software development for a novice...


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  1. quest7

    quest7 Well-Known Member This Topic's Starter

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    Coming from someone who last took programming in the 80's, don't laught, how hard is it to pass software development? Starting classes in Sept. Also, any tips or advice to make this easier? Thanks.:)
     

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  2. Tosko

    Tosko Active Member

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    What I do when I want to study a new scripting lanuage is,

    I first read through the basic commands of that language so that I have a global idea what the commando's are.

    Then I grab a pre-scripted file and i start to read that and try to figure out what that person is trying to do with that piece of script.

    Once you can read it, then it's time to edit files. Once you get the hang of that, you start an easy script on your own.

    I'm not sure what scripting language you're going to learn but Photoshop Tutorials, Flash Tutorials and More! P2L Tutorial Search is a really good website.
     
  3. quest7

    quest7 Well-Known Member This Topic's Starter

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    When I start school, I will be taking c++ and java. Sad part is I don't own my own pc yet. So i use my phone mostly to surf for info. thanks.
     
  4. DKYang

    DKYang Well-Known Member

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    I'm not a professional and almost finished with getting my degree, but here's my opinion.

    When you get the hang of one language, it's easier to learn other languages because most of the concept is the same. C++ is a good language to start at IMO.

    If you want to take a look at some books, here is what I recommend.

    C++ How to Program by Deitel
    Murach's Java SE 6

    Murach's book is great. It has example codes on almost every single page of the book and he also makes those codes available on his site.

    Right now I'm taking an "advanced java" class (that's the actual name). Everything that I learned in C++ helped me a lot so right now I'm just cruising through the class. Just don't make it harder than it needs to be. I did that a lot in data structures now that I think back, but that's a different story.
     
  5. Creegz

    Creegz Member

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    I'm actually looking into doing the same thing. I have a C# book on my ottoman that I've not touched in a while. I haven't had the drive or time to do so. But, i have noticed since I did a lot of web code, a few general principles remain, so I can read and understand what's going on better than the dude down the street who's never seen a line of code. I find Flash was a simple little introduction, but it's very visual oriented, naturally....Something like C# or C++ is a great way to go, and just slowly move with that in some basic forms to get the idea of what you're in for.

    C++, C#, Java, Python, and ActionScript are some of the most common and popular forms of programming. I might actually sit down with my Java book sooner or later, granted this java book is up to date. My grandfather lent it to me. Java 2.0, which I hope is up to par.
     
  6. big_z

    big_z Well-Known Member

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    C++ sucks. Don't use it as a step to learn Java, unless your school makes you do it that way. If you want to learn Java (or C#, or whatever) just learn it. Don't learn one language just to learn another. Things that are business as normal in one language could be useless or worse in another.
     
  7. Tosko

    Tosko Active Member

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    I don't think he referred to that. When you know a certain scripting language, it's easier to learn another language.
     
  8. mkeath

    mkeath Well-Known Member

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    Don't take this advice. It's bad advice that will get you writing bad code.

    Familiarize yourself with the languages you are going to learn in your class, and read the book. My intro to computer science class went from 15 to 5 with only 2 passing because people expected the professor to teach us the language. They will give you bits and pieces, but the only way to really learn the language is to read the textbook, learn the different syntax and semantic nuances of the language, look at the examples, and do the assignments. Again, do not learn something stupid like ActionScript or JavaScript or something. They will teach you stuff like if/else statements and loops and variables and whatnot, but generally they are loosely typed languages (compared to C++ and Java, at least) and what will confuse you later on and cause you to write really bad code. Worse than you will already be writing since you're a novice (all novices write bad code. It's just a fact of life).

    Again, read the textbook, look at the examples, and do your assignments. If you have questions, go see your professor. That's the best way to learn how to program in this situation.
     
  9. big_z

    big_z Well-Known Member

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    This is critical. Take this from someone who breezed through high school never having to ask for help on anything, only to get kicked around in college because I was "too smart" to need to ask for help. In one of my college classes we wrote a Matlab clone in C++ iteratively over the semester. While I was still in full ego mode I got B's and C's on the programs and a C on the midterm. After I swallowed my pride and started seeing the professor during office hours for help, I got an A on the final exam and an A (maybe even over 100%, I don't remember) on the final project.
     
  10. Pryomancer

    Pryomancer Well-Known Member

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    My teacher always says that the best way to learn code is to try and teach it to someone else. If you can get them to understand it then you clearly understand it yourself.
     

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