Review: My take on the Android OS and the Galaxy


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  1. KlaymenDK

    KlaymenDK Well-Known Member This Topic's Starter

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    Hi all,
    I figured I wanted to write a review after using the OS for a little while. I actually did do a writeup as I learned my way around, but it got lost (GMail Drafts usability issue) so here's a new version. Beware: it's long; but I do think it will be all the more complete for it.

    My background
    I've been using PalmOS for years and years, my first device was a Palm III and I loved it; I called it my 'plastic brain' then, and ever since. After that came a brief period with a Psion Revo (which was perhaps even better, but died much too soon of hardware issues).

    Lately, I've had a couple of refurbished Palm Tungsten T3's with the absolutely fabulous collapsible display. Its capability to do transparent full-screen handwriting recognition is simply superior to everything I've tried to this day, and the five programmable hardware buttons gave me instant access to almost every app on the device.

    Eventually, I got annoyed by having a pda and a phone as two separate devices, so I grabbed an old Treo 680 from eBay, which I had refurbished and still own. Beyond the obvious phone capability, the Treo has all the OS niceties of the T3, but a much smaller display and an ugly but quite useful keyboard, but sadly no wifi or fast internet.

    For completeness, I must also mention that my twin brother used (up!) five Psion Series5's over the last 13 years. Earlier this year, he gave up on continually refurbishing them and switched to an iPhone.

    Making the switch
    As you may know, Palm pulled the rug away from under a quite thriving user community, so I figured I had better cut my losses and get with the times. My needs could be described, roughly, as a modern pda with a built-in phone. A camera and internet ability would be nice but not all that critical. However, I did intend to write some apps for myself (as I did for my Palm), and preferably in an environment that was straightforward, didn't cost a lot, and ran on linux.

    The major contenders seemed to be iPhones, Symbian-based Nokias, the Openmoko, and some Android-based phone. Taking a closer look, iPhones were prohibitively closed and expensive (optimally, you need the full Mac treatment); Symbian seemed sound but a little obscure, but the fatal blow was (is) that the SDK is only available for Windows; the Openmoko is magnificently idealistic and ultimately open, but frankly years away from day-to-day dependability; and the Android path, while sounding impressive, was pretty much a dark horse, and also led unavoidably to a Google account (which I was/am squeamish about trusting). Evidently, I was going to have to compromise.

    That turned out to be easier said than done. I had set up my requirements based not on the ability of devices currently on the market, but on what I could do with my old device. I was in for a shock -- in nearly all aspects except internet access, it seemed that ability had regressed by many years, and some features which I had considered obvious were not even to be found! It seemed that users were generally awed by bling and prettiness rather than "hardcore" road-warrior pda features.

    To be brief, I decided on an Android-based phone, and furthermore decided to wait a couple of months for the release of the Samsung Galaxy, because its sleek form and gorgeous screen appealed to me (and still do!). Meanwhile, I set up a Google account. I had rather a lot of trouble getting all my contacts into GMail, because apparently the import/export feature only covers about a third of the fields a contact can store. Odd. I never tried to migrate my calendar, choosing instead to manually enter what I could think of.

    First off, I was obscenely impressed by the device, the display, the smoothly rendered graphics, and the general newness of the experience. It was a slight surprise to find that the "Location" setting also determines the language used by the OS, so that I am pressed to pretend I'm in the UK (this is inaccurate, but quite acceptable). Luckily, there is a separate setting for the time zone, so all is well.

    The Galaxy
    Note: This section was added in a later version; the review initially was almost entirely about the OS.
    I would be tempted to say that the phone, physically, lives up to typical modern-day standards. That is to say, the gadget is very compact (thinner than an iPhone) and is dominated by a display that is huge (though slightly smaller than the iPhone's, to end the comparison), very brilliant, and even power-lean. These three factors (ignoring the parentheses) were the main reasons I opted to hold out a few months for a Galaxy instead of a device that was already in shops in my home country. In retrospect, I don't think I would have liked an HTC phone, so it seems like a good choice. I've never enjoyed e-book reading so much since my Psion Revo broke, it really is a fine device for it.

