Battery calibration: for good battery life


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  1. fireonhigh

    fireonhigh Well-Known Member This Topic's Starter

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    does this work?power cycling? Battery calibration: for good battery life - xda-developers calibration is simply done by running it down completely until the phone shuts off by itself...
    Then remove the battery, wait 10 seconds, insert again, repeat...
    If the phone shuts off again in less than a few minutes you're done.
    Now remove battery and hold power button for 1minute.then insert battery.dont switch on the phone. plug the charger and recharge the battery fully until the green light is on...[​IMG][​IMG]
    then remove battery,hold power button for few seconds,insert it and switch on the phone...[​IMG][​IMG]
    yes its done......[​IMG]
    do this initially once in 3-4months when the phone is new.then ince a month after a year to gain maximum battery performance...

    REMEMBER THIS WILL NOT DRAMATICALLY IMPROVE YOUR BATTERY LIFE....
    BUT THIS WILL SAVES YOUR NEW ONE TO BE DEAD BEFORE AGE[​IMG][​IMG]
    DONT EXPECT MORE FOR ALREADY SWOLLEN OR DIED BATTERY...
     

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  2. Frisco

    Frisco =Luceat Lux Vestra= VIP Member

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    There is disagreement amongst experts on that technique, fireonhigh.

    Calibration of the battery to the device's meter happens with normal use and repeated charging cycles, no matter how low the battery is drained when plugging in the charging cable. Lithium-Ion batteries do not suffer the "memory" issue that older Nickel-Cadium batteries did, so topping is not harmful and will not impact its charging capacity.

    I've always charged my LI batteries every night and have never experienced poor capacity or battery life.
     
  3. Mensaboy

    Mensaboy New Member

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    you would have to know for certain if it is a single cell battery or multiple cells in parallel

    it is so small that i doubt very much there are multiple cells inside the battery case

    going under the assumption that it is a single cell there is no need to "calibrate" the pack at all - conditioning/calibrating is what many have taken to dub the balancing of individual cells in a lithium battery pack

    the difference is most laptop batteries have multiple cells to achieve the higher voltage

    for example the laptop pack i have here is 6 cell 10.8v - so it is a series of 3 cells in parallel with another series of 3 (3 cells gets you the ~10.8 and 3 more doubles the mAh)

    with the pack fully charged, as you use the device the energy get released from all the cells with slightly different rates - however with MOST charging scenarios the voltage applied BACK to the pack during charging is equal to all cells, thus the cells that gave up their energy more easily have less in the tank when charging begins

    as the pack reaches full voltage the charging system (software on device) stops the flow when the pack reaches a certain voltage or drop to a specified amperage rate (this depends on weather or not the charging system uses constant current/constant voltage or not - i wont get into that)

    the pack will stop charging before it is truly topped off, because most of the current flowing into the pack near the end is only creating heat and gasses and it is simply a waste (as well as dangerous in certain cases)

    so every cycle of charging will inevitably result in the more efficient cells getting less and less charge due to the other packs starting out less discharged (more full at charge start)

    after many cycles this can lead to either the low cells actually dropping below the point at which they will accept a charge, or the pack never reaching full voltage to signal the charging system to stop charging - both of these condition likely mean a dead pack

    on this Powerbook here, Apple does recommend going through the procedure defined above, what this does is bring all the cells down to their lowest cutoff voltage(even the ones that didnt like to give it up), and the rebooting while dead confirms it - this way when the pack is charged next, all cells are starting off even and will accept roughly the amount of energy back in

    IMO this is a sloppy workaround for a broken charging scheme, the cells should all have their own individual connections and should be balanced on every charge cycle - this would prevent the inflated cracked broken burned up laptop packs (if you have ever seen a laptop pack swell,, this lack of balancing is what causes it generally)


    all that being said, with a single cell pack there is nothing to balance (condition, calibrate...whatever)
     

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