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Old November 16th, 2009, 06:16 AM   #51 (permalink)
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I have run ATM and TasKiller (pro). Of the two I prefer TasKiller Pro.

I have run the system with it for 3 days and without it for 3 days. I am a heavy data user and have about 8 email accts syncing to it. I use messaging for both sms & mms. I use Pandora all the time. I make phone calls. I stay on the phone an average of about 2-3 hours a day due to work and some personal calls.

I take pics with it and send it. Even made a 83+ meg video of my son's case being cut off.

I cant tell a difference in battery life by keeping apps killed and just letting them run.

This is a linux based OS and I have been running linux off and on as a hobby OS since mid 90's I am not a linux guru but I do know that I dont have to manage the apps that run on it like I do windows.

I do know that Android handles its resources far better than WinMo, Symbian OS, and BB (Java is just bloated anyways).

I will keep TasKiller installed but not running just to kill an app with one to clicks instead of many by going into settings and such.

Everybody will believe what they will and want and will not listen to others unless they want to. But as an avid tech geek and being in the IT world for some time and having a logical overview of technology.

I say trying to keep every little single app killed on the Android is a bit silly. You will make yourself believe that it is helping you. Even if you have all 256 megs of storage used for apps and what not I doubt you will see a huge improvement on performance.

But to each is to their own on this and enjoy your device how you want to.

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Old November 16th, 2009, 06:47 AM   #52 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by Nicks88 View Post
Here is a good read about the need/lack of need to kill apps on another forum. Hope this clears some stuff up. PLEASE READ: Do NOT worry about Apps running in the Background - Droid Forum - Verizon Droid & the Motorola Droid Forum

EDIT: Skip to page 3 on that thread. The first post on that page is the meat and potatoes and explains a lot.
alright... you sold me enough to give it a try....


EDIT: only been 5 minutes, so nothing conclusive... but I did notice my window shades going MUCH faster immediately after uninstalling ATK......
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Old November 16th, 2009, 06:51 AM   #53 (permalink)
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and I assume at this point in the thread that everyone knows there is a task killer built into the OS already if you want to/have to kill a task?
J.
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Old November 16th, 2009, 06:57 AM   #54 (permalink)
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so then I am curious - which specific apps do you kill on occasion to improve your battery life?

I'm trying to find the happy medium between killing everything (former windows user) and killing nothing....
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Old November 16th, 2009, 07:49 AM   #55 (permalink)
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It would be interesting to see real world battery tests on whether closing apps saves more battery life then not closing. I'm not talking about the I "feel" it saves battery test. I mean actual quantifiable testing.

I'm willing to bet that less is saved then people think.
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Old November 16th, 2009, 07:56 AM   #56 (permalink)
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I'm done with the battery tests but I stopped using a task killer several days ago. If anything, I get more battery life due to killing the never ending need to check what is running and close it (OCD). Sorry but it seems like these apps are just snake oil or they provide too little benefit to even worry about.
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Old November 16th, 2009, 08:37 AM   #57 (permalink)
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I've been using Android for about 7-8 months now and I can say for sure that using a task killer does not help, one exception is for certain app's that might have been poorly written and are using resources when they shouldn't be. Ask almost any long time G1 user about task killer apps, they will tell you it is a waste of time. You wind up doing more harm then good because Android is designed to appropriate resources to apps you are actually using, and when you leave a app it is usually sleeping in the background. Like I said there are some exceptions but really all you need to do is go to menu>settings>applications>running services and close whatever you think shouldn't be open.
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Old November 16th, 2009, 09:27 AM   #58 (permalink)
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My own personal experience has been that killing open apps (except for those I want to keep open) will increase the speed and responsiveness of the phone noticeably. Whenever the phone feels slow, I'll kill all apps outside of my exclusion list, and it will feel snappier immediately.

