task killer for 2.2


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  1. jacko1

    jacko1 Well-Known Member This Topic's Starter

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    is there a task killer that actually works in 2.2 rooted x
     

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  2. D13

    D13 Well-Known Member

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    you don't need a task killer

    but no there are none for 2.2
     
  3. jacko1

    jacko1 Well-Known Member This Topic's Starter

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    fair enough thanks for answering
     
  4. blink

    blink Well-Known Member

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    EStrongs Task Manger does work with 2.2. However, like he said, really no need for one.
     
  5. jacko1

    jacko1 Well-Known Member This Topic's Starter

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    i tried that but does not work on browser and google maps
     
  6. Android_LIFE

    Android_LIFE Well-Known Member

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    Advanced Task Killer Froyo by Rechild


    When I tap and hold on browser., select kill., it appears to...then I open my browser., and my opened pages from before are still open.
    There is however a Force Stop option you may select when you push and hold on browser., and it does force stop/close the browser.
    By selecting force stop when you press and hold on an app in A.T.K. Froyo,
    A.T.K. Froyo shortcuts you to the application info screen.

    homezcreen/menu button, settings/ Applications/ Manage Applications/ and then tapping on desired app, also takes you to Application Info screen where you can force close or kill an application.


    Advanced Task Killer Froyo is currently in beta and available for free on the market.
     
  7. Rockee

    Rockee Member

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    Auto Task Manager works.
     
  8. absoludicrous

    absoludicrous Member

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    what is the problem with task killers on froyo? are people unable to install them? or is it not killing the tasks? i had ATK installed before the upgrade and it is still working for me.
     
  9. Android_LIFE

    Android_LIFE Well-Known Member

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    the API to end applications was removed in Android 2.2
     
  10. absoludicrous

    absoludicrous Member

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    i see. i was having an issue with trying to close an app. i though it kept opening by itself. but i guess it was just not closing properly. the weird thing is that it works for certain apps like the bloatware. not sure how that works? :confused:
     
  11. Android_LIFE

    Android_LIFE Well-Known Member

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    This is not directed at any specific person.
    "Task Killers" should be renamed to cater towards battery saving apps.
    Remember the facebook app update that just hammered the bejesus out of your battery? That's the only reason I ever use "task killers" to help improve battery life especially when Im not around a charger.
    Im not concerned about free MB's in memory, the droid x has plenty to run everything I throw at it.

    Task killers should only be used to stop apps, so that one can allow the battery to last as long as possible.
    Some apps call for gps.
    Others like twitter, can update every 5 minutes. (I know the interval can be changed)
    I think a good solution would be for app developers to implement a real quit button or a real exit button, where once you select it, the app actually closes, or force closes. And in addition to this feature, devs code their apps not to automatically relaunch unless the user enables or checkboxes the option to do so.

    Had to get that out.

    I think the devs of the task killer apps are scrambling to come out with upgrades or froyo versions of "task killers" to help save our battery life.

    I think we will see a new era of task killing and managing apps hit the market because of froyo.
     
  12. izomiac

    izomiac Active Member

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    Personally, I'm the type of person to put stuff away when I'm done with it. That carries over to Android, and it bugs me when stuff is running unnecessarily (I know it's unnecessary since I can predict my behavior better than Android). Similarly, I like to start certain applications with a clean slate, like Browser or Epocrates.

    What I did was add a shortcut to the "Manage Applications" activity in "Settings" on my homescreeen using Launcher Pro. It's not the best taskmanager, but at least it works in Froyo. I also reboot daily now.
     
  13. Piiman

    Piiman Well-Known Member

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    That's because Google removed the API to kill task! The guy that wrote Advanced Task Killer was talking about how much money he made and mentions.

    1. Killing task isn't needed in the newer versions of the OS
    2. Google removed the API to kill task in 2.2

    So not only did Google remove the ability but the creator of the most popular task killer admits it's not needed.

    I believe the story is on Android central. He is talking about how the app store is a good source of income. He made a few $$ with it and list it all in the story.

