Go Back   Android Forums > Android Carriers > AT&T

Get excited for the Samsung Galaxy S5! Find everything you need and discuss it in our Galaxy S5 Forum!

test: Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old March 18th, 2011, 11:16 AM   #1 (permalink)
New Member
Thread Author (OP)
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 8
 
Device(s):
Carrier: Not Provided

Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default AT&T to begin charging iPhone users who tether..

I'm not sure if this was posted anywhere yet. I did a quick scan and didn't see anything.

Crackdown on jailbroken iPhone tethering underway at AT&T - SlashGear

My question is, how do they do it? Is there any chance this could come to other carriers (Verizon) with Android phones?

kevbo is offline  
Reply With Quote
sponsored links
Old March 18th, 2011, 11:21 AM   #2 (permalink)
Senior Member
 
A.Nonymous's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 7,061
 
Device(s): Motorola Razr M, Galaxy Tab 10.1 I/O edition
Carrier: Not Provided

Thanks: 66
Thanked 970 Times in 704 Posts
Default

VZW doesn't charge iPhone users who tether? That's BS. They charge everyone else who tethers.
A.Nonymous is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old March 18th, 2011, 12:02 PM   #3 (permalink)
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Buffalo, NY USA
Posts: 905
 
Device(s): LG Ally, Samsung Fascinate, Viewsonic G-Tablet, B&N Nook Color
Carrier: Not Provided

Thanks: 34
Thanked 99 Times in 84 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by A.Nonymous View Post
VZW doesn't charge iPhone users who tether? That's BS. They charge everyone else who tethers.
Technically, they do. However, I think not many people other than corporate users actually buy the tethering options.
__________________
LG Ally, ClockWorkMod + Velocity 0.4
Samsung Fascinate, EB01 Debloated Deodexed
Viewsonic GTablet, VEGAn 4.1
PSkeptic is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old March 18th, 2011, 12:13 PM   #4 (permalink)
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: NJ
Posts: 4,012
 
Device(s): AT&T White NEXUS S!!!!
Carrier: Not Provided

Thanks: 168
Thanked 222 Times in 178 Posts
Default

The reality is its their business and those who tether without paying is basically stealing.
AndreaCristiano is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old March 18th, 2011, 12:28 PM   #5 (permalink)
Senior Member
 
A.Nonymous's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 7,061
 
Device(s): Motorola Razr M, Galaxy Tab 10.1 I/O edition
Carrier: Not Provided

Thanks: 66
Thanked 970 Times in 704 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by PSkeptic View Post
Technically, they do. However, I think not many people other than corporate users actually buy the tethering options.
That's what I thought. I don't see how this is any change then. Maybe I'm missing something.
A.Nonymous is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old March 18th, 2011, 03:51 PM   #6 (permalink)
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 143
 
Device(s):
Carrier: Not Provided

Thanks: 30
Thanked 19 Times in 12 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by AndreaCristiano View Post
The reality is its their business and those who tether without paying is basically stealing.
It is NONE of their business how I use the bandwidth I'm paying for.
It's my bandwidth. I'm paying for it, not stealing.


It is none of my power company's business how I use the electricity I pay for.
I'm paying for it, not stealing.

It is none of my water company's business how I use the water I pay for.

It is none of my gas company's business how I use the natural gas I pay for.



Maybe packets of data should cost different depending on how I use them, even though the same radio in my phone and same towers and network deliver those packets? And I'm paying for those packets.



As soon as AT&T went to metered bandwidth (eg, $25 for 2 GB) then they lost any legitimate claim to be able to charge extra for tethering. No matter what is in my 2 GB worth of network packets, it does not change the amount of stress on the network nor the resources consumed to route and deliver those packets. It matters not whether those packets go to podunk nowhere or to Google. Nor whether the packets ultimately go to the phone's browser or to my laptop. The same 2 GB or less per month is exchanged between the radio in my phone and the nearby cell towers and carried over the infrastructure.


Tethering seems like the prototype for a great new way for utilities to conduct business!

The electricity company should charge different rates based on how much benefit they perceive that I get from the electricity. When I use electricity to watch TV, it should cost more than the same number of kilowatt hours used to cook food. (Even though delivered over the same wires.)

Similarly, water used for drinking and cooking should cost more than water (delivered by the same pipes!) used to wash dishes.

I think even automobile fuel could work this way! If I buy 87 gas for a four seat car, it should cost more than the same 87 gas (from the same pump!) put into a two seat car. After all, I'm getting more benefit from the gas!

Similarly, if I pay for 2 GB of data, I should have to pay more for it to use it on my laptop than on my phone even though it's delivered by the same towers and infrastructure and at the same cost to AT&T. Why should they get to charge more? Because they can!

(sarcasm)
DannyB is offline  
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to DannyB For This Useful Post:
hjweth (April 19th, 2011)
Old March 18th, 2011, 05:29 PM   #7 (permalink)
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Chicago
Posts: 135
 
Device(s): HTC Inspire, Iphone4, Nokia E63
Carrier: Not Provided

Thanks: 1
Thanked 11 Times in 11 Posts
Default

Yeah. As long as I am within my 2G limit or whatever that I paid for, it should not matter how I use it. It makes no sense. If anything, it should apply to those with unlimited data that tether.
mrcamp is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old March 19th, 2011, 12:45 AM   #8 (permalink)
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: NJ
Posts: 4,012
 
Device(s): AT&T White NEXUS S!!!!
Carrier: Not Provided

Thanks: 168
Thanked 222 Times in 178 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by DannyB View Post
It is NONE of their business how I use the bandwidth I'm paying for.
It's my bandwidth. I'm paying for it, not stealing.


It is none of my power company's business how I use the electricity I pay for.
I'm paying for it, not stealing.

It is none of my water company's business how I use the water I pay for.

It is none of my gas company's business how I use the natural gas I pay for.



Maybe packets of data should cost different depending on how I use them, even though the same radio in my phone and same towers and network deliver those packets? And I'm paying for those packets.



As soon as AT&T went to metered bandwidth (eg, $25 for 2 GB) then they lost any legitimate claim to be able to charge extra for tethering. No matter what is in my 2 GB worth of network packets, it does not change the amount of stress on the network nor the resources consumed to route and deliver those packets. It matters not whether those packets go to podunk nowhere or to Google. Nor whether the packets ultimately go to the phone's browser or to my laptop. The same 2 GB or less per month is exchanged between the radio in my phone and the nearby cell towers and carried over the infrastructure.


Tethering seems like the prototype for a great new way for utilities to conduct business!

The electricity company should charge different rates based on how much benefit they perceive that I get from the electricity. When I use electricity to watch TV, it should cost more than the same number of kilowatt hours used to cook food. (Even though delivered over the same wires.)

Similarly, water used for drinking and cooking should cost more than water (delivered by the same pipes!) used to wash dishes.