Just my personal experience
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Old November 16th, 2009, 09:55 AM   #59 (permalink)
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I mean the quantifiable results are this, after using my phone for several hours, I have about 20-30mb of Memory left and close to 20 apps running. I use advanced task killer free (which kills itself when killing other tasks). I have a few apps on the ignore list which it'll never kill, but after killing everything else I don't need running (games, soc network apps, etc), I usually end up with close to 70mb of Memory. I realize that these apps won't slow the processor down as they're not (or shouldn't be) doing much... but its RAM people... these apps are already preloaded which'll save you the 2 seconds it takes to load them up at the cost of RAM. I'm sure if I were to get down to 5mb of RAM - I would have some problems...

I can see how people not understanding the difference between ram and cpu getting confused and not grasping the effects of keeping all your apps open all the time...

On another note, the automatic task killers do slow down your phones (it's like an anti-virus, it's always doing something) so I recommend just using advanced task killer free and running it after ~2 of regular use. Those that don't use task killer apps will start to notice sluggishness as more cool apps come out and you download them. Keep in mind, that most apps today are made for lesser Android systems, once the more complex, more robust ones come out, they'll use more resources (including RAM while sitting in idle)
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Old November 16th, 2009, 10:26 AM   #60 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by koticphreak View Post
I realize that these apps won't slow the processor down as they're not (or shouldn't be) doing much... but its RAM people... these apps are already preloaded which'll save you the 2 seconds it takes to load them up at the cost of RAM.
Exactly.

The entire purpose of RAM is to hold stuff for quick access. People just don't seem to realize that empty RAM is useless RAM.

The best analogy would be keeping food in your pantry for quick access. The pantry is RAM. Retrieving food from your pantry is nice and quick, but getting food to the pantry from the store (SD card or other semi-permanent storage) takes time. The optimal thing to do is to keep the pantry filled close to capacity.

Running a task killer is essentially taking the entire contents of your pantry back to the store for a refund, only to have to drive back and re-purchase your food (one meal at a time) when you're ready to eat.
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Old November 16th, 2009, 11:02 AM   #61 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by Fazed View Post
The best analogy would be keeping food in your pantry for quick access. The pantry is RAM. Retrieving food from your pantry is nice and quick, but getting food to the pantry from the store (SD card or other semi-permanent storage) takes time. The optimal thing to do is to keep the pantry filled close to capacity.
Right, but you always want a decent amount of free space, because if you happen to go buy a few things, you have no pantry space to put it
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Old November 16th, 2009, 11:09 AM   #62 (permalink)
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App/memory usage
YouTube - Androidology - Part 2 of 3 - Application Lifecycle
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Old November 16th, 2009, 11:43 AM   #63 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by Fazed View Post
The best analogy would be keeping food in your pantry for quick access. The pantry is RAM. Retrieving food from your pantry is nice and quick, but getting food to the pantry from the store (SD card or other semi-permanent storage) takes time. The optimal thing to do is to keep the pantry filled close to capacity.

Running a task killer is essentially taking the entire contents of your pantry back to the store for a refund, only to have to drive back and re-purchase your food (one meal at a time) when you're ready to eat.
That's a weak analogy.

Taking things back to the store would be like uninstalling apps (we'd have to go back to the market to get those apps again). It's more like choosing to put food back in the pantry, as opposed to leaving it on the kitchen table. If I'm eating cereal, then I may keep the box next to me on the table, because I may want more. But when I'm through, and I know I'm through, I'd rather put that cereal back in the pantry. Sure, it'll take longer to go all the way to the pantry to get more cereal when I want more cereal, but if that's not going to happen until tomorrow morning, I don't want that box of cereal taking up space on my kitchen table...especially when lunch and dinner come around and I'll need to make room for the sandwiches and steaks.