    Makes me want to get my "Pet my Kitty" app up ASAP if I could get the f'ing App inventor to work right with 2.2 drivers:mad:
     
  14. Piiman

    Piiman Well-Known Member

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    Its obvious you don't know how the system works. And yeah they're probaly working hard to take your money for making you feel good because that's all these apps do. They remind me of the memory defraggers that were all the rage 10 years ago.

    What app are you killing to save your battery?

    Unless its a service and if it isn't in the front it is suspended, if you used the home key to switch from a running app then yes that app is running if it is finishing a task and then it is suspended. If they are suspended it isn't doing anything and thus not using your battery. If you don't want your apps updating set it to not update so often. You killing it does nothing it just reloads behind your back (usually with in minutes)

    If you use the back button until you are out the app is suspended (that is your shut down/exit.) It is using nothing but memory and used memory doesn't take any more juice than unused memory.

    Just Google why Task managers are bad and you will find tons of info on how the system works and why task killer are bad.

    Just had to get that out.
     
  15. Piiman

    Piiman Well-Known Member

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    One more time THEY ARE NOT RUNNING!!:eek: and you do know that most just come back with in a few minutes (if that long)

    If you want to start with a clean slate then exit the browser the correct way. Don't use the Home key.

    I find that people that insist on using these things even when they know they do nothing and are bad are one of these...

    1. People that don't know how the system works
    2. People that think the system should work like Windows
    3. Control freaks.

    I think Google should also remove the API that lets you see preloaded apps. :eek: Or maybe they should give people the option to have their phones run slower buy never keeping anything in memory.

    I'm off to bed flame away:D
     
  16. humungus

    humungus Well-Known Member

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    Just use autostarts to stop apps from loading. It's a much better solution.
     
  17. izomiac

    izomiac Active Member

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    Ok, I just opened Browser and Epocrates. On Browser I tried both using back as many times as necessary to get out (which can be >20, but eventually it goes to the homepage, loads it, then hides), and closing the window (ditto about the homepage). Given that I can later quickly reopen my dynamic iGoogle page and see outdated infromation I'm fairly sure it's still running. Epocrates stays on whatever you left it on and won't stop running even from back on the first screen. But, don't take my word that they're still running, take a look:

    Code (Text):
    1. $ ps
    2. USER     PID   PPID  VSIZE  RSS     WCHAN    PC         NAME
    3. root      1     0     292    272   ffffffff 00000000 S /init
    4. root      2     0     0      0     ffffffff 00000000 S kthreadd
    5. root      3     2     0      0     ffffffff 00000000 S ksoftirqd/0
    6. root      4     2     0      0     ffffffff 00000000 S watchdog/0
    7. root      5     2     0      0     ffffffff 00000000 S events/0
    8. root      6     2     0      0     ffffffff 00000000 S khelper
    9. root      9     2     0      0     ffffffff 00000000 S async/mgr
    10. root      12    2     0      0     ffffffff 00000000 S suspend
    11. root      194   2     0      0     ffffffff 00000000 S sync_supers
    12. root      196   2     0      0     ffffffff 00000000 S bdi-default
    13. root      198   2     0      0     ffffffff 00000000 S kblockd/0
    14. root      202   2     0      0     ffffffff 00000000 S omap_serial
    15. root      210   2     0      0     ffffffff 00000000 S omap2_mcspi
    16. root      213   2     0      0     ffffffff 00000000 S cpcap_irq/0
    17. root      275   2     0      0     ffffffff 00000000 S ksuspend_usbd
    18. root      280   2     0      0     ffffffff 00000000 S khubd
    19. root      305   2     0      0     ffffffff 00000000 S kmmcd
    20. root      312   2     0      0     ffffffff 00000000 S bluetooth
    21. root      345   2     0      0     ffffffff 00000000 S khungtaskd
    22. root      346   2     0      0     ffffffff 00000000 S kswapd0
    23. root      348   2     0      0     ffffffff 00000000 S aio/0
    24. root      349   2     0      0     ffffffff 00000000 S crypto/0
    25. root      442   2     0      0     ffffffff 00000000 S kxtf9_wq
    26. root      446   2     0      0     ffffffff 00000000 S omap_mdm_ctrl_w
    27. root      481   2     0      0     ffffffff 00000000 S mtdblockd
    28. root      509   2     0      0     ffffffff 00000000 S klink_driver_wq
    29. root      524   2     0      0     ffffffff 00000000 S usb_mass_storag
    30. root      532   2     0      0     ffffffff 00000000 S qtouch_obp_ts_w
    31. root      541   2     0      0     ffffffff 00000000 S bu52014hfv_wq
    32. root      544   2     0      0     ffffffff 00000000 S sfh7743_wq
    33. root      574   2     0      0     ffffffff 00000000 S bridge_work-que
    34. root      575   2     0      0     ffffffff 00000000 S bridge_recovery
    35. root      581   2     0      0     ffffffff 00000000 S w1_bus_master1
    36. root      590   2     0      0     ffffffff 00000000 S kstriped
    37. root      592   2     0      0     ffffffff 00000000 S kondemand/0
    38. root      611   2     0      0     ffffffff 00000000 S als_wq
    39. root      625   2     0      0     ffffffff 00000000 S usbhid_resumer
    40. root      628   2     0      0     ffffffff 00000000 S binder
    41. root      643   2     0      0     ffffffff 00000000 S krfcommd
    42. root      645   2     0      0     ffffffff 00000000 S dsi
    43. root      682   2     0      0     ffffffff 00000000 S pvrflip/0
    44. root      687   2     0      0     ffffffff 00000000 S mmcqd
    45. root      1029  2     0      0     ffffffff 00000000 S mmcqd
    46. root      1059  2     0      0     ffffffff 00000000 S kjournald
    47. root      1067  2     0      0     ffffffff 00000000 S flush-179:32
    48. root      1070  2     0      0     ffffffff 00000000 S kjournald
    49. root      1080  2     0      0     ffffffff 00000000 S kjournald
    50. root      1092  2     0      0     ffffffff 00000000 S kjournald
    51. root      1102  2     0      0     ffffffff 00000000 S kjournald
    52. shell     1116  1     3308   184   ffffffff 00000000 S /sbin/adbd
    53. root      1118  1     1032   276   ffffffff 00000000 S /system/bin/ecckeyd
    54. system    1119  1     712    288   ffffffff 00000000 S /system/bin/servicemanager
    55. root      1120  1     3644   540   ffffffff 00000000 S /system/bin/vold
    56. root      1121  1     3636   512   ffffffff 00000000 S /system/bin/netd
    57. root      1122  1     572    252   ffffffff 00000000 S /system/bin/debuggerd
    58. radio     1123  1     10752  716   ffffffff 00000000 S /system/bin/rild
    59. root      1125  1     784    352   ffffffff 00000000 S /system/bin/usbd