I think even automobile fuel could work this way! If I buy 87 gas for a four seat car, it should cost more than the same 87 gas (from the same pump!) put into a two seat car. After all, I'm getting more benefit from the gas!

Similarly, if I pay for 2 GB of data, I should have to pay more for it to use it on my laptop than on my phone even though it's delivered by the same towers and infrastructure and at the same cost to AT&T. Why should they get to charge more? Because they can!

(sarcasm)

So which cellular company let's you tether for free? NONE so at&t is going after people who are and are not paying for the feature and this is somehow wrong? I'm sure you are also one of the first to complain the network has issues and is slow they should do something, but God forbid they charge for the extra data and.stress that tethering puts nonna network and actually A. Make a profit.as a company does and B. Use that money to continue to upgrade their network. You all seem to forget its a privilege to use their network not your RIGHT. stop feeling entitled to.something that you don't deserve
AndreaCristiano is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old March 19th, 2011, 11:33 AM   #9 (permalink)
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 143
 
Device(s):
Carrier: Not Provided

Thanks: 30
Thanked 19 Times in 12 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by AndreaCristiano View Post
So which cellular company let's you tether for free? NONE so at&t is going after people who are and are not paying for the feature and this is somehow wrong?
Yes it is wrong. Just because everyone else does it doesn't make it right.

The feature is "internet access" (aka data plan).

Tethering is not and should not be a "feature".

What if every (no exceptions) gas station charges you an extra 10 cents a gallon for gas if your car has four seats instead of two? What if your electric utility charges you more for the same amount of electricity used for TV vs cooking?

Hey, you signed an agreement. The same kilowatt of electricity to the TV put more "stress" on their network. That same gallon of gasoline put more "stress" on their infrastructure.

You may not think this is a reasonable analogy. But it is. Tethering is something artifical that is completely made up. They're charging me for nothing. For a "feature" with a name. Like that extra 10 cents a gallon. It's just a made up charge for cars with four seats. I am already paying for bandwidth. It's none of their business how my phone uses it. I'm already paying for gasoline, it's none of their business how my car uses it. I'm already paying for electricity, its none of their business how my house uses it.



Quote:
Originally Posted by AndreaCristiano View Post
I'm sure you are also one of the first to complain the network has issues and is slow they should do something, but God forbid they charge for the extra data and.stress that tethering puts nonna network and actually A. Make a profit.as a company does and B. Use that money to continue to upgrade their network.
I am sure you are also one of the first to complain that consumers have issues and want to do something, but God forbid customers should want to save money for something that puts no additional stress on the network and actually A. Save money as a customer does and B. pay a fair amount for the data they use so the company can continue to provide service.



Newsflash for you: it is in my best interest as a customer for AT&T to be profitable so they can continue to provide service.

Just be honest about what I'm paying for and charge me a fair price. None of this deceptive "tethering" nonsense.





Quote:
Originally Posted by AndreaCristiano View Post
You all seem to forget its a privilege to use their network not your RIGHT. stop feeling entitled to.something that you don't deserve
You all seem to forget its a privilege to have me as a customer not your RIGHT. Stop feeling entitled to charge for something artificial you made up that costs you nothing to deliver.

Also: I do deserve tethering. I am paying for data on my phone.



Please answer this question:

Which of the following puts more stress on the network?
1. My phone sending a 1 kilobyte packet to the nearest cell tower.
2. My phone sending a 1 kilobyte packet to the nearest cell tower.

(Note that in the case of number 1 the packet came from my mobile browser, and number 2 the packet came from my laptop browser connected to my phone.)

Which packet was more "stress" on AT&T's network?

Which packet cost AT&T more to route?



There is a reason public utilities are heavily regulated. It is because of nonsense like this tethering. Just because you have no choice but to agree to an unconscionable contract does not make it right. Consumers can and will fight this. And make no mistake it is our right to do so.


As your last sentence said, I'll repeat it right back to you (and AT&T):
Quote:
Originally Posted by AndreaCristiano View Post
stop feeling entitled to.something that you don't deserve
DannyB is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old March 19th, 2011, 01:37 PM   #10 (permalink)
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: NJ
Posts: 4,012
 
Device(s): AT&T White NEXUS S!!!!
Carrier: Not Provided

Thanks: 168
Thanked 222 Times in 178 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by DannyB View Post
Yes it is wrong. Just because everyone else does it doesn't make it right.

The feature is "internet access" (aka data plan).

Tethering is not and should not be a "feature".

What if every (no exceptions) gas station charges you an extra 10 cents a gallon for gas if your car has four seats instead of two? What if your electric utility charges you more for the same amount of electricity used for TV vs cooking?

Hey, you signed an agreement. The same kilowatt of electricity to the TV put more "stress" on their network. That same gallon of gasoline put more "stress" on their infrastructure.

You may not think this is a reasonable analogy. But it is. Tethering is something artifical that is completely made up. They're charging me for nothing. For a "feature" with a name. Like that extra 10 cents a gallon. It's just a made up charge for cars with four seats. I am already paying for bandwidth. It's none of their business how my phone uses it. I'm already paying for gasoline, it's none of their business how my car uses it. I'm already paying for electricity, its none of their business how my house uses it.





I am sure you are also one of the first to complain that consumers have issues and want to do something, but God forbid customers should want to save money for something that puts no additional stress on the network and actually A. Save money as a customer does and B. pay a fair amount for the data they use so the company can continue to provide service.



Newsflash for you: it is in my best interest as a customer for AT&T to be profitable so they can continue to provide service.

Just be honest about what I'm paying for and charge me a fair price. None of this deceptive "tethering" nonsense.







You all seem to forget its a privilege to have me as a customer not your RIGHT. Stop feeling entitled to charge for something artificial you made up that costs you nothing to deliver.

Also: I do deserve tethering. I am paying for data on my phone.



Please answer this question:

Which of the following puts more stress on the network?
1. My phone sending a 1 kilobyte packet to the nearest cell tower.
2. My phone sending a 1 kilobyte packet to the nearest cell tower.

(Note that in the case of number 1 the packet came from my mobile browser, and number 2 the packet came from my laptop browser connected to my phone.)

Which packet was more "stress" on AT&T's network?

Which packet cost AT&T more to route?



There is a reason public utilities are heavily regulated. It is because of nonsense like this tethering. Just because you have no choice but to agree to an unconscionable contract does not make it right. Consumers can and will fight this. And make no mistake it is our right to do so.


