Keep Android Open Petition! - Application in the Market

Discussion in 'Android Apps & Games' started by webby, Apr 3, 2009.

  1. webby

    webby Member
    25

    Mar 12, 2009
    20
    0
    25
    Phoenix, Arizona
    This is an application in the market. You download it and by leaving your comment, you are signing the petition to T-Mobile to keep Android Open. This in response to the recent action by Google in response to T-Mobile, pulling tethering apps from the Market.

    The application also has a link to a tethering app for rooted phones, and a link to email T-Mobile executives.
    [​IMG]
     

    Advertisement
  2. tiredhiker

    tiredhiker Well-Known Member
    36

    Jan 3, 2009
    189
    2
    36
    I have NOTHING good to say about T-Mobile!!!
     
  3. sergey

    sergey Well-Known Member
    53

    Mar 16, 2009
    422
    29
    53
    reducing the hate on Android and iPhone
    NYC
    I don't see what the big deal is- yes Android is open source and stands for more than the big tech companies doing business as usual. But all the companies involved are for-profit. It's business as usual.

    If Google allows enough apps that offers programs that compete with T-mobile's paid services, then T-mobile will drop Android and no carrier would agree to have Android in their line up- you're giving away free service.

    Besides, just because it's off the market doesn't mean you can't get these apps.
     
  4. tiredhiker

    tiredhiker Well-Known Member
    36

    Jan 3, 2009
    189
    2
    36
    UNDER LAW T-Mobile can not lock the phone to their service YET after I told them this 3 times they still refused to unlock my phone. I had to pay $30 online to get the unlock code AFTER I paid the full amount of $400 usd for that phone. If I paid full price It should not be locked in the first place! I asked them other question like differanmt FONTs for the G1 so I can get Vietnamese mail/test but all they say is wait. The FONTs are there and they are free but you need a Rooted phone to install them. Not fair... So much for OPEN...
     
  5. punkzanyj

    punkzanyj Well-Known Member
    128

    Oct 20, 2008
    1,012
    72
    128

    This "app" is so much bellyaching and unearned righteous indignation. There is such a huge amount of runaway sense of entitlement today, it's ridiculous. Tethering is against the T-Mobile TOS. Not allowing a tethering app in the official market, quite frankly, makes sense. The official market is no place for apps that are illegal or designed to undermine official service contracts. As many people have said, you can get the tethering apps elsewhere. If they were continued, I could see someone going nuts, getting cut off by T-Mobile and offering the lame excuse "but it was in the official Android Marketplace! I can't be against the rules!" They're just protecting themselves, and Android is protecting it's interests.

    It's amazing how many people don't have any concept of "open source". I remember people getting mad when the paid apps arrived and said "paid apps, but this is open source!" No, open source doesn't mean free. Now people think open source means "no rules".

    Open source merely means that the devs have open access to the source code, it doesn't mean anything else. It doesn't mean free, it doesn't mean no rules whatsoever, it just means better opportunity for development.
     
  6. RozzaC

    RozzaC Well-Known Member
    73

    Feb 25, 2009
    647
    10
    73
    Student
    London, UK
    I wanted to write something similar to what you wrote punkzanyj....

    But I just didn't have the energy.... xD

    Thanks for saying what I wanted to say.. (and more...)
     
  7. RozzaC

    RozzaC Well-Known Member
    73

    Feb 25, 2009
    647
    10
    73
    Student
    London, UK
    Oh yeah....I used to love that site =O
     
  8. LukiSpuki

    LukiSpuki Active Member
    16

    Nov 21, 2008
    32
    5
    16
    my thoughts exactlu punk =)

    now what are those non MP sites where we can get those apps?
     
  9. punkzanyj

    punkzanyj Well-Known Member
    128

    Oct 20, 2008
    1,012
    72
    128
    Another thought is this:
    T-Mobile is currently the only carrier bold enough to support Android.


    Now, how enticed to jump on Android would you be if you were Sprint, ATT, or Verizon and found out that the official Android Market has apps that will undermine your service agreement with your customers?

    How would you react if you heard that T-Mobile approached Android about the issue and Android did nothing.

    Would you, as Sprint, Verizon, or ATT be eager to add Android to your phones?

    In my opinion, this is something Android HAD to do if they wanted anyone else to carry phones with their OS.
     
  10. RozzaC

    RozzaC Well-Known Member
    73

    Feb 25, 2009
    647
    10
    73
    Student
    London, UK
    I like your thinking....
     
  11. Graham

    Graham Well-Known Member
    15

    Mar 23, 2009
    89
    0
    15
    Australia
    Yeah, signed it.
     
  12. phogster

    phogster Member
    5

    Dec 3, 2008
    8
    0
    5
    I'm sick of hearing people complain about the "sense of entitlement". You sound like old people complaining about young people wanting to dance.

    Times change. They're changing right now. And the rules are changing all the time. Relish your new freedoms and don't fear them. It used to be you had to pay for e-mail. It used to be you had to pay $20 for a CD.

    All the carriers are posturing to wait and see what customers are willing to pay for. What draws me to T-Mobile is open Android. If they start closing things up, I'm switching carriers as soon as my 1-year term is up.