    60. mot_accy  1126  1     1256   496   ffffffff 00000000 S /system/bin/battd
    61. root      1128  1     113076 19652 ffffffff 00000000 S zygote
    62. media     1129  1     36000  2164  ffffffff 00000000 S /system/bin/mediaserver
    63. bluetooth 1130  1     1172   364   ffffffff 00000000 S /system/bin/dbus-daemon
    64. root      1131  1     724    344   ffffffff 00000000 S /system/bin/installd
    65. keystore  1133  1     1524   384   ffffffff 00000000 S /system/bin/keystore
    66. mot_tcmd  1134  1     14472  952   ffffffff 00000000 S /system/bin/tcmd
    67. compass   1136  1     180    40    ffffffff 00000000 S /system/bin/akmd2
    68. radio     1142  1     936    356   ffffffff 00000000 S /system/bin/ftmipcd
    69. root      1143  1     1732   316   ffffffff 00000000 S /system/bin/mdm_panicd
    70. mot_tpapi 1145  1     1084   348   ffffffff 00000000 S /system/bin/secclkd
    71. root      1154  2     0      0     ffffffff 00000000 S smodule
    72. root      1179  1     832    272   ffffffff 00000000 S /system/bin/smoduled
    73. system    1232  1128  295872 65164 ffffffff 00000000 S system_server
    74. app_17    1300  1128  162236 22212 ffffffff 00000000 S com.motorola.blur.providers.contacts
    75. app_85    1349  1128  164964 25148 ffffffff 00000000 S com.swype.android.inputmethod
    76. radio     1356  1128  172804 21108 ffffffff 00000000 S com.android.phone
    77. app_17    1357  1128  216324 25392 ffffffff 00000000 S com.motorola.blur.service.main
    78. app_43    1361  1128  169716 26076 ffffffff 00000000 S com.motorola.blur.service.blur
    79. app_2     1362  1128  167356 17308 ffffffff 00000000 S com.motorola.blur.home
    80. app_42    1369  1128  150064 18940 ffffffff 00000000 S com.motorola.batterymanager
    81. app_27    1377  1128  152048 15656 ffffffff 00000000 S com.nuance.android.vsuite.vsuiteapp
    82. app_106   1397  1128  174660 32784 ffffffff 00000000 S android.process.acore
    83. app_7     1416  1128  183004 23524 ffffffff 00000000 S com.google.process.gapps
    84. app_28    1434  1128  155048 16816 ffffffff 00000000 S com.android.music
    85. app_16    1447  1128  159908 20740 ffffffff 00000000 S android.process.media
    86. app_20    1468  1128  152024 16728 ffffffff 00000000 S com.google.android.apps.uploader
    87. app_18    1480  1128  180752 29348 ffffffff 00000000 S com.google.android.gm
    88. app_93    1490  1128  150264 16728 ffffffff 00000000 S org.hermit.dazzle
    89. app_47    1503  1128  153416 16008 ffffffff 00000000 S com.motorola.homesync
    90. app_68    1511  1128  153696 17252 ffffffff 00000000 S android.tts
    91. app_21    1517  1128  149940 15744 ffffffff 00000000 S com.svox.pico
    92. app_52    1524  1128  149056 15616 ffffffff 00000000 S com.motorola.vclipboard
    93. app_2     1547  1128  158984 17288 ffffffff 00000000 S com.motorola.blur.contacts
    94. root      1555  2     0      0     ffffffff 00000000 S flush-179:0
    95. app_84    1556  1128  149960 15656 ffffffff 00000000 S com.motorola.globalunplug
    96. app_79    1563  1128  155268 17240 ffffffff 00000000 S com.motorola.blur.alarmclock
    97. app_76    1576  1128  154788 18416 ffffffff 00000000 S com.motorola.blur.conversations
    98. app_34    1585  1128  162436 19472 ffffffff 00000000 S com.android.calendar
    99. app_65    1596  1128  149024 15660 ffffffff 00000000 S com.motorola.android.AudioEffectSettings
    100. app_62    1611  1128  150524 16160 ffffffff 00000000 S com.motorola.android.provisioning
    101. system    1621  1128  152788 17300 ffffffff 00000000 S com.motorola.process.system
    102. system    1627  1128  152688 15616 ffffffff 00000000 S com.motorola.blur.datamanager.app
    103. app_56    1640  1128  171456 15708 ffffffff 00000000 S com.google.android.partnersetup
    104. app_45    1646  1128  149364 15592 ffffffff 00000000 S com.motorola.android.dm.service
    105. app_44    1652  1128  150764 17152 ffffffff 00000000 S com.fusionone.android.sync.service
    106. app_42    1667  1128  149312 16096 ffffffff 00000000 S com.motorola.batterymanager:deviceStats
    107. app_39    1673  1128  163376 18136 ffffffff 00000000 S com.google.android.apps.maps:FriendService
    108. app_37    1680  1128  151068 16256 ffffffff 00000000 S com.motorola.usb
