The Aviation Thread

Discussion in 'The Lounge' started by rootabaga, Jan 10, 2017.

  1. rootabaga

    rootabaga Well-Known Member
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    I'm not a pilot, but I follow general aviation and am a bit of a nerd about it.

    For like-minded souls, if there are any, I thought it might be fun to have a place to share stories, videos, etc.

    I'll start with this one about a B-52 in a crosswind landing. Crosswind landings can be pretty hairy (for those who are unfamiliar with the term, a crosswind landing happens any time there is a wind blowing in a direction other than parallel with the runway, so they are pretty common) and this one is just cool because of the landing gear design of the B-52.

    Enjoy...
    http://worldwarwings.com/b-52-makes-high-crosswind-landing-but-not-like-youd-expect/
     

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  2. lvt

    lvt Well-Known Member
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    Any other aircraft has the same main landing gears design ?
     
  3. Dngrsone

    Dngrsone Well-Known Member
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    If there is, then I think it would be the larger cargo planes such as the C-5 Galaxy.
     
  4. rootabaga

    rootabaga Well-Known Member
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    Here's a compilation from Birmingham Airport in the UK that is really quite good of some crosswind landings, including some missed approaches and a crosswind takeoff that is really breathtaking.

     
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  5. rootabaga

    rootabaga Well-Known Member
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    And some of the more challenging airports in the world...

     
  6. rootabaga

    rootabaga Well-Known Member
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    And the last one for today, the twenty largest aircraft ever. The last one, the Hercules (never really used), had a wingspan of 321 feet.

    That means you'd have to remove the goalposts from a football field in order to park it sideways...

     
  7. lvt

    lvt Well-Known Member
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    So you are on a commercial flight, both pilots are suddenly incapacitated mid-flight and nobody is willing to act.

    What would you do?
     
  8. rootabaga

    rootabaga Well-Known Member
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    ^^^There's always the old saying, "If you're faced with a forced landing, fly the thing as far into the crash as possible."
     
  9. Dngrsone

    Dngrsone Well-Known Member
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    Depending on the aircraft and the carrier, the plane may be capable of landing itself.

    Realistically, there's no way you are going to get into that cockpit if both pilots are out of commission: the post-9/11 security precautions isolate the cockpit from the cabin with a locked security door.
     
  10. lvt

    lvt Well-Known Member
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    So you get more time on a long haul flight than a regional flight
     
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  11. lvt

    lvt Well-Known Member
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    Auto-landing is still experimental AFAIK.

    I've read that with most of airline companies, there are at least three people who can open the cockpit door, the pilots and crew chief.
     
  12. rootabaga

    rootabaga Well-Known Member
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    In the wake of the Germanwings tragedy, the airline manufacturers supposedly have (silently) established a way for crews to get into a cockpit that is locked from the inside.

    As to what to do once you're in there, so long as you are on one of the more modern airliners with all systems working properly and with sufficient fuel to get to a properly-equipped airport in good weather, ATC can talk one of the flight attendants through engaging the autopilot to configure for landing. Manual intervention is still required, but it's done in conjunction with the autopilot and is not nearly so difficult as actually landing the plane. I think the "autoland" feature first saw daylight with the 777, so it's relatively old technology at this point.
     
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  13. rootabaga

    rootabaga Well-Known Member
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  14. Slug

    Slug Check six!
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    Here's an Airbus A350 practicing crosswind landings at Stornoway Airport on the Isle of Lewis back in early November.

     
  15. LV426

    LV426 Well-Known Member
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    I guess crosswind landing/takeoffs are where a pilot really earns his/her money. Some scary footage there :eek:
     
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  16. rootabaga

    rootabaga Well-Known Member
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    Yes, indeed. There's an old adage that being a commercial pilot is "three hours of boredom followed by 90 seconds of sheer terror." :D
     
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  17. lvt

    lvt Well-Known Member
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    It reminds me about the Aisiana Flight 214, after spending half day in the air during an uneventful transocean flight, the aircraft's tail struck the airport barrier and crashed right on the runway.
     
  18. mrex

    mrex Well-Known Member
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    Oh god! I think im going to cancel my trip to Prague... going there in few weeks. (Or not!)
     
  19. The_Chief

    The_Chief Accept no imitations!
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    How to Fly a Helicopter, by Dave Barry

    :)

    TODAY'S AVIATION TOPIC IS: How to fly a helicopter.

    Although flying a helicopter may seem very difficult, the truth is that if you can drive a car, you can, with just a few minutes of instruction, take the controls of one of these amazing machines. Of course you would immediately crash and die. This is why you need to remember:

    RULE ONE OF HELICOPTER PILOTING: Always have somebody sitting right next to you who actually knows how to fly the helicopter and can snatch the controls away from you. Because the truth is that helicopters are nothing at all like cars. Cars work because of basic scientific principles that everybody understands, such as internal combustion and parallel parking. Whereas scientists still have no idea what holds helicopters up. "Whatever it is, it could stop at any moment," is their current feeling. This leads us to:

    RULE TWO OF HELICOPTER PILOTING: Maybe you should forget the entire thing.