    Looking closer at the device: It's been criticised for its old-fashioned design, but I like that things generally are where you expect them to be. Granted, the "Call" and "End" buttons are placed rather low and you must take care not to drop the device; but with a screen like that, buttons are bound to be quite near the edges. I thought I'd like the "Lock" side button, but I am 'merely' satisfied with it (that is to say, I don't hate it with a passion as I've read others do). I think it's pretty slick that there's hardly any indication of how to open the device: there's no awkward "press to explode" tab; instead, you just palm the device and slide your hands in opposite directions. Neat, effective, clean. While we're on the subject, you need to take off the back cover to access the memory card slot; for me that's not an issue but others might want to swap more often. I do miss the hardware slider to enable silent mode that is the epitome of the Treo; in fact I do miss (as I knew I would) a few more purpose-made hardware buttons in general, but that comes later. One more thing that's obviously missing is a signalling LED, so one doesn't need to pick it up and turn it on to see if you've missed a call or received a message.

    The device comes with a quite adequate standard protector in the form of a plastic "sock" with a small cut-out for the speaker. Apparently, there ought to be one more cut-out, because reportedly the camera button, when half pressed in by the protector, drains the device's battery when it ought to be sleeping. This can really not be justified, it's a silly issue that should have been caught by Samsung QA -- or at least have been fixed in any of the 7 or so newer firmware versions. Of course, a protector is not really necessary, with the display being made of scratch-proof glass; it just avoids scratches to the rest of the case which is made out of plastic (and attracts finger prints like you wouldn't believe, but that's of no functional consequence).

    The built-in camera has higher resolution than my 'real' digital camera (a Casio Exilim compact), and less optical barrelling too. Naturally, my camera beats it on capture modes such as red-eye reduction and long-exposure night modes, but overall I am very impressed by the quality of images it produces. One gripe: tilting the phone in photo display mode usually has undesired effects; the device doesn't use its G-sensors, so pictures taken in landscape mode are displayed scaled down and orthogonal to the display. This is just another stone in the shoe of the firmware; one that we can hope will be shaken out by a later update.

    The modern sensor capabilities are great fun! It's neat to have a compass, a spirit level, and a metal detector in your pocket 'just because you can'. Wifi, GPS, G-sensors, Shazam, and QR barcode scanner apps really makes you think you're in the future, and I can't wait to see how apps will make use of these within the next couple of years, though obviously we already have the flatulence and light sword apps covered.

    Coming back to the battery, it is no surprise that it does not live up to its advertised longevity (well, it does if you just leave it on a desk in standby, but where's the fun in that?). Initially, I would get a few hours of use out of a charge (I would think it would be even worse with a regular LCD display). With a bit of practice (and abstemiousness) you can get three days' use out of it, but mostly you'd be well advised to charge it every night and, if you use it for commute entertainment, at the office. If you work out in the open, you can't rely on having enough juice left for use Google Maps to find an after hours bar, and frankly that's just poor. In the olden days we had week-long battery life; I know that we had neither GPS nor Facebook integration back then, but in my opinion this is a poorly balanced trade-off.

    Sadly, my device has a very poor compass, being out of alignment by usually no less than ten degrees and often more than 90. Even worse, within the first two months my G-sensors went bonkers and some plain flat-lined. I've now sent my phone for warranty, but it's evident that this would have been much, much simpler if I had bought it in a real store in my own country.

    Back to the software side of things.