I likes a clean kitchen
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Old November 16th, 2009, 12:03 PM   #64 (permalink)
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Taking things back to the store would be like uninstalling apps (we'd have to go back to the market to get those apps again). It's more like choosing to put food back in the pantry, as opposed to leaving it on the kitchen table. If I'm eating cereal, then I may keep the box next to me on the table, because I may want more. But when I'm through, and I know I'm through, I'd rather put that cereal back in the pantry. Sure, it'll take longer to go all the way to the pantry to get more cereal when I want more cereal, but if that's not going to happen until tomorrow morning, I don't want that box of cereal taking up space on my kitchen table...especially when lunch and dinner come around and I'll need to make room for the sandwiches and steaks.

I likes a clean kitchen
I agree, better analogy
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Old November 16th, 2009, 12:19 PM   #65 (permalink)
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All I know is that since I installed TasKiller and have shut down everything except my email and messaging during the day while I am in the office at my PC, I have extended the battery life by more than 4 hours.

In the background I had the following running:
Weather Widget
FaceBook
twitter
Camera
GPS/Maps
Uploader
Calendar
Bluetooth
WiFi
etc...

Now I can actually get the phone through an entire day (7:00 to ~10:00) on a charge...

So, OP... I not only call bullshlt, but call you pretty presumptuous for titling your thread, "The Truth"...
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Old November 16th, 2009, 12:26 PM   #66 (permalink)
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If I'm eating cereal, then I may keep the box next to me on the table, because I may want more. But when I'm through, and I know I'm through, I'd rather put that cereal back in the pantry.
If I know that everything I'm going to eat for the rest of the day will comfortably fit on the table, what motivation do I have for taking the cereal back to the pantry?

Incidentally, this is also my philosophy with making my bed. Unless I'm having company over that I want to impress, I see no point in doing something that yields no benefit, and that is subsequently going to be undone.

To dispense with the analogies, the only time you benefit from killing tasks is if the RAM is so full that the OS is having to flush out old apps as you bring new ones into RAM. And even then, the time it takes you to run the task killer is probably greater than the amount of time it takes the OS to automatically swap out stale apps.

Using a task killer just seems misguided. It's a case where the solution really is worse than the (presumed) problem.
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Old November 16th, 2009, 02:19 PM   #67 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by Fazed View Post
The entire purpose of RAM is to hold stuff for quick access. People just don't seem to realize that empty RAM is useless RAM.

The best analogy would be keeping food in your pantry for quick access. The pantry is RAM. Retrieving food from your pantry is nice and quick, but getting food to the pantry from the store (SD card or other semi-permanent storage) takes time. The optimal thing to do is to keep the pantry filled close to capacity.

Running a task killer is essentially taking the entire contents of your pantry back to the store for a refund, only to have to drive back and re-purchase your food (one meal at a time) when you're ready to eat.
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Right, but you always want a decent amount of free space, because if you happen to go buy a few things, you have no pantry space to put it
This is an important point.

When you run out of RAM in a normal UNIX/Linux system, least recently used memory from sleeping apps gets moved into swap space to make room for things that need more RAM. Code from sleeping executables can be paged out to avoid using swap but it's the same basic idea. Stacks/heaps and any other dynamic memory pages will still have to go to swap though. This is all painfully slow and should be avoided when possible. I'm not sure if Android uses a swap device. If it doesn't then when you run out, then you're just plain out. You'll need to shut some things down before you can run something else.

I think that some people are trying to over-simplify this issue. That leads to bad over-generalizing conclusions.
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Old November 16th, 2009, 02:45 PM   #68 (permalink)
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To dispense with the analogies, the only time you benefit from killing tasks is if the RAM is so full that the OS is having to flush out old apps as you bring new ones into RAM. And even then, the time it takes you to run the task killer is probably greater than the amount of time it takes the OS to automatically swap out stale apps.

