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Future OS Releases


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  1. yankeeboy

    yankeeboy Well-Known Member This Topic's Starter

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    With being a wireless industry professional for 15 years now, I have come across many different types of devices, OS's, just about it all.

    I wanted to love Windows mobile - couldnt take the constant crashing.
    I wanted to love the Palm 650 - well, I wont even go into that...
    I gave Symbian (Nokia E61) about a minute with good intentions before I was bored...
    I loved my BlackBerry for years - feel like they are old school now...
    I would never use AT&T again, so the iPhone is out - love my iPod Touch though.


    Having just gotten my first Android device, I can honestly say that while I am very impressed with the OS and its capabilities, I long to understand some of the things left out of ANY of these operating systems....here are a few that I would like to understand if will be part of future releases:

    *Spell Checker - Seriously? This is so early 2000's.

    *The choice to actually EXIT an application - not just leaving it running in the background....I like multi-tasking just as much as the next guy, but shouldnt we be able to do this without adding Task Killers and scrolling through menu's to force close apps?

    *Battery Life - is someone going to figure this out anytime soon? I would think the person responsible would be like a multi-gagillionairre...

    *Enterprise Support out of the box....companies express to me daily that they dont want to invest in extra software anymore - they expect things to come with out of the box support - I would expect that in the 2.0 release that more inherent enterprise support would only grow user adoption..

    Just a few immediate thoughts - what are your thoughts?
     

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  2. galt

    galt Well-Known Member

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    Sigh...

    What amazes me is that MOT solved the battery problem by allowing battery swaps (Are you listening Apple?). But they did not provide a separate charger, so what good is it? With two batteries, one needs to be on charger while other is being used.

    Exiting a program is an application issue. Many apps are designed to "go to sleep" after initializing, Allowing user to kill them will have coinsequences. I have no problem with them sleeping, as long as they are really asleep. Keep in mind that this is multi-tasking OS, so a sleeping application could be expected to be there when another app signals it. Like the weather program expects GPS to be initialized. Now as far as releasing memory, that is up to the OS. I think the android design is fine in that respect.

    Didnt we get Enterprise support with 2.0? At least Exchange? I don't use it, so don't know what is fluff and what is real.

    My apps seem to have spell check. I don't know how they implemented it, but I guess it could be at the OS level for convenience even if not disciplined architecture. OTOH, Microssoft headed towards that with Office, and it was a big PITA.

    This whole discussion probably belongs in development.
     
  3. yankeeboy

    yankeeboy Well-Known Member This Topic's Starter

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    There is exchange support, yet very limited - no security to speak of whatsoever....

    I am impressed so far with what they have done, I just feel like whoever designs this stuff dont ever get any real feedback from actual users...
     
  4. galt

    galt Well-Known Member

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    In my mind 2.0 is really version 1.0, the same way windows came into its own as Windows 95, and THEN we got NT. My hope is that once they find a stable platform and have more developers up to speed, they can tighten security without crippling the system. The architecture may even be planned for it later on. It should be easy to replace one of the lower layers. Keep in mind that secure Linux was a long time coming, and even today is a rare thing.
     

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