    The Market
    It's bloody brilliant, if you'll excuse my language. I mean, from the Palm community I was, admittedly, quite spoiled with an infinitude of applications for every conceivable purpose, and most of it free or very cheap (I think the only apps I paid any noteworthy amount for were my Bonsai outliner, my BackupMan automatic backup, and my TealScript handwriting customizer; and they were worth every cent). In Android, you not only have nearly the same multitude of apps (already!), you even have it all in one convenient place. Okay, it would be real nice with alphabetic sorting, but Barcode Scanner makes that a moot point. While I'm on the subject of the Market, I don't know what we're waiting for before we can have paid apps in more countries, but from what I've read you even get a 24-hour trial period on paid apps. Eat that, iPhone! In fact, eat that, just-about-any-other-platform! And, if you're still not happy, you can just pass around apk files manually. Simply unbeatable.

    Alas, I soon found that I was struggling with the user interface.

    Desktop
    I had thought that the several desktops were, well, a bit of bling, and the Hero's seven screens were quite excessive. But no: there is no way to sort, control, or quickly access the applications in the "drawer"; adding and removing apps even change the position of everything else in the list, so you can't just fixate your stare on 'the left half five lines down, where it used to be'. Similar to the Android drawer, the Launcher I knew from PalmOS also provided alphabetic sorting only, but at least let you use user-configurable "categories" to sort your apps into a number of sub-lists. As any Palm user already knows, this concept of "categories" was an OS-level feature that was pervasive to any app, be it a calendar, address book, or shopping list. Back in Android, it seems that making desktop shortcuts is pretty much the only way to get fast access to the most frequently used apps; in short order, I ran out of icon space. Hm.

    Another compounding factor is the lack of programmable hardware keys. The hardware bit lends surface contours for your fingers to instinctively find, identify, and press. In comparison, on my Palm I had: a side button which could start the voice recorder or toggle keyboard backlighting, four application buttons, and the green "answer call" button; all of these could be more or less programmed to an application of choice. One of my apps was a button launcher which layered additional levels of button presses to further extend the number of launchable apps. At current count, with three clicks or less I can start any of twenty-six applications on the Palm. I say this not to brag, but to put into perspective that these were all functions that, in Android, would have to be replaced by desktop icons (which, mind you, don't offer tactile feedback). Clearly, I was facing a limited feature set.

    As a final note on this sad topic, I just want to point out that all Android --and iPhone-- commercials and demonstrations include shots of users happily swiping through pages and pages of icons. This is pure bling. It does feel absolutely great to browse around while saying, I am master of all I survey, but usually I just want to switch to that other app, like, now, you know? Honourable mention goes to the Recent Applications switcher, which comes in handy some of the time.

    Scale of UI controls
    This is an odd point to have to make, but I wouldn't have if it wasn't so ... noticeable. There's no end to the amount of required swipe-scrolling of lists, and I can't help noticing that, especially given the extremely sharp and high-density display, they could have made the fonts 1/3 the size. And what's with the separators that take up almost a full line height, and simple check boxes that are a full square centimetre? Compress it! Oh right, you're limited to the crummy accuracy of your fat fingertip which, inconveniently, obscures the thing you're pointing at. I was amazed that there wasn't a way to calibrate the touch screen to shift the 'perceived touch point' to the very tip of my finger where I could see what I hit, instead of smack underneath the centre of my nail. Hmm, less than ideal. Especially dealing with the keyboard, this meant I was constantly hitting keys one place further right than I intended, and it took me more than two weeks to get my finger calibrated for acceptable accuracy. More on the keyboard later, though.

    To make matters worse, it dawned upon me how much productivity the PalmOS can thank combo boxes for. With combo boxes, you can see what the current setting is, you tap, drag, and release, and then you see the new setting (or a different view of your app, or whatever). In Android, the UI guideline seems to be to instead use a button (or menu item) which brings up a (sub)menu with choices. This means two (sometimes three, if there's an OK button too) taps, and more frequently than not, you have to tap it just to see what the current setting is. Android could benefit from greatly promoting the use of combo boxes.