As your last sentence said, I'll repeat it right back to you (and AT&T):

Excuse me but you have no idea how business works. A business offers a service for a price and allows you to.use that service as long as you are within the set terms. If you do not like those terms do not use it. You don't need a cell phone or.need to tether. It's a want and as this and other companies are there to offer you a service for profit it is their prerogative what they do and how they charge. If you do not like it I'm sure you can find another company that will care more about you then their bottom line. Oh wait no you won't. Do yourself a favor and go take business 101 and economics 101
AndreaCristiano is offline  
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to AndreaCristiano For This Useful Post:
MosIncredible (March 19th, 2011)
sponsored links
Old March 19th, 2011, 02:06 PM   #11 (permalink)
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: DFW, TX
Posts: 83
 
Device(s): Atrix 3G?
Carrier: Not Provided

Thanks: 13
Thanked 12 Times in 8 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by AndreaCristiano View Post
Excuse me but you have no idea how business works. A business offers a service for a price and allows you to.use that service as long as you are within the set terms. If you do not like those terms do not use it. You don't need a cell phone or.need to tether. It's a want and as this and other companies are there to offer you a service for profit it is their prerogative what they do and how they charge. If you do not like it I'm sure you can find another company that will care more about you then their bottom line. Oh wait no you won't. Do yourself a favor and go take business 101 and economics 101
I've had this same argument in other places about other situations and agree 100%. People feel entitled to stuff that isn't theirs and that they hardly funded at all. Internet is not a product that you can own like a TV, it is a service. You never owned it and never will. You are simply paying for the ability to use their service within their terms.
MosIncredible is offline  
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to MosIncredible For This Useful Post:
AndreaCristiano (March 19th, 2011)
Old March 19th, 2011, 02:15 PM   #12 (permalink)
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: NJ
Posts: 4,012
 
Device(s): AT&T White NEXUS S!!!!
Carrier: Not Provided

Thanks: 168
Thanked 222 Times in 178 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by MosIncredible View Post
I've had this same argument in other places about other situations and agree 100%. People feel entitled to stuff that isn't theirs and that they hardly funded at all. Internet is not a product that you can own like a TV, it is a service. You never owned it and never will. You are simply paying for the ability to use their service within their terms.

Thank you !!!! I see someone understands. People have this you owe me entitled mentality which is unbelievable. Without the concept or understanding that like we have stated its a service being offered for a profit that's what a business does. For instance I own restaurant I will change you what I want I am giving you a service you will pay what I charge
AndreaCristiano is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old March 19th, 2011, 02:59 PM   #13 (permalink)
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 143
 
Device(s):
Carrier: Not Provided

Thanks: 30
Thanked 19 Times in 12 Posts
Default

@AndreaCristiano

Let me see if I can concisely summarize your reply to me:
1. I know nothing about business or economics. (Which is untrue.)
2. Business should be able to do anything it wants and people should just have to bend over and take it.

Your reply also fails:
1. To respond to any of my actual arguments.


It is AT&T which has this "you owe me" mentality, which is unbelievable.

Let me see if I have the business transactions right:
1. They offer hardware. I pay for it.
2. They offer voice service. I pay for it.
3. They offer data service. I pay for it.
With me so far?

It's none of their business how I use my hardware, voice or data service.

What I do with my hardware is none of their business. I can use it as a paperweight.

What I do with my voice service is none of their business. I can have a any conversation I want.

What I do with my 2GB of data service is similarly none of their business.


Please answer the following question.

Which costs AT&T more:
1. A 1 kilobyte packet sent from my phone to the cell phone tower.
2. A 1 kilobyte packet sent from my phone to the cell phone tower.

(Note that packet 1 came from a mobile browser on the phone. Packet 2 came from a browser on my laptop connected to the phone.)

Given your presumably vast knowledge of economics, please explain how tethering is a fair or reasonable revenue model.
DannyB is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old March 19th, 2011, 03:06 PM   #14 (permalink)
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 143
 
Device(s):
Carrier: Not Provided

Thanks: 30
Thanked 19 Times in 12 Posts
Default

@AndreaCristiano

One more question.

Since you seem to believe that anything business does must be okay, then I assume you would be perfectly okay with and have no complaints about the following:

Your electricity company has noticed that you use electricity for watching TV. The electric utility offers a TV viewing plan that you are not signed up for. If you stop watching TV prior to March 27, you will not be signed up for this plan. If you continue to use electricity for watching TV after March 27, the electric utility will add this plan to your bill and begin charging you for it. There is an extra $20 month charge for using your electricity to watch TV.


Please apply all of your arguments to that hypothetical..

Would you just accept it?

Or would YOU be one of those people who feel ENTITLED to use electricity for TV without paying for the electric company's TV viewing plan?
DannyB is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old March 19th, 2011, 03:06 PM   #15 (permalink)
Senior Member
 
RoboMonkey's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 1,194
 
Device(s): Htc Vivid, LG Nitro HD, Epic 4g, HTC Evo 4G, LG Optimus V
Carrier: Not Provided

Thanks: 138
Thanked 115 Times in 89 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by AndreaCristiano View Post
So which cellular company let's you tether for free? NONE so at&t is going after people who are and are not paying for the feature and this is somehow wrong? I'm sure you are also one of the first to complain the network has issues and is slow they should do something, but God forbid they charge for the extra data and.stress that tethering puts nonna network and actually A. Make a profit.as a company does and B. Use that money to continue to upgrade their network. You all seem to forget its a privilege to use their network not your RIGHT. stop feeling entitled to.something that you don't deserve
Virgin mobile LG optimus V
__________________
I'm sooo over rooting.
RoboMonkey is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old March 19th, 2011, 03:37 PM   #16 (permalink)
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: NJ
Posts: 4,012
 
Device(s): AT&T White NEXUS S!!!!
Carrier: Not Provided

Thanks: 168
Thanked 222 Times in 178 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by DannyB View Post
@AndreaCristiano

One more question.

Since you seem to believe that anything business does must be okay, then I assume you would be perfectly okay with and have no complaints about the following:

Your electricity company has noticed that you use electricity for watching TV. The electric utility offers a TV viewing plan that you are not signed up for. If you stop watching TV prior to March 27, you will not be signed up for this plan. If you continue to use electricity for watching TV after March 27, the electric utility will add this plan to your bill and begin charging you for it. There is an extra $20 month charge for using your electricity to watch TV.


Please apply all of your arguments to that hypothetical..

Would you just accept it?

Or would YOU be one of those people who feel ENTITLED to use electricity for TV without paying for the electric company's TV viewing plan?

What you do not seem to understand is this had nothing to do with being ok with it or not. The bottom line is any type of service industry places premium pricing on premium or what they believe to be premium services. Once again to explain your analogy about the energy company doesn't work. Energy is a necessity. Tv, mobile phone service etc.etc.is NOT a necessity it is a service provided to you by a service provider and they can charge ad they feel for their services they offer because without them you can not use that service.
AndreaCristiano is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old March 19th, 2011, 04:08 PM   #17 (permalink)
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 143
 
Device(s):
Carrier: Not Provided

Thanks: 30
Thanked 19 Times in 12 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by AndreaCristiano View Post
What you do not seem to understand is this had nothing to do with being ok with it or not. The bottom line is any type of service industry places premium pricing on premium or what they believe to be premium services. Once again to explain your analogy about the energy company doesn't work. Energy is a necessity. Tv, mobile phone service etc.etc.is NOT a necessity it is a service provided to you by a service provider and they can charge and they feel for their services they offer because without them you can not use that service.
I think I understand the issue just fine. AT&T feels entitled to what it does not deserve: more of my money for providing me nothing. They're not giving me more hardware. They're not providing me more network capability. They just feel entitled to charge for the way that I use what I've already paid for.