    109. app_36    1686  1128  150512 16680 ffffffff 00000000 S com.motorola.vvm
    110. app_29    1699  1128  149520 16616 ffffffff 00000000 S com.android.bluetooth
    111. app_25    1710  1128  151024 16948 ffffffff 00000000 S com.motorola.android.syncml.service
    112. app_2     1721  1128  148920 16080 ffffffff 00000000 S com.motorola.android.buacontactadapter
    113. app_17    1728  1128  154604 17192 ffffffff 00000000 S com.motorola.blur.contacts.data
    114. app_15    1730  1128  149480 16068 ffffffff 00000000 S com.motorola.videoplayer
    115. app_5     1748  1128  149688 16024 ffffffff 00000000 S com.motorola.cmas
    116. app_3     1756  1128  149388 17432 ffffffff 00000000 S com.motorola.android.datamanager
    117. app_152   1762  1128  150656 16768 ffffffff 00000000 S de.anno.android.missedCall
    118. app_98    1768  1128  150960 18848 ffffffff 00000000 S com.drclabs.android.wootchecker:woot_remote
    119. app_105   1780  1128  169000 22808 ffffffff 00000000 S com.google.android.apps.googlevoice
    120. app_153   1797  1128  149408 17524 ffffffff 00000000 S kenyu73.realsignal
    121. app_137   1808  1128  159712 21372 ffffffff 00000000 S com.kugoweb.launcher.donut
    122. app_175   1820  1128  164912 27720 ffffffff 00000000 S com.google.android.apps.genie.geniewidget
    123. app_16    1831  1128  155896 17312 ffffffff 00000000 S com.motorola.photowidget
    124. app_139   1838  1128  156228 18680 ffffffff 00000000 S com.roflharrison.agenda
    125. app_154   1845  1128  157416 24536 ffffffff 00000000 S com.google.code.appsorganizer
    126. app_4     1861  1128  167384 31076 ffffffff 00000000 S com.android.vending
    127. app_99    1881  1128  155956 18036 ffffffff 00000000 S fm.last.android
    128. app_99    1891  1128  152760 18176 ffffffff 00000000 S fm.last.android:player
    129. app_99    1898  1128  151804 17756 ffffffff 00000000 S fm.last.android:scrobbler
    130. app_2     1922  1128  176544 20860 ffffffff 00000000 S com.motorola.blur.friendfeed
    131. app_2     2016  1128  152188 16004 ffffffff 00000000 S com.motorola.togglewidgets
    132. app_172   2092  1128  213284 17492 ffffffff 00000000 S com.qo.android.moto
    133. app_12    2127  1128  166716 20780 ffffffff 00000000 S android.process.acore
    134. root      2146  2     0      0     ffffffff 00000000 S sdio_wq
    135. root      2148  2     0      0     ffffffff 00000000 S tiwlan_wq
    136. wifi      2156  1     1984   964   ffffffff 00000000 S /system/bin/wpa_supplicant
    137. dhcp      2161  1     756    344   ffffffff 00000000 S /system/bin/dhcpcd
    138. app_67    2320  1128  156376 16336 ffffffff 00000000 S com.motorola.blur.socialmessaging
    139. app_2     2329  1128  152840 16168 ffffffff 00000000 S com.motorola.blur.home.newsstatus
    140. app_171   2489  1128  148944 15996 ffffffff 00000000 S com.android.defcontainer
    141. app_88    2500  1128  151520 16704 ffffffff 00000000 S com.motorola.cardock
    142. app_147   2507  1128  151340 16944 ffffffff 00000000 S de.softxperience.android.noteeverything
    143. app_100   2519  1128  156056 17796 ffffffff 00000000 S com.layar
    144. app_155   2528  1128  152800 17036 ffffffff 00000000 S com.google.android.googlequicksearchbox
    145. app_156   2578  1128  181360 33012 ffffffff 00000000 S pepid.android
    146. app_54    2600  1128  149880 18352 ffffffff 00000000 S com.android.packageinstaller
    147. app_127   2618  1128  148996 15908 ffffffff 00000000 S com.socialnmobile.buttonshortcuts
    148. app_103   2629  1128  201556 37024 ffffffff 00000000 S com.epocrates
    149. app_58    2658  1128  189308 35744 ffffffff 00000000 S com.android.browser
    150. app_102   2795  1128  163960 26248 ffffffff 00000000 S org.connectbot
    151. app_102   2810  2795  644    324   c006a098 afd0e86c S /system/bin/sh
    152. app_102   2813  2810  856    432   c01b8cb4 afd0d97c S top
    153. app_102   2818  2795  644    328   c006a098 afd0e86c S /system/bin/sh
    154. app_102   2825  2818  828    352   00000000 afd0d95c R ps
    155.  
    So... yes... they're absolutely running. In fact, so is top from a prior shell session. Kill sig 9 to the PID does seem to work from su, but Android doesn't recognize the termination (keeps it listed as "Running" but switching to it is slow, indicating that it has to be relaunched).