    Keyboard
    As I already said, the Market is great: I quickly located the Scandinavian Keyboard and its matching Danish Dictionary, and I was flying. Only one thing could have made it better: I have yet to find a Norwegian Dvorak layout, although it would be an understatement to say that that's a niche request. As I also said, in the beginning I suffered heavily (now I only suffer moderately) from hitting keys next to the ones I meant to press. I guess I'm too fat-fingered or motorically challenged, which I'll have to deal with. Overall, I knew that a virtual keyboard was going to be a lesser experience than my accustomed (and personalized) handwriting recognition, so I was fully prepared to take my expectations down a notch. I am confident that, if Android ever gets multi-touch, it will benefit the virtual keyboard immensely.

    Still, I had not anticipated just how little screen real estate would be left over for the application when popping up the virtual keyboard. More applications than you'd think suffer horribly from this, and I often find myself wishing for a real, external keyboard (G1 users, appreciate what you have). Even worse, when using the bigger keyboard of the landscape mode, the app is hidden entirely, to be replaced by a single text edit box. I guess I hadn't thought this through, nor understood the true effect when reading and watching reviews: many apps (for instance, chat apps) become nigh-on useless, because you have to constantly hide the keyboard to see what the other guy is typing (or whatever your app is doing). This is a real drawback and costs a lot of 'review points' for me.

    I am extremely glad to have seen one or two handwriting apps, because they give me great hope for the future (and would recoup more than the points lost in the previous paragraphs). As it is, they need visible input areas as large as the virtual keyboards (viz, they're not transparent), and I struggle to enter some specialized characters (say,
     

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  2. KlaymenDK

    KlaymenDK Well-Known Member This Topic's Starter

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    The above post may be edited and amended as time goes by.
    Edit 20091018: Added section on the Galaxy, and a paragraph regarding date selector.
    Edit 20091019: Misc. touch-ups.
    Edit 20091214: At last, I think my phone is now stable, but it is definitely the last Samsung product I will ever buy.
    Edit 20091217: Added section "Phone book vs. Address book".
    Edit 20100117: Added section "Post script" below.
    Edit 20100210: Added jab about multitasking-induced slowness.
    Edit 20100305: Added gripe about poor battery monitoring capabilities.

    As a footnote, I would like to add that, yes, I know I probably come across as not very content. Well, I'm not; Android is not ideal for me. (I frequently make the point that what's currently the best option may not in fact be a good option.) Still, I urge you all to not flame me on that account. I have been earnest, and those are my experiences within my frame of reference.

    On the other hand, polite and objective criticism is very welcome, as are any questions you might wish to ask.

    Post script
    The review was written based on the unmodified Galaxy running the unmodified Android OS (granted, with a number of apps installed). Now that I've been using the Galaxy for a while, I am doing some things differently. So if you have a comment to something of the above, here's where you can see if I've already addressed that issue.
    - I'm still not using any form of screen or case protector. All I have is a lanyard to lessen the risk of dropping it.
    - I have installed the "K4" version firmware, which is the first with which I've had any semblance of stability.
    - I have installed the "rectools" recovery partition, which allows me to do full system-wide backups and restores. It also allows me to root my phone, which I have not yet seen a need for.
    - I have installed "PandaHome" as my default home app, which gives me more screen space for desktop icons.
    - I have installed "CalWidget", which is what the stock Calendar widget should have been. If you're using the stock widget, go get CalWidget now. Seriously.
    - I have installed "Battery Left", which seems to actually provide a dependable battery reading. (Note: The screenshots at Androlib do not do it justice, it's actually very nice to look at.)
    - I have installed "Apps Organizer", which, according to reviews, one-ups the stock Folders and more or less offers the "categories" feature that I'm missing from the Palm. After a few days of use, it has obsoleted the stock "drawer" completely.
     
    reinbeau likes this.
  3. torbengb

    torbengb New Member

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    A minor correction: I didn't use up five Psions, but I did use three and had each one repaired a few times.

    My first Psion Series 5 was on duty from 1997 to 2002 when it was demoted to being a backup device for a used Series 5mx, which in turn broke down in 2008. By then the Series 5 was broken too and I replaced both with a third, a Series 5mxPRO which got replaced by an iPhone 3G in Feb'09. So that's:
    Series 5 8MB --> Series 5mx 16MB --> Series 5mx PRO 32MB --> iPhone 3G 16GB.