It's you that doesn't seem to understand this.

People lived for thousands of years without electricity. It was not considered necessary any more than mobile data service is. Suppose the hypothetical were that when electricity was new the power company decided (unfairly) to charge different rates for how you used the electricity. You still don't answer my question. Would YOU be one of the ENTITLED people who think that you should be able able to use the electricity you paid for any way that you like?

You also never answer which of those 1 killobyte packets cost AT&T more or put more stress on their network.

I understand the economics just fine and you can stop being insulting now. You completely ignore that I earlier said it is in my best interest for AT&T to be profitable. I just want them to be honest about it. Stop with this "tethering" nonsense where they are charging me something for nothing.

I pay for 2 GB of data. Even with my laptop occasionally connected, I'm never going to exceed the 2 GB I paid for. So tethering offers me absolutely nothing, and the way I use my phone and laptop does not place additional stress on their network.

To avoid confusion: at no point was I ever talking about TV mobile service. Maybe you are simply not reading my messages?

Finally, they CANNOT charge whatever they want. There is a reason they are heavily regulated. It is because the government is granting them a M O N O P O L Y on some portion of the limited spectrum.

I'm all for business. I'm all for business making a profit. You know selling something for a fair price. I am happy for AT&T to charge me whatever it costs so they can deliver good data service and make a profit. How I use the bandwidth I pay for is none of their business.
DannyB is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old March 19th, 2011, 04:17 PM   #18 (permalink)
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: NJ
Posts: 4,012
 
Device(s): AT&T White NEXUS S!!!!
Carrier: Not Provided

Thanks: 168
Thanked 222 Times in 178 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by DannyB View Post
I think I understand the issue just fine. AT&T feels entitled to what it does not deserve: more of my money for providing me nothing. They're not giving me more hardware. They're not providing me more network capability. They just feel entitled to charge for the way that I use what I've already paid for.

It's you that doesn't seem to understand this.

People lived for thousands of years without electricity. It was not considered necessary any more than mobile data service is. Suppose the hypothetical were that when electricity was new the power company decided (unfairly) to charge different rates for how you used the electricity. You still don't answer my question. Would YOU be one of the ENTITLED people who think that you should be able able to use the electricity you paid for any way that you like?

You also never answer which of those 1 killobyte packets cost AT&T more or put more stress on their network.

I understand the economics just fine and you can stop being insulting now. You completely ignore that I earlier said it is in my best interest for AT&T to be profitable. I just want them to be honest about it. Stop with this "tethering" nonsense where they are charging me something for nothing.

I pay for 2 GB of data. Even with my laptop occasionally connected, I'm never going to exceed the 2 GB I paid for. So tethering offers me absolutely nothing, and the way I use my phone and laptop does not place additional stress on their network.

To avoid confusion: at no point was I ever talking about TV mobile service. Maybe you are simply not reading my messages?

Finally, they CANNOT charge whatever they want. There is a reason they are heavily regulated. It is because the government is granting them a M O N O P O L Y on some portion of the limited spectrum.

I'm all for business. I'm all for business making a profit. You know selling something for a fair price. I am happy for AT&T to charge me whatever it costs so they can deliver good data service and make a profit. How I use the bandwidth I pay for is none of their business.

All I can say to you is if there is a provider who doesn't charge go there
AndreaCristiano is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old March 19th, 2011, 04:26 PM   #19 (permalink)
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 143
 
Device(s):
Carrier: Not Provided

Thanks: 30
Thanked 19 Times in 12 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by AndreaCristiano View Post
All I can say to you is if there is a provider who doesn't charge go there
You're saying I should just bend over and take it or else leave.


No thanks. Instead I'll exercise my rights and write the FCC, the FTC, and maybe some legislators.
DannyB is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old March 19th, 2011, 04:38 PM   #20 (permalink)
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: NJ
Posts: 4,012
 
Device(s): AT&T White NEXUS S!!!!
Carrier: Not Provided

Thanks: 168
Thanked 222 Times in 178 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by DannyB View Post
You're saying I should just bend over and take it or else leave.


No thanks. Instead I'll exercise my rights and write the FCC, the FTC, and maybe some legislators.

Lol lol lol good luck with that. They aren't doing anything illegal or unethical.
AndreaCristiano is offline  
Reply With Quote
sponsored links
Old March 19th, 2011, 04:52 PM   #21 (permalink)
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 143
 
Device(s):
Carrier: Not Provided

Thanks: 30
Thanked 19 Times in 12 Posts
Default

Thank you. You're right about legal. Wrong about ethical. No mattet what the market won't accept tethering in the LONG term.
DannyB is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old March 19th, 2011, 05:21 PM   #22 (permalink)
Member
 
poriggity's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Blue Jay, Ca
Posts: 198
 
Device(s): Samsung Galaxy SIII
Carrier: AT&T

Thanks: 14
Thanked 31 Times in 25 Posts
Default

I'm with Danny B on this one.. I pay for the Data, and whether I use it to surf on my laptop, or on my phone should make no difference.
Scott
poriggity is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old March 19th, 2011, 05:34 PM   #23 (permalink)
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: NJ
Posts: 4,012
 
Device(s): AT&T White NEXUS S!!!!
Carrier: Not Provided

Thanks: 168
Thanked 222 Times in 178 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by DannyB View Post
Thank you. You're right about legal. Wrong about ethical. No mattet what the market won't accept tethering in the LONG term.

That's for the courts to decide but remember they sided with the cable companies and their fees. I don't see them siding with is here
AndreaCristiano is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old March 19th, 2011, 05:50 PM   #24 (permalink)
Senior Member
 
RoboMonkey's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 1,194
 
Device(s): Htc Vivid, LG Nitro HD, Epic 4g, HTC Evo 4G, LG Optimus V
Carrier: Not Provided

Thanks: 138
Thanked 115 Times in 89 Posts
Default

They can only tell if you're tethering if you're using tons of data or if you're data habits have dramatically changed. So play nice and it's a non issue.

Att can charge what they want and people have a legal right to use the data they are paying for, so good luck to Att if the ever take someone to court for using what they paid for.
RoboMonkey is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old March 19th, 2011, 05:57 PM   #25 (permalink)
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 143
 
Device(s):
Carrier: Not Provided

Thanks: 30
Thanked 19 Times in 12 Posts
Default

Att requires arbitration in order to avoid court. Read your agreement. I did.
DannyB is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old March 19th, 2011, 05:59 PM   #26 (permalink)
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 143
 
Device(s):
Carrier: Not Provided

Thanks: 30
Thanked 19 Times in 12 Posts
Default

We can speculate about the future all day.