Using a task killer just seems misguided. It's a case where the solution really is worse than the (presumed) problem.
Android apps should come with exit buttons. I like the idea of multitasking, but only if I want to multitask...I should be able to close programs that I'm not using. It's like having a computer but not being able to close out of programs.
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Old November 16th, 2009, 02:55 PM   #69 (permalink)
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My personal favorite is all the "memory" information in most task killers. I commonly see a giant list of apps running, each using slightly over 17MB of memory. Of course if you kill one, you only get a few kilobytes back, not 17MB. Why? Because it's mostly shared memory, i.e., every single app is sharing almost all of that 17MB, most apps probably have 1-2MB of data at most. Things like the JVM code are included in that 17MB, even though only one copy of that data actually has been written to memory, and is shared amongst all applications.

If you find you're experiencing poor battery life due to running applications, find out which applications are doing it. Don't kill them, uninstall them, and send the developer a message about it. Check the battery usage application.

I do like the idea of having a task killer to stop bad/broken applications though. If the problem is a consistent one, my next step tends to be to uninstall the app though.
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Old November 16th, 2009, 05:57 PM   #70 (permalink)
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My own personal experience has been that killing open apps (except for those I want to keep open) will increase the speed and responsiveness of the phone noticeably. Whenever the phone feels slow, I'll kill all apps outside of my exclusion list, and it will feel snappier immediately.

Just my personal experience
I can attest to that...


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Originally Posted by rawness View Post
That's a weak analogy.

Taking things back to the store would be like uninstalling apps (we'd have to go back to the market to get those apps again). It's more like choosing to put food back in the pantry, as opposed to leaving it on the kitchen table. If I'm eating cereal, then I may keep the box next to me on the table, because I may want more. But when I'm through, and I know I'm through, I'd rather put that cereal back in the pantry. Sure, it'll take longer to go all the way to the pantry to get more cereal when I want more cereal, but if that's not going to happen until tomorrow morning, I don't want that box of cereal taking up space on my kitchen table...especially when lunch and dinner come around and I'll need to make room for the sandwiches and steaks.

I likes a clean kitchen
EXCELLENT ANALOGY, also you gotta hate those apps (iTap,corporate calendar I don't use,MySpace) That just magically end up on the kitchen counter even when you put them away.... I'd rather have a few second delay when starting an app as opposed to a laggy navigation due to excessive apps taking up all the RAM....
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Old November 16th, 2009, 06:05 PM   #71 (permalink)
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Ive had about 5 different people tell me that Android is very similar to Linux and it uses resources differently than window, the apps show up as running but it's in stand by( not slowing down the OS),
I'm not so sure this is true. Any linux app will still have space in memory if it's open. Perhaps there's a command, like "nice" on linux, that gives it a VERY low priority so it's almost frozen.

I'd be interested in more of this memory management, especially in the server segment.
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Old November 16th, 2009, 06:07 PM   #72 (permalink)
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This is an important point.

When you run out of RAM in a normal UNIX/Linux system, least recently used memory from sleeping apps gets moved into swap space to make room for things that need more RAM. Code from sleeping executables can be paged out to avoid using swap but it's the same basic idea. Stacks/heaps and any other dynamic memory pages will still have to go to swap though. This is all painfully slow and should be avoided when possible. I'm not sure if Android uses a swap device. If it doesn't then when you run out, then you're just plain out. You'll need to shut some things down before you can run something else.

I think that some people are trying to over-simplify this issue. That leads to bad over-generalizing conclusions.
See my comment above. If the app or the wrapper can do this, then it's the answer we are all in search of!

However even running apps can swap if their code is poor.

