Recovering Linux Partition


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  1. mhrc4

    mhrc4 Well-Known Member This Topic's Starter

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    So quick background on me to get some of the basics out of the way, 10 year IT professional as a Sr. Systems consultant and currently a Systems Engineer at a 10k+ user multi-national retail organization. Main areas of expertise are Microsoft server technologies, AD, Exchange, etc and VMware's suite of products.

    With that being said, I am very well versed in MS products, but not a lot of exposure (read: very little) to Linux. I apologize in advance for the long post, I have done a lot of troubleshooting and want to make sure I detail what I have already tried so hopefully someone can tell me where I went wrong *(other than by buying a Lacie)

    So here is my problem. Bought a Lacie Network Attached Storage drive right about a year ago (basically, the old version of this.) Pretty basic setup, tossed it on my LAN, IP addressed it, good to go.

    This worked well for my 4-5 computers on my LAN, until about a week ago, the drive started making odd noises, etc. I backed up 90% of my data on the drive to my desktop and my wife's desktop, so 2 additional copies of the data.

    Well, as of yesterday, the drive is dead, or at least I cannot get to it over the network. After a reset, I can get to the admin GUI and network drives for about 2 minutes before it goes offline again. My guess, after some experience with these, the hardware NIC failed, or the Linux partition that runs the drive/network card failed.

    So I bought a SATA to USB dock, took the Hitachi 1Tb drive out, and connected it to my Windows 7 computer. Drive Management sees the attached drive, and details it with about 8 partitions of varying sizes, with the biggest being the main storage space of about 900Gb. Obviously, Windows cannot read the drives without extra help, so I did a few quick searches and came up with some alternatives.

    I tried using a few EXT2FS drivers to read the drive, but they were only able to read 2 or 3 of the 8 partitions, which, I somewhat expected. The boot partition can be read, as well as the main Linux file system, just not the large storage drive.

    Does anyone have any advice for something I could try, a tool, a USB bootable Linux distro (for a Windows user :)), something to see if I can recover that last 10% off the drive?

    Thanks in advance.
     

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  2. mhrc4

    mhrc4 Well-Known Member This Topic's Starter

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    oh, the joys of an engineering mind. Apparently all i needed to do was type out and think through what I had done, and what my options were.

    I have a netbook I had forgot I had loaded Jolicloud on (Jolicloud) and though it installs through Windows and edits the boot.ini, it is a Linux based OS. I was able to plug in my USB dock to this OS and can actually see the contents of my entire drive.

    Now just to figure out how to get them off of this drive and over to my desktop. :)
     
  3. hiteck

    hiteck Active Member

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    There are some good utilities for Linux partitions.
     
  4. Hangdog42

    Hangdog42 Well-Known Member

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    You might have a look at UNetbootin. It makes bootable USB sticks and has a variety of Linux distros ready to load. Given that most Linux distros can read and write to NTFS drives, you could boot your Win7 machine from the USB stick and copy over. I'd suggest using either Linux Mint, Ubuntu or Puppy Linux if you want to go with a small distro.
     
  5. Eugene

    Eugene Well-Known Member

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    Could setup a simple samba share off your linux OS as well then just copy over the network.
    What FS is on the drive, I'm surprised a tool like ext2fs couldn't read it.
     

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