IMO Att will come around. The market won't accept tethering.
DannyB is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old March 19th, 2011, 07:11 PM   #27 (permalink)
Senior Member
 
RoboMonkey's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 1,194
 
Device(s): Htc Vivid, LG Nitro HD, Epic 4g, HTC Evo 4G, LG Optimus V
Carrier: Not Provided

Thanks: 138
Thanked 115 Times in 89 Posts
Default

As a Fee?
RoboMonkey is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old March 19th, 2011, 07:23 PM   #28 (permalink)
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: NJ
Posts: 4,012
 
Device(s): AT&T White NEXUS S!!!!
Carrier: Not Provided

Thanks: 168
Thanked 222 Times in 178 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by RoboMonkey View Post
As a Fee?

Yea he assumes that the market don't accept the fee for tethering yet they have for a while now
AndreaCristiano is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old March 20th, 2011, 11:24 AM   #29 (permalink)
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 143
 
Device(s):
Carrier: Not Provided

Thanks: 30
Thanked 19 Times in 12 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by AndreaCristiano View Post
Yea he assumes that the market don't accept the fee for tethering yet they have for a while now
Feel free to disagree while offering no evidence to support your position.

As evidence of my position that the market won't accept tethering I would point out the following.

AT&T used to charge $60 (or once even more) for tethering.

Now they charge $20 for it.

The change in price is evidence that they partially understand that the market won't accept them charging a fee for nothing. Yes, a fee for NOTHING. They're not giving me more capacity on their network, and they're not giving me additional hardware. They're just saying I have their blessing to use the phone I already paid for and the bandwidth I already paid for in a way that I like. I say I don't need their blessing to use what I already paid for.

In an attempt to give legitimacy to the $20 tethering, they bundle it with an additional 2 GB of data.

But I don't need the additional 2 GB. They're forcing me to buy additional data I don't need in order to use the data I already paid for in a particular way that happens to be useful.


Since you support this tethering, you should not have any problem with your electricity utility wanting to sign you up for a $20 / month "TV viewing" plan that allows you to use the electricity you paid for to watch TV. If you disagree with it then you are just one of those freeloaders who feels entitled to something for nothing. After all, the electric utility had to invest significantly in building their network. I could insultingly repeat back to you that you don't understand basic economics and should take economics 101.

You also argued that electricity is a necessity but tethering is not a necessity. I would argue that maybe electricity is a necessity, but TV watching is not a necessity. So again using your very own arguments, why should you be willing to pay for a "TV viewing" plan for the low low price of only $20 / month.

The reason is what I'm saying. Because in this hypothetical, the electric utility is wanting you to pay something for nothing. So to add legitimacy to it they could say, that the TV viewing plan also comes with an extra XX number of kilowatt hours per month. So how can you argue with that? In fact, I would be happy to accept your $20 / month payment for the "TV viewing" plan that enables you to use some of your electricity to watch TV.

Do you think the market would accept the electric utility offering a "TV viewing" plan that give you permission to use the electricity you already paid for to watch TV?

I don't think it would. And I don't think it will accept tethering either. And as evidence I note how AT&T has recently changed the pricing of tethering and attempted to make it seem more legitimate.

Again, feel free to disagree without ever once offering evidence or refuting any of my arguments at all. Feel free to offer insults and accuse me of anything because I believe tethering is nothing but a scam. Say I'm feeling "entitled". Whatever.
DannyB is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old March 20th, 2011, 11:58 AM   #30 (permalink)
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: NJ
Posts: 4,012
 
Device(s): AT&T White NEXUS S!!!!
Carrier: Not Provided

Thanks: 168
Thanked 222 Times in 178 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by DannyB View Post
Feel free to disagree while offering no evidence to support your position.

As evidence of my position that the market won't accept tethering I would point out the following.

AT&T used to charge $60 (or once even more) for tethering.

Now they charge $20 for it.

The change in price is evidence that they partially understand that the market won't accept them charging a fee for nothing. Yes, a fee for NOTHING. They're not giving me more capacity on their network, and they're not giving me additional hardware. They're just saying I have their blessing to use the phone I already paid for and the bandwidth I already paid for in a way that I like. I say I don't need their blessing to use what I already paid for.

In an attempt to give legitimacy to the $20 tethering, they bundle it with an additional 2 GB of data.

But I don't need the additional 2 GB. They're forcing me to buy additional data I don't need in order to use the data I already paid for in a particular way that happens to be useful.


Since you support this tethering, you should not have any problem with your electricity utility wanting to sign you up for a $20 / month "TV viewing" plan that allows you to use the electricity you paid for to watch TV. If you disagree with it then you are just one of those freeloaders who feels entitled to something for nothing. After all, the electric utility had to invest significantly in building their network. I could insultingly repeat back to you that you don't understand basic economics and should take economics 101.

You also argued that electricity is a necessity but tethering is not a necessity. I would argue that maybe electricity is a necessity, but TV watching is not a necessity. So again using your very own arguments, why should you be willing to pay for a "TV viewing" plan for the low low price of only $20 / month.

The reason is what I'm saying. Because in this hypothetical, the electric utility is wanting you to pay something for nothing. So to add legitimacy to it they could say, that the TV viewing plan also comes with an extra XX number of kilowatt hours per month. So how can you argue with that? In fact, I would be happy to accept your $20 / month payment for the "TV viewing" plan that enables you to use some of your electricity to watch TV.

Do you think the market would accept the electric utility offering a "TV viewing" plan that give you permission to use the electricity you already paid for to watch TV?

I don't think it would. And I don't think it will accept tethering either. And as evidence I note how AT&T has recently changed the pricing of tethering and attempted to make it seem more legitimate.

Again, feel free to disagree without ever once offering evidence or refuting any of my arguments at all. Feel free to offer insults and accuse me of anything because I believe tethering is nothing but a scam. Say I'm feeling "entitled". Whatever.

I can't even talk to you. You make assumptions and are illogical. Have a nice life.
AndreaCristiano is offline  
Reply With Quote
sponsored links
Old March 20th, 2011, 01:54 PM   #31 (permalink)
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 143
 
Device(s):
Carrier: Not Provided

Thanks: 30
Thanked 19 Times in 12 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by AndreaCristiano View Post
I can't even talk to you. You make assumptions and are illogical. Have a nice life.
I'm sorry you feel that way.

It seems you should be able to easily expose my illogic and point out any incorrect assumptions.

Unfortunately, you never seem to reply to any of the actual substance of the argument. Instead you always resort to saying things about me personally rather than about tethering.
DannyB is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old March 20th, 2011, 03:15 PM   #32 (permalink)
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: NJ
Posts: 4,012
 
Device(s): AT&T White NEXUS S!!!!
Carrier: Not Provided

Thanks: 168
Thanked 222 Times in 178 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by DannyB View Post
I'm sorry you feel that way.