    I'm fairly happy with the iPhone, in a sort of Star Trek'ish way. It allows me to do everything, except proper fast typing, and finding alien life forms. Okay, the Psions couldn't find aliens either.

    I dislike that the iPhone is so obviously targeted at media consumption rather than at content creation -- oh no we'll never allow Bluetooth keyboards! It's nice to be online always, but I miss the olden Psion days when I wrote entire letters and articles (pages and pages!) on the device itself, at full speed.

    Oh, and the Psions regularly went three weeks on a battery charge. The iPhone barely lasts a single day.
     
  4. Jayziac

    Jayziac Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the thoughtful review. Wish the people at Google were monitoring things and hopefully implements some of the improvement ideas.
     
  5. chris76

    chris76 Active Member

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    Face it: you purchased a prototype and not a mature product, that is for both Android and the hardware.

    Once you recognize it, your quality of life will improve.

    Mutitasking could work but at slow motion with the CPU you have. A software update may do things worst, not for the bug fixing, but for the functionality and speed.
     
  6. KlaymenDK

    KlaymenDK Well-Known Member This Topic's Starter

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    Err, no. Prototypes are for alpha testing, or tech demos. A device/os sold en masse at retail is certainly no prototype.

    What I have realised, is that to some extent Android, and to a large extent the Galaxy, is beta quality. This realisation has not improved my quality of life; if anything, it aggravates me to no end because I'm not exactly able to get my money back, am I? It just shows how much things have gone backwards while claiming to be progress. And that makes me feel so very old...
     
  7. Rastaman-FB

    Rastaman-FB Well-Known Member

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    strange comment, the cpu is a standardised qualcom 7200a 528mhz cpu found in the dream, hero, tatoo.
    it suffers from less ram, recent software updates have fixed things including speed and functionality.
    its not a prototype either it does well as a device if you know about android and dont have expectations past that of what android can currently support.

    looking at the above review is pretty fair but its aimed more at standard cupcake than it is at the galaxy itself.

    Klaymen had higher expectations as hes come from a pda thoroughbred background where palm have moved from pda to phone rather than phone to pda.
    Android is not pda standard yet and so some of the things he is looking for just does not exist on any android format in the way that he would like them.

    personally I knew what to expect from Android and knew what i was getting into with my Galaxy

    in contrast i have an extremely stable phone customised to the max with a cooked rom and i can honestly say that i love every aspect of my phone (now i worked out what was drainig the battery).
    have had iphone, SE w810,nokia 95 black etc etc. and find the move to this a refreshing but familiar change

    i think its all relative to your previous phone history and expectations

    his review reflects his opinion due to what hes had before, i think its pretty fair but more aimed at android as a whole
     
  8. chris76

    chris76 Active Member

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    I agree with you regarding the beta quality; sorry - maybe I did not use the right words. I also believe you cannot get your money back because the system performs as published and Samsung is fixing the bugs, which is fine. Android is improving too; I use it every day. With the time we will get better (and stable) products. Regarding the speed, RAM size and other cent saving the manufacturers are doing to compete, it is very clear for me that the available phones will have a short life. Try to install Vista in a 6-year old PC and you will understand what I am talking about.

    By now, just try to enjoy what you have.
     
  9. KlaymenDK

    KlaymenDK Well-Known Member This Topic's Starter

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    Yes, I did intend to write more about the phone, but it was beginning to be a long session. I have now added section on the Galaxy, and a paragraph regarding the date selector.
     
  10. sergey

    sergey Well-Known Member

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    And this is why I'm not using Android. But I had a chance to play around with a friend's Sprint HTC Hero. Big improvement over the G1.
     
  11. DonnyIrish

    DonnyIrish Member

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    Nice write-up Klaymen,

    Informative and opinionated, what I would expect to see from someone who has used another product for a long time and compared it to something new on the market. It's nice to finally see a wall of text that has meaning and is well thought of beforehand.
     