Is there a shell for the droid OS (android 2.0) yet?
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Old November 16th, 2009, 08:20 PM   #73 (permalink)
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Task killer apps are not needed with android operating system.
I picked up my droid off the desk this afternoon and it was warm to touch...which has not happened to me before. The battery meter on my home screen informed me that within the past 30 minutes, battery had gone from 60% to 30%. I also noticed that the GUI was _very_ sluggish. I checked running tasks (via task mgr) and found an app (pocket auctions) was running 80% CPU. I had been using it earlier...but had moved on to something else. I tried bringing up the app and then returning back to the home screen, but that didn't help. I killed the task and everything was back to normal. For an OS without "close" buttons in the apps...I think it may, unfortunately, be necessary.
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Old November 16th, 2009, 09:03 PM   #74 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by CRPercodani View Post
I've been using Android for about 7-8 months now and I can say for sure that using a task killer does not help, one exception is for certain app's that might have been poorly written and are using resources when they shouldn't be. Ask almost any long time G1 user about task killer apps, they will tell you it is a waste of time. You wind up doing more harm then good because Android is designed to appropriate resources to apps you are actually using, and when you leave a app it is usually sleeping in the background. Like I said there are some exceptions but really all you need to do is go to menu>settings>applications>running services and close whatever you think shouldn't be open.


You hit the nail on the head. Thank you
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Old November 16th, 2009, 09:03 PM   #75 (permalink)
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I am on the fence w this one.....interesting topic
BTW I installed pkt eBay recently also.....will have to keep an eye on it.....
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Old November 16th, 2009, 09:04 PM   #76 (permalink)
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I picked up my droid off the desk this afternoon and it was warm to touch...which has not happened to me before. The battery meter on my home screen informed me that within the past 30 minutes, battery had gone from 60% to 30%. I also noticed that the GUI was _very_ sluggish. I checked running tasks (via task mgr) and found an app (pocket auctions) was running 80% CPU. I had been using it earlier...but had moved on to something else. I tried bringing up the app and then returning back to the home screen, but that didn't help. I killed the task and everything was back to normal. For an OS without "close" buttons in the apps...I think it may, unfortunately, be necessary.

See 2 posts above, that app should be uninstalled from you phone because it's improperly using CPU time on your phone.
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Old November 16th, 2009, 09:18 PM   #77 (permalink)
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I picked up my droid off the desk this afternoon and it was warm to touch...which has not happened to me before. The battery meter on my home screen informed me that within the past 30 minutes, battery had gone from 60% to 30%. I also noticed that the GUI was _very_ sluggish. I checked running tasks (via task mgr) and found an app (pocket auctions) was running 80% CPU. I had been using it earlier...but had moved on to something else. I tried bringing up the app and then returning back to the home screen, but that didn't help. I killed the task and everything was back to normal. For an OS without "close" buttons in the apps...I think it may, unfortunately, be necessary.
because that piece of crap app froze and locked up your cpu? sounds like the apps fault
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Old November 16th, 2009, 10:15 PM   #78 (permalink)
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You hit the nail on the head. Thank you
Okay, I get that, but without a task manager app will you know just from services alone which app is sucking up your memory? It seems to me that would be the sole good reason to have it.

Also, it appears there are two different conversations going that mix and mingle and get all jangled up in this thread. The first is that some people believe that having too many apps kills the battery quickly and others who feel that too many apps sucks up too much memory and makes the phone sluggish.

From everything I've seen and read, it does not appear that any apps really affect battery life to any great extent, unless perhaps you've got a buggy one. At the same time that buggy one will also affect your memory management.

Perhaps, people also think they're gaining battery life by killing tasks when in actuality, because these are new phones, it's been the draining and recharging of their batteries that has increased the battery life.

Three truths seem to hold for battery life. That beautiful, beautiful screen sucks up the most from your battery. Learn to tone it down when you can. Second, your battery needs to be fully discharged and fully recharged at least once to gain its maximum life. And, lastly, you can get a buggy phone that doesn't respond to either of those two situations, but that's the key. You need to see its response to the first two.

Ah wait, there's one more battery drainer possibility, but with Verizon's great coverage it seems to be far, far less of an issue. Any time your phone or any cell phone can't find service, it will rapidly drain your battery looking for it as well as heat up your phone to hot, hot, hot.

In a world dominated by PCs, it's no wonder that the majority assume that background apps are using up too much memory, but this ain't your grandfather's Windows, is it?
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Old November 16th, 2009, 11:15 PM   #79 (permalink)
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How can you tell in task manager which apps are sucking cpu? Maybe I'm blind or dumb (I'm not usually, but in this case maybe! LOL), but I couldn't figure it out.