It seems you should be able to easily expose my illogic and point out any incorrect assumptions.

Unfortunately, you never seem to reply to any of the actual substance of the argument. Instead you always resort to saying things about me personally rather than about tethering.

Your assumptions are based on right and wrong. The problem with this is that is not how the free market works. Until there is people who will pay for a service they will charge. Same thing as when people complained about the extra fees for sms. There was even a lawsuit guess.what happened. Fees changed and they got around it with the bundle pricing. I have true to tell you just because you feel its wrong doesn't make it bad or illegal business and until it is it won't go away
AndreaCristiano is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old March 20th, 2011, 10:23 PM   #33 (permalink)
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 37
 
Device(s):
Carrier: Not Provided

Thanks: 1
Thanked 4 Times in 3 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by DannyB View Post
It is NONE of their business how I use the bandwidth I'm paying for.
It's my bandwidth. I'm paying for it, not stealing.


It is none of my power company's business how I use the electricity I pay for.
I'm paying for it, not stealing.

It is none of my water company's business how I use the water I pay for.

It is none of my gas company's business how I use the natural gas I pay for.



Maybe packets of data should cost different depending on how I use them, even though the same radio in my phone and same towers and network deliver those packets? And I'm paying for those packets.



As soon as AT&T went to metered bandwidth (eg, $25 for 2 GB) then they lost any legitimate claim to be able to charge extra for tethering. No matter what is in my 2 GB worth of network packets, it does not change the amount of stress on the network nor the resources consumed to route and deliver those packets. It matters not whether those packets go to podunk nowhere or to Google. Nor whether the packets ultimately go to the phone's browser or to my laptop. The same 2 GB or less per month is exchanged between the radio in my phone and the nearby cell towers and carried over the infrastructure.


Tethering seems like the prototype for a great new way for utilities to conduct business!

The electricity company should charge different rates based on how much benefit they perceive that I get from the electricity. When I use electricity to watch TV, it should cost more than the same number of kilowatt hours used to cook food. (Even though delivered over the same wires.)

Similarly, water used for drinking and cooking should cost more than water (delivered by the same pipes!) used to wash dishes.

I think even automobile fuel could work this way! If I buy 87 gas for a four seat car, it should cost more than the same 87 gas (from the same pump!) put into a two seat car. After all, I'm getting more benefit from the gas!

Similarly, if I pay for 2 GB of data, I should have to pay more for it to use it on my laptop than on my phone even though it's delivered by the same towers and infrastructure and at the same cost to AT&T. Why should they get to charge more? Because they can!

(sarcasm)

Your analogy only works some of the time...what about all you can eat buffets (or similar instances) do they let you bring your whole family and just pay once? No they charge a share plate fee...how is this different?
gatorguy is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old March 20th, 2011, 10:40 PM   #34 (permalink)
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: NJ
Posts: 4,012
 
Device(s): AT&T White NEXUS S!!!!
Carrier: Not Provided

Thanks: 168
Thanked 222 Times in 178 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by gatorguy View Post
Your analogy only works some of the time...what about all you can eat buffets (or similar instances) do they let you bring your whole family and just pay once? No they charge a share plate fee...how is this different?
its not he just feels that he deserves to do whatever he wants with AT&T's bandwidth. He doesnt seem to get that its not HIS! the phone he owns is but the network, data, voice, mms , sms etc is owned by AT&T and they charge what the market allows
AndreaCristiano is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old March 21st, 2011, 09:37 AM   #35 (permalink)
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 143
 
Device(s):
Carrier: Not Provided

Thanks: 30
Thanked 19 Times in 12 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by gatorguy View Post
Your analogy only works some of the time...what about all you can eat buffets (or similar instances) do they let you bring your whole family and just pay once? No they charge a share plate fee...how is this different?
I'm not sure I understand your question.

I'm not saying I want to share my bandwidth with anyone else. It's just me using bandwidth I paid for on a phone I paid for. (The fact that I use a laptop is irrelevant.)
DannyB is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old March 21st, 2011, 09:38 AM   #36 (permalink)
Senior Member
 
Oridus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 502
 
Device(s): at&t: HTC One, iPhone 5
Carrier: Not Provided

Thanks: 25
Thanked 143 Times in 47 Posts
Default

I have a question. Doesn't tethering in essence chew through more bandwidth in a smaller period of time due to the nature of which it's delivered? I mean... if I were to be in a 3g zone, and had my laptop tethered to my phone, and wanted to stream 5 youtube videos, I technically could, right? In essence, if I were to use the same phone, UN tethered, would I be able to stream 5 youtube videos at once? (All playing simultaneously).

It's just a general question.... I thought this was the fact of which why companies charge for tethering.. people are more apt to go over in bandwidth allotment on a tethered device (most commonly a laptop or tablet) aren't they? I'm not looking to get flamed here.. it's just a question.

As far as the TV analogy... I guess if I were to use a 15'' TV to watch my shows for 3 hours, and then I were to watch the same amount of shows for 3 hours on a 60'' TV... I would use MORE electricity, wouldn't i? Just throwing it out there.
__________________
Current: HTC One, iPhone 5

My statements and opinions do not reflect those of my employer, AT&T Mobility.
Oridus is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old March 21st, 2011, 09:39 AM   #37 (permalink)
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 143
 
Device(s):
Carrier: Not Provided

Thanks: 30
Thanked 19 Times in 12 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by AndreaCristiano View Post
its not he just feels that he deserves to do whatever he wants with AT&T's bandwidth. He doesnt seem to get that its not HIS! the phone he owns is but the network, data, voice, mms , sms etc is owned by AT&T and they charge what the market allows
Please don't misquote me.

I feel that I deserve to do whatever I want with MY bandwidth. Not AT&T's bandwidth. I pay hard earned money for that bandwidth. It's mine. I paid for it.

AT&T charges a fee for bandwidth and I pay that fee.

It is my bandwidth just like it is my phone hardware.

You seem to think that once I buy something from AT&T that it is still theirs.

Edit: add . . .

I pay for a certain amount of bandwidth and then use that bandwidth. It's none of AT&T's business how I use that bandwidth.

Again, you never actually address the substance of my arguments why it's okay for me to use what I paid for.
DannyB is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old March 21st, 2011, 09:45 AM   #38 (permalink)
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 143
 
Device(s):
Carrier: Not Provided

Thanks: 30
Thanked 19 Times in 12 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Oridus View Post
I have a question. Doesn't tethering in essence chew through more bandwidth in a smaller period of time due to the nature of which it's delivered? I mean... if I were to be in a 3g zone, and had my laptop tethered to my phone, and wanted to stream 5 youtube videos, I technically could, right? In essence, if I were to use the same phone, UN tethered, would I be able to stream 5 youtube videos at once? (All playing simultaneously).

It's just a general question.... I thought this was the fact of which why companies charge for tethering.. people are more apt to go over in bandwidth allotment on a tethered device (most commonly a laptop or tablet) aren't they? I'm not looking to get flamed here.. it's just a question.