    Everyone please vote by downloading and rating the app.
     
  13. punkzanyj

    punkzanyj Well-Known Member
    128

    Oct 20, 2008
    1,012
    72
    128

    Thanks for an example of what "unearned sense of entitlement" looks like.

    Oh, and trying to shame me with the label of "old" isn't going to work either. It's not my fault so many people didn't bother to learn what "Open Source" means. Hell, they know so little about it, they've shortened it to just "Open". Android and T-Mobile aren't responsible for people having unrealistic and counterintuitive expectations.

    No matter how you slice it, the tether apps had to go, and no petition is going to bring them back. The same goes for any other apps that threaten android's relationship with the current carrier and presents it as a liability for future carriers. That's not a good position for a new tech to be in.

    What would be more practical would be to petition T-Mobile directly regarding changing their tether policy.

    This petition basically demands that Android shoot itself in the foot. Can't blame them for not pulling the trigger.
     
  14. phogster

    phogster Member
    5

    Dec 3, 2008
    8
    0
    5
    If you want a closed platform whose first priority is to put money in the hands of big corporations while slowly disenfranchising both users and developers, please get an iPhone.

    As far as "liability for future carriers", you're making an assumption you can't possible back up. Like i mentioned in my post, company policy changes with user demand. Companies will back down if enough users are unhappy, a recent example is the broadband bandwidth-cap.

    Yes, tethering is not something the carriers want to see the users get for free, but it's gonna go the way of bank checking fees. Competition (and ease of implementation) will rule the day.
     
  15. punkzanyj

    punkzanyj Well-Known Member
    128

    Oct 20, 2008
    1,012
    72
    128
    They never said it was an open platform. Cite me the time, date when they said that. They said it was open source. Open Source means access to the source code, it doesn't mean chaos and anarchy.

    You don't get it dude, you really don't get it.

    ATT, Verizon, and Sprint are not going to invest in an OS that allows customers to violate the TOS. Especially when the app in question is allowed to be on the official market. They're not going to do it. Having apps, any apps, that violate T-Mobile's TOS presents an issue. If T-Mobile had approached Android and android said "no, sorry, we're not going to do that"....then Sprint, ATT, and Verzion would not bother with Android. Why? Because they'd be fools to do so. No company is going to invest their time and money into a product that will undermine it's customer agreements, it doesn't make practical sense. It doesn't make business sense. There are no benefits to the carriers for investing in Android if it's just going to lead to problems for them.

    Explain to me why any other carrier would bother with Android knowing that Android will allow apps on it's marketplace that undermine their customer agreements? They don't make these Terms Of Service Agreements on a whim or because they are bored. It has a lot to do with what services and features are the most cost effective and deliver the best ROI. Android violating their service agreements affects that ROI.

    Taking down the app presents Android in a way that is attractive to Sprint, Verizon, and ATT. It tells those carriers "we respect our client's agreements with their customers" It tells them that Android will respect those agreements.

    It's a smart business move, one that benefits everyone. If you can't see that, I don't know what to tell you.


    You may very well have a point. But petitioning Android isn't going to change that. It's going to be met with deaf ears, they have a responsibility to T-Mobile before they have one to you or any other person with a G1. Efforts to change tethering would be better and more fruitful if you engaged T-Mobile directly regarding this issue.

    Honestly, I think T-Mobile is simpy not ready for tethering. I think it has less to do with them not wanting to do it, and more to do with their data network, very much in it's infancy, not being able to handle it. So for now, it's forbidden, but perhaps when they're on the scale of ATT and Verizon, and they have the customer requests, they'll change it. But for now, it's not happening.
     
  16. pacothebandit

    pacothebandit Well-Known Member
    36

    Mar 11, 2009
    296
    6
    36

    Well said, Look at Verizon. They offer tether support through Blackberry's and other options, they also have a massive network to support that. I honestly believe that tmo not allowing tethering has more to do with the fact that they are just now getting 3G support to major cities and now you want to browse that with your laptop?? The bandwidth cannot support such a request. Whereas in the city i live in 45 minutes north of Seattle you can go just about anywhere and have 3G on Verizon's network.

    Someday Tmo will have a large data network and when that happens, who knows maybe they will allow tethering, but even if they don't there is no reason to hassle the guys at android...it doesn't make any sense and there is nothing they can do to change the TOS of the carrier....not when the want to protect that relationship as best as they can.

    nuff said, im going to sleep now...
     
  17. Norrick

    Norrick New Member
    5

    Apr 18, 2009
    4
    0
    5
    i dont see what the big deal is, my windows mobile phone would allow it.

    heaven forbid we actually use our "unlimited" data plan.
     
  18. punkzanyj

    punkzanyj Well-Known Member
    128

    Oct 20, 2008
    1,012
    72
    128
    was your windows mobile phone 3G, though? Probably not, as the G1 is their first 3G capable phone, launched with their 3G network.

    I had the T-Mobile wing, and it even had a built in app for tethering -- but that phone wasn't 3G capable, only edge, and their edge network is everywhere(or at least in more places than 3G). Big difference between allowing people to tether on Edge, and allowing them to tether on a 3G network that's still being built.
     

Share This Page

Loading...