I can see it tells me how much cpu is being used, but I don't see where I can see which app(s) are using it as the only list I see is alphabetical.
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Old November 17th, 2009, 01:32 AM   #80 (permalink)
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Default Can you handle the truth? (zombies, forced exit, killing tasks)

GNU's procps/top is an incredibly full-featured, indespensible system monitoring package in the Linux world.

One of the capabilities of top is to send a signal to a process. Send signal 1 and, if the program was written to cooperate, it will re-initialize itself. Send signal 15 and you're asking an app to clean-up and exit. Signal 9 is intercepted by the kernel and a process exit is "forced."

All of those task list/manage/kill apps are derivitive of that original top application.

Stopping a process (signal 15) is usually harmless, at worst leaving behind temporary files or failing to save its persistent state/configuration. But forcing a process to close (signal 9) should be a last resort, used only after you're certain that waiting is hopeless. It usually just "kills" the process with no ill-effects, but sometimes it will create a "zombie" which can make it impossible to fully restart the app until the OS is restarted.

A zombie's inablility to die may impede an app's ability to restart, properly control itself or communicate with its sister processes. More commonly the process header, the IO data structures, device hardware and/or interprocess communication "protocols" can become deadlocked, wasting system resources (kernel data structures, memory, VM). In some cases this "corruption" can result in runaway processes or an anomolous SW/HW state that could drain the battery at an accellerated rate. In all cases these problems can be cleaned-up by a reboot.
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How can you tell in task manager which apps are sucking cpu?
Android Market has a free application named "top" that was no-doubt inspired by its big brother. It though is a simple process list sorted by the CPU% column. Its other columns may give you a hint at the resources allocated to the dormant processes no longer being used. Those resources are saving the exact state of the application. It makes the app available more quickly as it's already initialized/running.

SO a dormant process is not using CPU time, and the fact that it is using memory (real or virtual) is not a hinderance to overall performance because the kernel and its system processes know how to reduce most of the footprint of the dormant processes when resources run short.

So if the OS can reduce the real-memory footprint of dormant apps, what's the benefit to killing them? Just as the amount of RAM (real-memory) on the device is finite, so too is the swap file space (virtual-memory) and kernel data structures (process slots, open files, IO buffers). If your swap file is full you would get an "out of memory" message and applications will fail or refuse to start. Also, anytime any of the system resources is nearly exhausted the allocation of that resource is slower and will kick-in "garbage colection" routines more often.

But still the user does not need to kill the process. The Android OS will kill the older, dormant processes as necessary to recover system resources as needed.

Normally in Linux, if you get "out of memory" failures you may want to kill some processes. In Android we should not get "out of memory." If you do, the "Home" or the OS "ROM" is buggy. If you get "out of memory" or "Force close" prompts or recognize a pattern of poor performance, you may be able to figure out an app to avoid. And then there's always my favorite system management saw, "when in doubt reboot."

BTW, Windows does this all virtually identically to Linux. Android though has some additional magic to remember the state of an application so it may be restarted right where it was in case it needed to be stopped to reclaim resources to allow another app to run.
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Old November 17th, 2009, 01:47 AM   #81 (permalink)
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Default "Would you like to know more?" -- Starship Troopers

Use Astro or some other file browser and you can peruse /proc and get all the info there is to get on your processes. Long press on a file, select Open As, Text, File Viewer.

/proc/<PID>/cmdline is the human readable Linux command line that started the process. /proc/<PID>/status is a list of key: value pairs that you might find interesting.
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Old November 17th, 2009, 11:21 AM   #82 (permalink)
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This all makes so much sense. I deleted my task killer app yesterday and my phone is running better than ever. I have also had my phone off the charger since 7:30am and it is now almost 11:30am and I have used barely any battery with a pretty heavy amount of usage.
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Old November 17th, 2009, 12:18 PM   #83 (permalink)
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tpriddy, very informative, nice!