As far as the TV analogy... I guess if I were to use a 15'' TV to watch my shows for 3 hours, and then I were to watch the same amount of shows for 3 hours on a 60'' TV... I would use MORE electricity, wouldn't i? Just throwing it out there.

Thank you for having an actual point to make.

You make a very good point.

My answer is that AT&T controls (and rightfully should be able to control) the upload / download rates. So if I watch five YouTube videos and it reaches the limit on download rate, some (or all) of those videos aren't going to play properly.

AT&T should limit download rate, IF (and only if) it is affecting network congestion. After all it is important that they keep the network operational for all of their customers.

That said, it is also important that they build out their infrastructure to support what is needed by customers. And they rightfully should charge enough for bandwidth to pay for building that network. And I'm happy to pay for it. But it is none of their business what is in my packets, or what the source or destination of those packets are.
DannyB is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old March 21st, 2011, 09:47 AM   #39 (permalink)
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Buffalo, NY USA
Posts: 905
 
Device(s): LG Ally, Samsung Fascinate, Viewsonic G-Tablet, B&N Nook Color
Carrier: Not Provided

Thanks: 34
Thanked 99 Times in 84 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by AndreaCristiano View Post
The reality is its their business and those who tether without paying is basically stealing.
That's what the broadband providers said when they wanted to charge you more if you had a router on the end of the cable/DSL modem.

However, that quickly died as soon as the ISP's realized they have no way to really control it.

I paid for an unlimited data plan. It's my business what I use my unlimited data for. If I use it for TOR, that's my business. If I use it for copyright infringement, that's my business. If I use it to give my tablet internet access while mobile, that's my business.

I paid for an unlimited data plan.

If I paid for a 2GB/month plan, then it's my business what I use my 2GB for, and how I use it.

Just like my broadband at home. I pay for 1Mb/768Kb pipes. It's my business what I use my pipe for.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DannyB View Post
We can speculate about the future all day.

IMO Att will come around. The market won't accept tethering.
All of the providers will come around. They tried this before with home broadband, wanting to charge you double rates if you shared the connection with 2 PC's at home.

It's just a matter of time before the mobile data carriers figure out people will pay extra for tiered speeds, but not more just based on how they use their bandwidth.
PSkeptic is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old March 21st, 2011, 09:54 AM   #40 (permalink)
Senior Member
 
Oridus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 502
 
Device(s): at&t: HTC One, iPhone 5
Carrier: Not Provided

Thanks: 25
Thanked 143 Times in 47 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by DannyB View Post
Thank you for having an actual point to make.

You make a very good point.

My answer is that AT&T controls (and rightfully should be able to control) the upload / download rates. So if I watch five YouTube videos and it reaches the limit on download rate, some (or all) of those videos aren't going to play properly.

AT&T should limit download rate, IF (and only if) it is affecting network congestion. After all it is important that they keep the network operational for all of their customers.

That said, it is also important that they build out their infrastructure to support what is needed by customers. And they rightfully should charge enough for bandwidth to pay for building that network. And I'm happy to pay for it. But it is none of their business what is in my packets, or what the source or destination of those packets are.

The only last statement I would have to make then... is that maybe at&t is basing the charges off the majority who wouldn't possibly monitor how much data they're using. Judging from what I have observed, most of the general public using smartphones these days are still learning about the internet, and how much bandwidth is how much bandwidth. Most of the people I speak with or sell smartphones to don't know the difference between a kb or Mb.... they just know they want the internet. And rightfully so. Just like a person who buys a car most likely won't know the specifics in how it goes, just that it goes. The car enthusiasts or mechanics would know how it runs. Internet savvy / Tech savvy would know how much a kb or Mb is... but the general population wouldn't need to know... they just know how to use it. Is it possible that the majority of people who tether most commonly go over the amount of bandwidth allowed per month without knowing?

I know you would know when to stop or how to limit yourself, but a lot of people are still learning. A lot of people I speak with think that the ability to tether allows them to use their cell phone's internet as a main internet source... (especially in places where landline internet services aren't always available). That being said, could you imagine the amount of bandwidth that would be chewed through in a month by a couple using a single cellular device every day for their main internet connection? That could become quite the problem as more and more people learn how to tether and want the mobility of it... especially when speed is becoming more and more of non-issue with the widening scope of 3g and soon 4g/lte. Not saying it for certain, but I think a HUGE number of people will try ditching land line carriers for wireless ones, for sake of 1 bill, and mobility.... not realizing the caps imposed on them.
Oridus is offline  
Last edited by Oridus; March 21st, 2011 at 09:58 AM.
Reply With Quote
sponsored links
Old March 21st, 2011, 09:58 AM   #41 (permalink)
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 143
 
Device(s):
Carrier: Not Provided

Thanks: 30
Thanked 19 Times in 12 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by PSkeptic View Post
All of the providers will come around. . . . . It's just a matter of time before the mobile data carriers figure out people will pay extra for tiered speeds, but not more just based on how they use their bandwidth.
I agree. Further, I provided some evidence that it is already happening.
DannyB is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old March 21st, 2011, 10:09 AM   #42 (permalink)
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 143
 
Device(s):
Carrier: Not Provided

Thanks: 30
Thanked 19 Times in 12 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Oridus View Post
The only last statement I would have to make then... is that maybe at&t is basing the charges off the majority who wouldn't possibly monitor how much data they're using. Judging from what I have observed, most of the general public using smartphones these days . . . . don't know the difference between a kb or Mb.... they just know they want the internet. . . . . Is it possible that the majority of people who tether most commonly go over the amount of bandwidth allowed per month without knowing?
Another excellent point. There is consumer confusion about "how much data should I buy?". That is a difficult marketing problem for any ISP. Similarly people buying a USB Thumb drive or SD card wonder "should I buy the 1 GB or the 4 GB?". One way that is been addressed is the packaging for the USB thumb drive or SD card has labeling suggesting how many photos, songs and pictures a given capacity can hold. One way AT&T could sell their current plans is that 250 MB is for light internet usage and no streaming of music or video. 2 GB is for if 250 MB is not enough. And if you go over, you only pay $10 per extra GB used -- which is not a lot. And finally, provide tools so a user can monitor their usage, and send the user a text when they approach their limit.

Using your car analogy, people don't know how a car works, they would wonder how much horsepower do I need? How much gasoline should I buy? But since we all deal with this everyday, it becomes common knowledge. Similarly, in ten years everyone will know how many GB worth of data they should buy.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Oridus View Post
I know you would know when to stop or how to limit yourself, but a lot of people are still learning. A lot of people I speak with think that the ability to tether allows them to use their cell phone's internet as a main internet source... (especially in places where landline internet services aren't always available).
I very carefully monitor how much bandwidth I use. I've never gone over. (In fact, I've never even come close.) And if I needed to go over, I would be more than happy to pay the $10 per GB charge for going over.

