Fraud Activity - Looking for Help/Info


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  1. ToxicToastKatz

    ToxicToastKatz Well-Known Member This Topic's Starter

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    Hey Fellow Geekers,

    I have got a serious question that I'm hoping someone WAYYYY smarter than me can shed some light on. I'll try to be brief:

    About a month ago, I was having issues with my Hero. After spending a week of troubleshooting w/ the help of Sprint Tech Support over the phone, it was determined that my phone was malfunctioning and that it was faulty hardware. I was sent a refurb and sent the defective one back in the Sprint supplied envelope. I tracked the package on their website and it arrived safely and was logged in as such.

    About a week after that, my wife's Touch Pro wasn't holding a charge, so I took it over to the local Sprint repair location and asked them to take a look at it. They stated that the battery was fine, but would order me another one because I stated it just wasn't holding a charge. They weren't able to order a battery, but were instead able to offer a refurb Touch Pro 2 (we have insurance on both phones, BTW). I accepted and two days later, we made the swap.

    I don't remember the exact dates of the exchanges, but it was in late March/early April (I believe right around Opening Day for MLB).

    Then, on April 10th and 11th, I started received odd international phone calls and my phone was acting strange. Two of the callers left messages in foreign languages. I kept the messages on my phone because I thought it was rather odd, but never really thought much of it. I received a few more calls from the same number and programmed it into my phone so I could check the option under the contact to "Send all calls directly to voicemail" so as not to be bothered by obvious wrong numbers. A few days later, my wife received an odd international call at 6am. This was the only call of that nature. Naturally, we thought nothing of it after the fact.

    Fast forward to today. My wife calls me at work and asks if I changed something in our calling plan, because she's been unable to call her brother in San Diego (long distance call) and was unable to call a friend long distance last week. I advised her to call Sprint Tech, because something appeared wrong with her phone.

    I get a call back from my wife 10 minutes later, explaining to me that Sprint Tech advised her that our numbers (both mine and hers) had been flagged beginning on April 10th for suspected fraudulent activity. Apparently, someone had made $1300 worth of international phone calls between our numbers and an automatic long distance call restriction was placed on our numbers. Neither my wife nor I were ever notified of the restriction, or the suspected fraudulent activity. Had my wife not tried to call long distance, we would have never known.

    I called Sprint Customer Service (as their Fraud department is closed until Monday) and they were amazed that nobody had notified us of the restriction. They were also unable to shed any light as to how this could have happened or WHY we were never notified. The customer service rep than asked if I knew a particular man they had listed in as calling in about the account (albeit, calling about a different number....I have NO idea what that's about), and I had not.

    I am fairly concerned over this, as I can't get any information as to how this could have happened, or if any more of my information is vulnerable.

    For instance, is there a possible scenario where whoever is responsible for the calls could get my SS#? How about access to my phone's contents? I have no idea how a phone gets cloned, what that involves, or what accesses someone could get by doing that, so I'm' hoping someone here, either a tech savvy person, a Sprint Rep or someone who has experience with this (not the actual cloning, but a victim or fraud). Is cloning the only way that these calls could have been made? Is it a mere coincidence that after owning a cell phone for over 10 years and being with Sprint for 6, I am a victim of fraud not more than 2 weeks after swapping out 2 defective phones? Could someone at Sprint have used the ESNs from the defective devices?

    Again, I am sorry to be so long winded, but I am truly concerned about this and anyone who can shed some light and provide any possible information would really help me out.

    TIA
     

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  2. Jceinc

    Jceinc Well-Known Member

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    Very weird, please let us know the outcome.
     
  3. GiftedPlacebo

    GiftedPlacebo Well-Known Member

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    My wife's Sprint phone was cloned about 2 years ago. Suddenly our monthly bill shot to a couple grand. I called Sprint (they never notified me) and told them there was fraudulent activity on the account. They were pretty good about it, all the charges were reversed. IIRC they sent us something to sign saying we didn't make the calls.

    Back in the late 90's I was cloned literally dozens of times. It was apparently easier to do with analog phones and since I had a car phone which was always on, I was an easy target.
     
  4. ToxicToastKatz

    ToxicToastKatz Well-Known Member This Topic's Starter

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    Yea, I've talked to Sprint, and I have no worries about incurring any charges, as these are clearly fraudulent calls. My concern is if any other information is vulnerable. Obviously I'm a little uneasy about somebody using my number and racking up $1300 in calls, but I am worried that other information, or even the contents of my phone can be compromised.

    Is that even possible?
     
  5. GiftedPlacebo

    GiftedPlacebo Well-Known Member

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    Anything that was sent over the air would be vulnerable, ie voice calls & text messages.

    EDIT: Main concern would be incoming txt messages that could contain personal info. Apps like email and web browsers should function as a normal client/server and shouldn't be a risk.
     
  6. ToxicToastKatz

    ToxicToastKatz Well-Known Member This Topic's Starter

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    Howdy,

    Just wanted to update for anyone interested:

    Spoke to the Fraud department yesterday. Turns out, whoever did this, accomplished it by nabbing my PIN code (somehow) and created a false profile online on Sprint's website and just went to town.

    Luckily, there is no way for them to obtain any other information. All they were able to do was make outgoing calls. Incoming calls were not possible. I was also advised that OTA info (calls, texts, etc) were not able to be monitored or received by whomever was doing this either. Whether or not that is true, I'll just have to take their word for it.

    Anyway, issue has been resolved.

    On another note, just a nice little high-five for Sprint's customer service. I know they ALWAYS get a bad rap on here, and everywhere really, and I'm not sure why. I have always had good luck with Sprint and their CSRs. I spoke to a rep on Friday night who was unable to help me because he wasn't privy to the information I was looking for. He advised me that only the fraud department would be able to help. He said he understood my concern with my information being safe, but there was nothing he could do. He advised that I call fraud on Monday and that he would follow up with me when he got in on Monday afternoon to be sure I had received a resolution for my issue. Yesterday had come and in the afternoon, I received an "Unknown" call on my phone. I answer, and you know what....IT WAS HIM!! DOING EXACTLY AS HE SAID!! :) The reason I put that all in Caps is because I was truly happy that he followed through. To be honest, I had completely forgotten he was supposed to follow up, but he did. I think that speaks volumes. So, Ron White, I thank you for keeping your word and doing a great job!! :)

    It's truly funny that Sprint gets a bad rep regarding customer service. You want terrible customer service? Sign up for Comcast! I have been waiting for a call back from them (as promised) for 2 weeks now. That's another story for another time.....
     
  7. DonB

    DonB ♡ Spidey Sense !! ♡ ™ Moderator

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    Don't loose track that Sprint never called you in the first place to tell you that you had a call restriction on your phone, that should have been flagged immediately. :confused:


     
  8. ToxicToastKatz

    ToxicToastKatz Well-Known Member This Topic's Starter

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    hahahaha, I actually thought about that right after I posted. Duly noted :)
     
  9. nick325i

    nick325i Well-Known Member

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    Moral of the story. If you start getting weird international calls. Call Sprint immediately to check for fraudulent activities.
     
  10. SlothyUK

    SlothyUK Well-Known Member

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    Thx for the story on what could have turned out to be very ugly.

    Glad it worked out.
     
  11. SilHero

    SilHero Well-Known Member

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    yea htis happened to me about a month ago, i have 5 pones on my plan, and 3 of them got "hacked" into and sprint says i owe them $17,000 for calls to jamaica and dominican republic, lol.

    i made a claim into the fraud dept. and they changed all of our MSID #s, my sprint bill still says my balance is 17,000+ but they said they would take care of it...
     

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