    So, assume the process isn't waking the CPU up and bringing it out of idle (an unlikely assumption, but I'll give it to you*). What must Android do when an application asks for more memory? Well, your disk cache is the first thing to go. What's a disk cache? It keeps files that you've recently accessed around in memory so if you access them again it'll be much faster and you can avoid using the SD card or NAND (Net result: faster and less battery consumption).

    Once that's gone what's next? Well, your longest neglected activity that's currently running is next. So Android executes finish() on the activity, then it terminates. For a large application this could take a second or so. Killing an app when you have a moment ensures you don't need to do this when another application is doing something time sensitive. What do you think happens when a program asks malloc for 1 KB of memory for a quick array, but it takes 1000 ms rather than 1 ms? Your guess is as good as mine. Programmers shouldn't make assumptions that aren't always true, but few programmers have that level of attention to detail, especially in a high level language like Java... This is confounded since Java code isn't run on the bare metal, so you have little idea of when the VM is going to allocate memory.

    So, what if you need ever more memory? Well, the next to go might be an application you're actively using. For simplicity's sake, say you have three applications: A, B, & C. A & B use 40% of the available memory, while C uses 25%. Say your usage pattern is A, B, C, A, B. Your used memory after A & B is 80%, so A gets killed to make room for C. After opening C you are at 65%, so B is killed to open A, and, lastly, C is killed to open B. This is an example of where Android's predicting scheme doesn't work well at all, and being able to manually kill C keeps you from unnecessary opening and closing in the background. BTW, just picture how this works if C is Gmail and A & B are programs you're reading information from to type an e-mail (hint: scrolling position is usually lost, documents are rarely reopened, and sometimes unsaved documents are lost).

    * Linux power management is a fun topic, but off topic for now. I'm referring to race to idle in conjunction with tickless idle. Intel has a site that introduces the topic better than I can. Here is a presentation on what Android inherits from Linux regarding power management, and how OMAP SOCs differ from Intel CPUs. If you want it from the horse's mouth, though, the Android Developer's Guide touches upon why it's bad to load, kill, load, kill stuff. Honestly, though, it's a programming reference and not a description of how Android's memory management works behind the scenes, and rather basic overall (excellent for its purpose, which is to remind experienced programmers and educate new ones).


    So, which am I? :p 1) is true, I'm still an incomplete noob when it comes to Android, Linux, Kernels, Memory Management, C++, Java, Embedded Systems, and most everything else I touched upon; inaccuracies are doubtlessly afoot (I learn through being told specifically how I'm being idiotic, so I'll be glad if someone points them out). 2) is false, I think it should run more like Linux, but I don't think Linux's memory management or other components are particularly good, just the best whole package that's readily available. 3) Guilty as charged. Isn't that the premise of being a tweaker? Small performance gains through knowledge and effort by switching from a generic automated method to a more tailored or manually controlled approach...

    I hope I didn't disappoint!
     
  18. D13

    D13 Well-Known Member

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    you gotta post more:D
     
  19. pm1066

    pm1066 Well-Known Member

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    I am really struggling with how this is more than a hypothetical. What three (or 5 or 7) applications could be run simultaneously that would use that much memory?

    Can you provide a practical example where something like this occurs on even first gen android phones, let alone the HW packages we are seeing now?
     