I have also met people who think of wireless as simply an alternative way to get Internet service somewhere that broadband is not available. Maybe they should consider there is a reason why broadband is not available in their area.
DannyB is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old March 21st, 2011, 10:51 AM   #43 (permalink)
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: NJ
Posts: 4,012
 
Device(s): AT&T White NEXUS S!!!!
Carrier: Not Provided

Thanks: 168
Thanked 222 Times in 178 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by DannyB View Post
Please don't misquote me.

I feel that I deserve to do whatever I want with MY bandwidth. Not AT&T's bandwidth. I pay hard earned money for that bandwidth. It's mine. I paid for it.

AT&T charges a fee for bandwidth and I pay that fee.

It is my bandwidth just like it is my phone hardware.

You seem to think that once I buy something from AT&T that it is still theirs.

Edit: add . . .

I pay for a certain amount of bandwidth and then use that bandwidth. It's none of AT&T's business how I use that bandwidth.

Again, you never actually address the substance of my arguments why it's okay for me to use what I paid for.

I have addressed it 1 million times its not YOUR bandwidth its ATT YOU ARE JUST PAYING FOR THE RIGHT TO USE IT AS THEY ALLOW!!!! you keep saying my bandwidth its not yours!!!
AndreaCristiano is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old March 21st, 2011, 10:54 AM   #44 (permalink)
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Buffalo, NY USA
Posts: 905
 
Device(s): LG Ally, Samsung Fascinate, Viewsonic G-Tablet, B&N Nook Color
Carrier: Not Provided

Thanks: 34
Thanked 99 Times in 84 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by AndreaCristiano View Post
I have addressed it 1 million times its not YOUR bandwidth its ATT YOU ARE JUST PAYING FOR THE RIGHT TO USE IT AS THEY ALLOW!!!! you keep saying my bandwidth its not yours!!!
It's actually my bandwidth, once I paid for it... Kinda like a rented apartment: It's mine as long as I keep current with my rent. My landlord can't come into my apartment and dictate what I can and can't do if I have not invited him/her in.
PSkeptic is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old March 21st, 2011, 10:58 AM   #45 (permalink)
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: NJ
Posts: 4,012
 
Device(s): AT&T White NEXUS S!!!!
Carrier: Not Provided

Thanks: 168
Thanked 222 Times in 178 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by PSkeptic View Post
It's actually my bandwidth, once I paid for it... Kinda like a rented apartment: It's mine as long as I keep current with my rent. My landlord can't come into my apartment and dictate what I can and can't do if I have not invited him/her in.

That's an incorrect analogy. When you rent an apartment in your lease it tells you what you can and can't do with your apartment. Same as your bandwidth with your telecom company. The apartment is actually never yours you are paying for the right to stay there and utilize it. Same as your bandwidth your paying for the ability to use it within your contractual terms. So yea you don't own either
AndreaCristiano is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old March 21st, 2011, 11:16 AM   #46 (permalink)
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 143
 
Device(s):
Carrier: Not Provided

Thanks: 30
Thanked 19 Times in 12 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by AndreaCristiano View Post
That's an incorrect analogy. When you rent an apartment in your lease it tells you what you can and can't do with your apartment. Same as your bandwidth with your telecom company.

The analogy seemed pretty reasonable to me.

Your lease does tell you what you can and cannot do. But there are reasonable limits on what the landlord can impose as conditions.

Tethering is like the landlord telling you that there is an extra $20 / month fee if you want to read expensive books. After all, the landlord thinks you have enough money that you'll just fork it over for no reason. What kind of books a renter reads is none of the landlords business. The landlord has a right to protect his rented property, but reading books does not stress the property in any way and has zero cost to the landlord.

Tethering is just using the bandwidth you've already paid for. There is no reason there should be any additional fee for using what you've already paid for. You fail to give any reason why there should be a cost for doing something that has zero cost to AT&T.
DannyB is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old March 21st, 2011, 11:18 AM   #47 (permalink)
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: NJ
Posts: 4,012
 
Device(s): AT&T White NEXUS S!!!!
Carrier: Not Provided

Thanks: 168
Thanked 222 Times in 178 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by DannyB View Post
The analogy seemed pretty reasonable to me.

Your lease does tell you what you can and cannot do. But there are reasonable limits on what the landlord can impose as conditions.

Tethering is like the landlord telling you that there is an extra $20 / month fee if you want to read expensive books. After all, the landlord thinks you have enough money that you'll just fork it over for no reason. What kind of books a renter reads is none of the landlords business. The landlord has a right to protect his rented property, but reading books does not stress the property in any way and has zero cost to the landlord.

Tethering is just using the bandwidth you've already paid for. There is no reason there should be any additional fee for using what you've already paid for. You fail to give any reason why there should be a cost for doing something that has zero cost to AT&T.

No that's incorrect tethering is like your landlord saying you can paint your walls but any other modifications we will have to charge you. Your wall and the paint is included in the agreement but if you do anything beyond that there will be a fee
AndreaCristiano is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old March 21st, 2011, 11:20 AM   #48 (permalink)
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 143
 
Device(s):
Carrier: Not Provided

Thanks: 30
Thanked 19 Times in 12 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by AndreaCristiano View Post
No that's incorrect tethering is like your landlord saying you can paint your walls but any other modifications we will have to charge you. Your wall and the paint is included in the agreement but if you do anything beyond that there will be a fee
I'm not making any modifications to any AT&T property. So how exactly is it like that?
DannyB is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old March 21st, 2011, 11:25 AM   #49 (permalink)
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: NJ
Posts: 4,012
 
Device(s): AT&T White NEXUS S!!!!
Carrier: Not Provided

Thanks: 168
Thanked 222 Times in 178 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by DannyB View Post
I'm not making any modifications to any AT&T property. So how exactly is it like that?

Yes you are. The bandwidth is their property they own it. If they tell you this allotment can not be used for tethering unless you purchase this and you do it anyway that is making a modification to your usage arrangement with the company. Basically a breach of contract
AndreaCristiano is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old March 21st, 2011, 11:34 AM   #50 (permalink)
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 143
 
Device(s):
Carrier: Not Provided

Thanks: 30
Thanked 19 Times in 12 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by AndreaCristiano View Post
Yes you are. The bandwidth is their property they own it. If they tell you this allotment can not be used for tethering unless you purchase this and you do it anyway that is making a modification to your usage arrangement with the company. Basically a breach of contract

The bandwidth is mine. I paid for it.

You're just back to arguing that the electricity company owns the electricity I paid for and they should be able to tell me how I can use that electricity because it's theirs (even though I paid for it).

You're just back to arguing that the water company owns the water I paid for and they should be able to tell me how I can use that water because it's theirs (even though I paid for it).
DannyB is offline  
Reply With Quote
Reply


Go Back   Android Forums > Android Carriers > AT&T
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:11 PM.
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.