to access the phone if it was locked. However, the phone/security settings as dictated by the exchange server allowed the USER to dictate how frequently the PIN had to be entered. I was able set a time on my WM phone that said that after 4 hours of non-use, that a PIN would be required, or if I intentionally locked the phone.

When I switched to my dinc, with the same exchange server, I was unable to specify a time to lock the phone. I was very frustrated that every time I wanted to make a call, or check something on the phone, that I had to unlock it. This behavior was beyond the requirements set by the sysadmin of the exchange server. Android's support of exchange server is still being developed, and it doesn't have all of the options available that it could.

If I hadn't found a way around the constant pin requirement (lockpicker) then the phone would have been going back.
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Old July 23rd, 2010, 05:50 PM   #38 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by Terabethia View Post
Bolding is mine...

You shouldn't be texting OR talking while you are driving! Period. End of story. In some states it's even illegal, even with a BT device.

I am amused, and concerned , that you are okay with the distraction of taking a business call while you are trying to pay attention to the road but you are "concerned" by the 2 seconds it will take to enter a passcode.

Oh yea... and I'm that bitch that will call the "how's my driving" number on people's trucks when I see a driver talking on his cell while using a company car. That's how strongly I feel about it.
Not illegal in NY to talk on a hands free and I am responsible enough to do that. I think you may be mistaken otherwise ford sync wouldnt exist nor would any similiar in car factory installed hands free system. And while im on the job I will answer client calls when driving, i dont look away from the road ever unless im checking a blind spot or a mirror. Those are completely different leves of distraction... At least they are for a responsible driver which I can't speak for everyone.
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Old July 23rd, 2010, 07:50 PM   #39 (permalink)
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Not much, really. In reality it's distractions that cause accidents, not just phones. I've seen cases where a conversation causes the driver to lose focus on the road just as much as looking down at one's phone would.

That said, many of us have learned to carry on a conversation without looking directly at the person we're talking to. It's hard to say the same thing about dialing a phone or sending a text. And while hands-free devices would seem to be the answer, it will take generations for humans to be as efficient at using those to dial a number without looking as we are with chatting with someone a mere 3' away.
You would not want to drive with me then. I spent 6 years as a 911 dispatcher and had to spend 8-12 hours a day talking on the phone, the radio and with another person next to me all the same time. I drive around talking on the phone, fiddling with the radio and shoving crappy fast food in my mouth while planning my next stop of the day all at the same time. I haven't been in an accident that was my fault in more than 10 years.
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Old January 5th, 2011, 02:25 PM   #40 (permalink)
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I have this same thing on my phone but it has to be an 8 digit code and it has to have letters and numbers. It’s my personal phone, the company does not pay for it in any way and I feel it’s a bit of invasion of my personal belongings that they enforce this.

I think working for a bank as a mortgage LO the biggest thing they don’t want people to get is my contacts. Not that there is any real info for people on it anyway it’s just a name and a phone number in most cases but they are MY clients NOT the banks anyway. So it really pisses me off that they could wipe the phone. I do back up my client list to Excel every now and again (reminds me I need to do that now) so that if they do wipe my phone they don’t take all my personal contacts with it.

When I went from my old company to my new company my old company had this same policy though I only had a 4 digit number I had to enter so it was a little less of a hassle but when I went to link up to my new company my phone wiped, and not just the company info but EVERYTHING on the phone including all my pictures and everything. That I find to be TOTAL BS!!! Luckily I had backed up my contact list just before in the event something like this happened.

I am very intrigued about this Lockpicker app. I’ll be downloading it as soon as I’m done with this thread. Does anyone know if it disables their ability to wipe the phone as well?

Terabethia just because you’re incapable (as many others) of talking and driving doesn’t mean others aren’t. So you’re telling me when you have a passenger you tell them they must be silent while you drive? Well some of us can chew bubble gum and walk at the same time. Others…well go join Opra in her idealistic, un-realistic, sheltered world. The part I will agree with is people, like you, who I see talking/texting on the phone, swerving between lanes, not using their turn signals should be pulled over and ticketed or called in. If you are capable of driving properly then it doesn’t bother me.


I just went to look up Lockpicker and it says it doesn't work on 2.2. Does anyone know if this has been updated at all yet? I was all excited there for a minute!
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Old June 1st, 2012, 05:07 AM   #41 (permalink)
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You can consider products like Divide by Enterproid which creates a separate, secure work profile on your device which you can use to check work email and perform other business activities. The exchange password policy will be limited to logging into the work profile only rather than the entire phone. Also if your company ever needs to wipe your phone, they can only do so to your work profile and your personal data will be safe.
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Old August 4th, 2012, 06:34 PM   #42 (permalink)
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Yeah. Just set the password however you want it. Like do the drawing one, and draw a house. Something simple.
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