  12. chrs

    chrs Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the very helpful review. You just convinced me to stay with Palm for now--I've now started shopping for used/refurbished Palm devices.

    Anyone care to compare notes on which obsolete Palm device is a good choice? I have a dying Sony Clie PEG-TJ37 which is pretty hard to beat, and pretty hard to find. It has a camera and WiFi and is very thin. The WiFi quit working fairly early on, and was always a big battery drain so I never used it that much. The camera is very low-resolution, but I still find it useful. I'm considering seeking out another TJ37, or a Zire 72, which has no WiFi, is not as thin, but has a better camera. The T3 or TX are also options, but I can't really see dropping the camera altogether if I can find a TJ-37.

    Sorry if it's silly to be discussing this here. I think in another 6 months to one year, there may be the right Android apps and devices to make it worth switching, so it might be silly to buy anything right now, but I'm not sure my TJ-37 will make it that long--the case is falling apart, the connector is flakey, the battery is almost shot...
     
  13. KlaymenDK

    KlaymenDK Well-Known Member This Topic's Starter

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    You are most welcome. :)

    I sold my Tungsten T3's and kept my Treo 680 -- now that I have an Android phone, I wish I had kept a T3.

    I would definitely recommend a T3 -- huge screen, but can collapse to pocket size. It's also got a sturdy metal case and a voice recorder. On the downside, it's got no wifi (The TX has wifi, but doesn't collapse and has no mic). Neither of them have a camera, so if that's a dealbreaker then I don't know.

    [Edit: Here's a very nice review if you want to know what I'm talking about.]
     
  14. lekky

    lekky Lover VIP Member

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    I think you should make clear that you are talking specifically about the Galaxys ability to run the android OS. Things such as making a calendar appointment taking longer than 2 minutes is fine if thats true for the Galaxy, but its most definitely not true for other android devices.

    Quite a few of the things you found annoying can actually easily be fixed, for example you running out of space for icons on the desktop. The galaxy actually gives you the option to add folders to your desktop, and store app shortcuts in these. You would then not run out of space and you can organise them anyway you like. (There are also a few free apps that add extra functionality on top of this).

    The browser limitation you said is another issue I have a problem with. I'm doubtful if the galaxy does this, but android certainly doesn't pause page loading you are not focused on. And if it did, any browser app on the market would fix the problem in an instant!

    But I'm not trying to moan, just point a few things out :p (I understand that Samsung haven't quite got to grips with android yet!)
     
  15. chrs

    chrs Well-Known Member

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    That's very helpful to know...but I haven't found a thread where people are saying how great and easy to use the calendar is...

    Here's a thread where people are discussing the lack of good calendar apps:
    http://androidforums.com/android-lounge/33476-question-about-calendar-contacts.html

    On another thread (http://androidforums.com/motorola-droid/14737-droid-calendar.html) Readflea had these recommendations:
    I'd love to try them but am not buying a device until I'm sure it makes sense to do so...
     
  16. lekky

    lekky Lover VIP Member

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    The problem then is its too simple to use, doesn't have all the features. I don't create corporate appointments on my Hero, but I do sync them from activesync. That works great for me.

    But I wasn't trying to say it was perfect, just that the timing issue is probably more a symptom of the Galaxy not android. If that aspect of the calendar is important (and i'm sure it is if one has an important use for the calendar) then I'd say get what meets your need!

    (I only wanted to clear some points of the review up!)
     
  17. KlaymenDK

    KlaymenDK Well-Known Member This Topic's Starter

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    Chris,
    the CalWidget is just brilliant, check out these screen shots. I use it as a 3x3 widget on my home screen. In my book this widget is a must-have.

    lekky,
    Yes, application shortcuts are a big issue for me; I don't think folders are very easy to work with and don't really solve the problem.
    - For the record, I am now running "PandaHome" which allows me to have 5 (up to 11) screens instead of just 3, and to use 3 (up to 6) extra side drawers, and unlike folders they automatically close when you launch an app.
    - Before using PandaHome, I came across "More Icons" which increases the icon density by putting 4 (well, 3) icons in the space of just one.
    - I'm also looking into "Apps Organizer", which seems to more or less do the "categories" bit for the application list that I'm missing from the Palm.
     