I've never had kill -9 create a zombie personally, I use it on a daily basis.
preap is good for killing defunct processes, but that's solaris only
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Old November 17th, 2009, 12:39 PM   #84 (permalink)
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the point here is it's not just battery life but amount of usage it's taking up on the processor and slowing down certain other tasks.
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Old November 17th, 2009, 12:56 PM   #85 (permalink)
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Thank you, tpriddy, for explaining this to all the non believers.
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Old November 17th, 2009, 02:33 PM   #86 (permalink)
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Default In Linux try kill -15 first

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I've never had kill -9 create a zombie personally, I use it on a daily basis.
Try kill -15 or just kill. It defaults to signal 15. Then up-arrow and re-issue that kill after a short moment. If it was well behaved and cleaned-up and exited, or simply exited, your next kill will get "No such process" as confirmation that it went away. If not, then you can grab the larger hammer and whack it with kill -9.

If you want to know what a process is doing you can trace its system calls with strace -p <PID>.

Of course kill and trace only work for the processes owned by your UID... unless you're root.
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Old November 17th, 2009, 04:58 PM   #87 (permalink)
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ATK was the first thing I installed on my droid. I also wasn't getting automatic e-mail notifications either. As soon as I deleted ATK, the e-mails started flowing. Lol.
I think you should ignore your Gmail .
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Old November 17th, 2009, 05:14 PM   #88 (permalink)
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Default Advanced Task Killer? What's the truth?

I am a developer working on Android. So I know a little about how this kind of app works. I am very curious that there are some people said ATK could drain your battery or slow your system. Do you really know how to use it? Shame! Please just give us a proof how it drain your battery. It is only a tool to kill apps running background. Some people say, oh, it's Linux, it don't need to kill apps. I would tell you, if it's an OS, any app consume resources. That's a very very basic term knowledge.
If you killed all apps and ATK itself, how it consume your battery?
Don't you know how to ignore some system related apps?
Don't you know how to close notification?

You even know nothing about ATK, then you just jump up to say 'oh, it doesn't work'. Are you serious. Or just kidding us.
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Old November 17th, 2009, 05:17 PM   #89 (permalink)
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I'm not a developer, so I really don't know how exactly it works, but honestly just having the program running and constantly monitoring background processes is a full time job, so it's clearly going to use resources. I don't see the point, really. Most of the programs I end up closing just reopen themselves anyways as background processes, and my battery life is just peachy, so I'm avoiding task killing apps unless I specifically need to stop something.
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Old November 17th, 2009, 05:20 PM   #90 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by Impact9 View Post
When did volatile memory stopped using electrical power to store information?
You're correct so far...


Quote:
The more apps you have running the more power it's going to use.
...and then you dropped the ball. The hardware doesn't only supply power to part of the volatile memory. All of it is powered at all times, because the hardware only knows '0' and '1'. It has no concept of "this memory address isn't being used, and doesn't need to be powered".
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Old November 17th, 2009, 05:23 PM   #91 (permalink)
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I'm probably speaking out of ignorance but... I just set ATK to kill itself as it is killing everything else. When things get sluggish and I run ATK - the device speeds up. I don't see any difference on battery before I installed it vs. afterwards.
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Old November 17th, 2009, 05:27 PM   #92 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by vincentp View Post
I'm not a developer, so I really don't know how exactly it works, but honestly just having the program running and constantly monitoring background processes is a full time job, so it's clearly going to use resources. I don't see the point, really. Most of the programs I end up closing just reopen themselves anyways as background processes, and my battery life is just peachy, so I'm avoiding task killing apps unless I specifically need to stop something.
I agree with you. Any app consume resources. So ATK consume resources too. We don't need to kill apps all the time. We only need to use it to kill some buggy apps.
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Old November 17th, 2009, 05:31 PM   #93 (permalink)
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I'm probably speaking out of ignorance but... I just set ATK to kill itself as it is killing everything else. When things get sluggish and I run ATK - the device speeds up. I don't see any difference on battery before I installed it vs. afterwards.
Ya, I don't think any app can save our battery either. What it does is to kill apps. Occasionally if it kills some apps consume battery a lot. That may save our battery.
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Old November 17th, 2009, 07:11 PM   #94 (permalink)
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I'm probably speaking out of ignorance but... I just set ATK to kill itself as it is killing everything else. When things get sluggish and I run ATK - the device speeds up. I don't see any difference on battery before I installed it vs. afterwards.
I am currently doing the same thing....I have ATK set to kill itself after it kills the running apps. Battery life increased a ton once I set it to kill itself. Prior to that I left ATK running in the background all the time and it DID drain my battery more than killing it.