  20. JrzDroid

    JrzDroid Well-Known Member

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    I'm gonna pull a ofthedamned and tell ya that you don't need task killers.
    If you don't know who that is go check out the eris forums.
    Swype is so much fun
     
  21. Piiman

    Piiman Well-Known Member

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    Damn my eyes are burning and my brain hurts.:D


    But I still think your a little confused.. But to clarify my point yes some things are running of course, its an OS and some stuff needs to run. People kill this stuff all the time with Task killers and that causes problems and most people only see the task from at task manager and think its all running when in fact most of it isn't.

    I hate typing so here's some reading for you and anyone that cares.
    Why you don’t need a task killer app with Android. AndroidSPIN | Your No.1 source for Everything Android.

    Application Fundamentals | Android Developers

    I was going to post more links but I want my post to be BIGGER than yours:D


    • Android is hard coded to automatically kill a task when more memory is needed.
    • Android is hard coded to automatically kill a task when it’s done doing what it needs to do.
    • Android is hard coded to automatically kill a task when you haven’t returned to it in a long time.
    • Most services (while possibly running in the background) use very little memory when not actively doing something.
    • A content provider is only doing something when there is a notification for it to give. Otherwise it uses very little memory.
    • Killing a process when it isn’t ready only causes it to have to reload itself and start from scratch when it’s needed again.
    • Because a task is likely running in the background for a reason, killing it will only cause it to re-spawn as soon as the activity that was using it looks for it again. And it will just have to start over again.
    • Killing certain processes can have undesirable side effects. Not receiving text messages, alarms not going off, and force closes just to name a few.
    • The only true way to prevent something from running at all on your phone would be to uninstall the .apk.
    • Most applications will exit themselves if you get out of it by hitting “back” until it closes rather than hitting the “home” button. But even with hitting home, Android will eventually kill it once it’s been in the background for a while.
    Questions? Concerns? Feel that I’m wrong? Comment below and let’s discuss!
    Addendum:

    One thing that I forgot to even address here is that memory works a bit differently in linux than it does in Windows. In general the way memory works is you really only need as much as you plan on using. So if your combined running programs use 100mb of memory, 150mb is more than enough. There is no need to clear what’s running in memory before you hit that 150mb cap. Now in Windows it seems that the system performs a bit better when you have less stuff in memory, even if it’s not full. No doubt those who have been on [COLOR=#0000FF ! important][FONT=&quot][COLOR=#0000FF ! important][FONT=&quot]computers[/FONT][/FONT][/COLOR][/COLOR] for a while will remember there used to be programs that could clear your memory in Windows also.
    Linux however isn’t generally affected by this. While I admit that I don’t know the architecture and reason for this… linux will run the same regardless of if you have 20mb free memory or 200mb. And as I outlined above, Android will automatically start to kill applications if you do get low on memory! Stealing a quote from Chris Johnston, “Buffers and cache in RAM being cleared is silly. Imagine a professor, who rather than writing all the way across the chalkboard, finishes a sentence and immediately erases and starts writing in the upper left corner AGAIN and AGAIN and AGAIN OR imagine you like a song. You record it to the beginning of a cassette tape. When you want a new song, do you re-record over the first song or record after it?”
    I have also seen people incorrectly assume that the more memory in use, the faster their battery will die. This would actually be more attributed to the amount of processor cycles (CPU %) going on and not the amount of memory being taken up by a certain program. However, that does lead to a good point! When can a task manager be a good thing?? To help you determine what IS slowing down your phone; what may actually be draining your battery faster. That is actually what helped us discover that there appears to be a bug still left over from 1.5 that is causing slow downs on our CDMA Hero’s even today. While an item using up memory isn’t going to hurt things, an item chewing through your CPU absolutely will. Now I still don’t suggest using a task killer to kill a program that is using up your processor (unless of course it is a zombie process that is going crazy, but you should probably just reboot in that case). But it can help you see what’s going on with your phone.
    I hope this has helped someone. With all of that said… I always encourage experimenting. It is your phone, and you can do with it what you please. If you swear that a task killer makes your phone amazing, then by all means use it! [​IMG] Thanks for reading.