  18. lobug

    lobug Banned

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    Went from a Treo (Palm OS) to G1, and realized that "snappiness", "fast", "speed", "instantly" just have another meaning on these next generation mobile OSes...

    It seems to me it's not just hardware-related, even the Nexus One demo I watched on the Net still have those "slowdowns". The more serious problem is that, not enough efforts have been put into making handling everyday tasks as simple and as fast as possible.

    Instead, effort is put into making fancy things and fancier UI.

    It's strange that the good ol' Palm has mastered it literally 10-year ago. The PIM apps on Android (and anyone thinks I'm Android-bashing, webOS and iPhone suffer as well) look like 20-year old. No compressed view, poor date/time picker, no task support, no memo support, poor recurrence handling.

    I used to make quick notes in less than 10s with the Treo, now, I may prefer writing down the notes with paper and pen.

    If it were not that the Treo was dying, I probably would have stuck with it for far longer. Sadly, all the modern mobile OS suffer from the same problems.

    I'll finish this with an anecdote experience - I used to handle app my PIM tasks on the Treo even when I had my laptop in front of me, cause Outlook just doesn't cut it when it comes to speed and simplicity and functionalities. Now, I usually handle them with Google Calendar instead of on my phone, it's faster and easier to use them in a web app instead of a native app, which speaks for volume if you ask me.
     
  19. KlaymenDK

    KlaymenDK Well-Known Member This Topic's Starter

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    Well said, lobug. I fully agree. (And to think, I could have put it that succinctly instead of writing pages and pages! :p)
     
  20. Steve_Roome

    Steve_Roome New Member

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    Thanks for the review which I found very useful. I am still deciding which phone to buy as I too dont want to have to carry a PDA and a phone.

    I have been using Palms every day since I aquired an IBM Workpad (a rebadged PalmPilot Pro) in 1999. Since then I have had a Palm V, a Tungsten T3 and I am now using a TX.

    I would recommend a TX over a T3 because they are more reliable. Its also quite difficult to take a T3 apart and you are probably going to have to replace the battery to get decent battery life. The downside of a TX is that it doesnt have a camera and the sound quality is poor compared to other Palms.
     
  21. KlaymenDK

    KlaymenDK Well-Known Member This Topic's Starter

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    You're most welcome, Steve. People need to know what they're getting themselves into, right? :)

    Do you still use your Palm, then? If so, my advice would be to stick with that and go on carrying two devices, rather than trading them in -- at least for a Galaxy.

    By the way, do you still have your T3, or did you sell it?
     
  22. Markiz

    Markiz Well-Known Member

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    It is amazing how much effort you put into this, but, frankly, i stoped reading here.
    YOU ARE SCARED OF OPENING A GOOGLE ACCOUNT?
    Jesus.. What possible reason could anyone have for that? I can name a few, but i dont want to be name callng. I am aware that there where some riots about google thaking over the unverse, but it is just ridiculous.
     
  23. Steve_Roome

    Steve_Roome New Member

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    Hi

    I used the T3 until it was beyond repair and binned the remains. Still using the TX every day.

    Steve
     
  24. reinbeau

    reinbeau Klaatu barada nikto VIP Member

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    KlaymenDK, great writeup and you're thoughts mirror many of mine. I'm on a Captivate now, but I'm still going to carry and use my Garmin iQue for the foreseeable future, this phone is fun, but the PIM function of my Palm OS device is just too important to play with on this platform. Once CESD of Datebk6 fame comes out with the Android platform I'll be using the Captivate more for the calendar, but until then.....and I'd also love to find a truly robust address book program, ala PhoneMagic.
     

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