I am a fan of closing programs even though I know there is a debate as to whether or not you really need to on the Andriod platform. For me its habitual.
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Old November 17th, 2009, 07:26 PM   #95 (permalink)
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I have merged all these threads about the debate over Task Killer apps. Please post in here and refrain from opening new threads on the same subject.
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Old November 17th, 2009, 07:50 PM   #96 (permalink)
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Today was my first full work day without ATK installed, and my battery life was much better. Phone came off the charger at 7:30AM. I had a day of heavy use (heavy texting, e-mails, one call, 1+ hour of music, Facebook, browsing, camera, installing apps) and about an hour or two after I got home, I checked my battery status to find it was at 50% at 6:30 or so, which is the best I've gotten out of the Droid yet.

So I can definitely vouch for the fact that ATK does not help in the slightest bit. Google knows what they're doing; have faith in their software engineers. Let Android do its thing and quit wasting your time with these apps.
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Old November 17th, 2009, 08:25 PM   #97 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by Jesse View Post
Today was my first full work day without ATK installed, and my battery life was much better. Phone came off the charger at 7:30AM. I had a day of heavy use (heavy texting, e-mails, one call, 1+ hour of music, Facebook, browsing, camera, installing apps) and about an hour or two after I got home, I checked my battery status to find it was at 50% at 6:30 or so, which is the best I've gotten out of the Droid yet.

So I can definitely vouch for the fact that ATK does not help in the slightest bit. Google knows what they're doing; have faith in their software engineers. Let Android do its thing and quit wasting your time with these apps.
Don't know why you think ATK should save your battery? It's a tool to kill apps.
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Old November 17th, 2009, 08:36 PM   #98 (permalink)
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Don't know why you think ATK should save your battery? It's a tool to kill apps.
I'm not saying it saved my battery. I'm just saying I didn't even use it today (to kill apps, and in theory, save battery) and I had the best battery life I've seen yet. People seem to think killing open apps will save their battery, when in fact it doesn't matter. Android manages processes and memory just fine by itself.
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Old November 17th, 2009, 09:03 PM   #99 (permalink)
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I'm not saying it saved my battery. I'm just saying I didn't even use it today (to kill apps, and in theory, save battery) and I had the best battery life I've seen yet. People seem to think killing open apps will save their battery, when in fact it doesn't matter. Android manages processes and memory just fine by itself.
That's a loaded statement that's not necessarily true. For example, there are some apps that when exited (or exited in a certain fashion) still run GPS. Now, sure, you could add an app to turn off GPS, but then you'd have to remember to re-enable it when you open an app that uses. Some people, understandably, don't want to keep a mental tab on their GPS setting.
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Old November 17th, 2009, 11:01 PM   #100 (permalink)
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If you have OCD and you want to constantly close programs because it's just killing you to know there in the background then go right ahead and download one of the task killer apps and enjoy, but it's a waste of time.
You can also tap the desktop then tap create shortcut then settings and create a shortcut to see usage and to force close a program. I forget which ones they are but they are obvious when you click them.
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