Does this have any implications on Rooting?


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  1. maxwellimus

    maxwellimus Well-Known Member This Topic's Starter

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  2. scary alien

    scary alien not really so scary Moderator

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    Interesting article. I don't think it will have too much impact since the devs are going to try to root and hack encrypted bootloaders anyway (i.e., to be able to install custom recoverys and ROMs) and folks are going to install them if available. I wonder if this obviates the root vs. warranty breakage issue...probably not, since the manufacturers still needs to be able to protect themselves from support issues that they are not responsible for.
     
  3. sic0048

    sic0048 Well-Known Member

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    It just means that users cannot be charged with a crime for rooting their phones. I also have to assume that it also means that developers cannot be charged with a crime for creating the tools needed to root a phone. I doubt this ever happened in real life, but I know Apple banned some Developers for assisting in rooting. That practice would probably have to stop now.

    It doesn't mean that manfacturers have to "open" their phones. So Motorola still has the right to manufacture phones with an encrypted bootloader.

    I also agree with SA that rooting still probably means voiding your warranty.
     

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