    FAQ: Why You Shouldn’t Be Using a Task Killer with Android

    I see this come up over and over again. People saying that a task is running in the background and they think it is killing their battery or hogging all of their memory. So their natural reaction is to download a program made to kill tasks. Here’s the thing… you are likely doing more harm than good by killing tasks that aren’t ready to end. I was the same way when I first got my CDMA Hero. There were tons of things running that I didn’t want so I just kept killing them. After a few weeks I realized that if I stopped using a task killer (and totally uninstalled it in fact) my phone actually began to run better! The applications would close themselves and things just seemed to be running better. I get that there may be short term benefits from clearing a task, but you should still take the time to read through this.

    Here is some information directly from Android’s developer page. I have put the important parts in bold. This is quite a lengthy read but honestly I think it’s important. If you want the full read then you can check out the dev page here. If you just want the quick TL;DNR version then scroll to the bottom.
    By default, every application runs in its own Linux process. Android starts the process when any of the application’s code needs to be executed, and shuts down the process when it’s no longer needed and system resources are required by other applications.
    A content provider is active only while it’s responding to a request from a ContentResolver. And a broadcast receiver is active only while it’s responding to a broadcast message. So there’s no need to explicitly shut down these components.
    Activities, on the other hand, provide the user interface. They’re in a long-running conversation with the user and may remain active, even when idle, as long as the conversation continues. Similarly, services may also remain running for a long time. So Android has methods to shut down activities and services in an orderly way:

    • An activity can be shut down by calling its finish() method. One activity can shut down another activity (one it started with startActivityForResult()) by calling finishActivity().
    • A service can be stopped by calling its stopSelf() method, or by calling Context.stopService().
    Components might also be shut down by the system when they are no longer being used or when Android must reclaim memory for more active components.
    If the user leaves a task for a long time, the system clears the task of all activities except the root activity. When the user returns to the task again, it’s as the user left it, except that only the initial activity is present. The idea is that, after a time, users will likely have abandoned what they were doing before and are returning to the task to begin something new.
    Activity lifecycle

    An activity has essentially three states:

    • It is active or running when it is in the foreground of the screen (at the top of the activity stack for the current task). This is the activity that is the focus for the user’s actions.
    • It is paused if it has lost focus but is still visible to the user. That is, another activity lies on top of it and that activity either is transparent or doesn’t cover the full screen, so some of the paused activity can show through. A paused activity is completely alive (it maintains all state and member information and remains attached to the window manager), but can be killed by the system in extreme low memory situations.
    • It is stopped if it is completely obscured by another activity. It still retains all state and member information. However, it is no longer visible to the user so its window is hidden and it will often be killed by the system when memory is needed elsewhere.
    If an activity is paused or stopped, the system can drop it from memory either by asking it to finish (calling its finish() method), or simply killing its process. When it is displayed again to the user, it must be completely restarted and restored to its previous state.
    The foreground lifetime of an activity happens between a call to onResume() until a corresponding call to onPause(). During this time, the activity is in front of all other activities on screen and is interacting with the user. An activity can frequently transition between the resumed and paused states — for example, onPause() is called when the device goes to sleep or when a new activity is started, onResume() is called when an activity result or a new intent is delivered. Therefore, the code in these two methods should be fairly lightweight.
    The following diagram illustrates these loops and the paths an activity may take between states. The colored ovals are major states the activity can be in. The square rectangles represent the callback methods you can implement to perform operations when the activity transitions between states.
    [​IMG]


    This is only a fraction of articles that tell you they are bad, see how many you find that say they are good.

    and No I didn't write this , obviously (I wish I could write that well) but I think its bigger than yours :D

    And yes I agree you're a 3;)
     
  22. Piiman

    Piiman Well-Known Member

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    I'd say no he can't because it is inaccurate, his description of the life cycle and what gets killed when is wrong.
     
  23. D13

    D13 Well-Known Member

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    yep
     
  24. Piiman

    Piiman Well-Known Member

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    could you keep your post a little shorter please.
     
  25. D13

    D13 Well-Known Member

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    no
     

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