    This was what I was thinking on a recent Saturday morning as I stood outside a small airport in South Florida, where I was about to take my first helicopter lesson. This was not my idea. This was the idea of Pam Gallina-Raissiguier, a pilot who flies radio reporters over Miami during rush hour so they can alert drivers to traffic problems ("Bob, we have a three-mile backup on the interstate due to an overturned cocaine truck").

    Pam is active in an international organization of women helicopter pilots called - Gloria Steinem, avert your eyes - the "Whirly Girls." She thought it would be a great idea for me to take a helicopter lesson.

    I began having severe doubts when I saw Pam's helicopter. This was a small helicopter. It looked like it should have a little slot where you insert quarters to make it go up and down. I knew that if we got airborne in a helicopter this size in South Florida, some of our larger tropical flying insects could very well attempt to mate with us.

    Also, this helicopter had no doors. As a Frequent Flyer, I know for a fact that all your leading U.S. airlines, despite being bankrupt, maintain a strict safety policy of having doors on their aircraft.

    "Don't we need a larger helicopter?" I asked Pam. "With doors?"

    "Get in," said Pam.

    You don't defy a direct order from a Whirly Girl.

    Now we're in the helicopter, and Pam is explaining the controls to me over the headset, but there's static and the engine is making a lot of noise.

    ". . . your throttle (something)," she is saying. "this is your cyclic and (something) your collective."

    "What?" I say.

    "(something) give you the controls when we reach 500 feet," Pam says.

    "WHAT?" I say.

    But Pam is not listening. She is moving a control thing and WHOOAAA we are off the ground, hovering, and now WHOOOOAAAAAA we are shooting up in the air, and there are still no doors on this particular helicopter.

    Now Pam is giving me the main control thing.

    RULE THREE OF HELICOPTER PILOTING: If anybody tries to give you the main control thing, refuse to take it.

    Pam says: "You don't need hardly any pressure to . . ."

    AIEEEEEEEEEEEEEE

    "That was too much pressure," Pam says.

    Now I am flying the helicopter. I AM FLYING THE HELICOPTER. I am flying it by not moving a single body part, for fear of jiggling the control thing. I look like the Lincoln Memorial statue of Abraham Lincoln, only more rigid.

    "Make a right turn," Pam is saying.

    I gingerly move the control thing one zillionth of an inch to the right and the helicopter LEANS OVER TOWARD MY SIDE AND THERE IS STILL NO DOOR HERE. I instantly move the thing one zillionth of an inch back.

    "I'm not turning right," I inform Pam.

    "What?" she says.

    "Only left turns," I tell her. When you've been flying helicopters as long as I have, you know your limits.

    After a while, it becomes clear to Pam that if she continues to allow the Lincoln statue to pilot the helicopter, we are going to wind up flying in a straight line until we run out of fuel, possibly over Antarctica so she takes the control thing back. That is the good news. The bad news is, she's now saying something about demonstrating an "emergency procedure."

    "It's for when your engine dies," Pam says. "It's called "auto-rotation.' Do you like amusement park rides?"

    I say: "No, I DOOOOOOOOOOOOO . . ."

    RULE FOUR OF HELICOPTER PILOTING: "Auto-rotation" means "coming down out of the sky at about the same speed and aerodynamic stability as that of a forklift dropped from a bomber."

    Now we're close to the ground (although my stomach is still at 500 feet), and Pam is completing my training by having me hover the helicopter.

    RULE FIVE OF HELICOPTER PILOTING: You can't hover the helicopter.

    The idea is to hang over one spot on the ground. I am hovering over an area approximately the size of Australia. I am swooping around sideways and backward like a crazed bumblebee. If I were trying to rescue a person from the roof of a 100-story burning building, the person would realize that it would be safer to simply jump. At times I think I am hovering upside-down. Even Pam looks nervous.

    So I am very happy when we finally get back on the ground.

    Pam tells me I did great, and she'd be glad to take me up again. I tell her that sounds like a fun idea.

    RULE SIX OF HELICOPTER PILOTING: Sometimes you have to lie.

    -Dave Barry
     
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  20. rootabaga

    rootabaga Well-Known Member
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    I have always loved Dave Barry...
     
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  21. rootabaga

    rootabaga Well-Known Member
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    "Mayday - Air Crash Investigations" is a well-done documentary-type series that re-enacts many airplane accidents. There is additional information provided as well, sometimes about what has been done to correct a mechanical failure. Each episode is about 52 minutes.

    I think all of the episodes are on YT, here's a list with them and it will also open to the first episode, which is about a design flaw in the cargo door of the venerable Boeing 747, which led to an explosive decompression in flight.

    You'll have to add the www. to the link below, when I did it all it would show was the embedded single episode. But if you copy and paste with the 222. in front, then you'll have the playlist as well. ;)
    youtube.com/watch?v=sBFt4d5ZcUU&list=PLIQysra_ezMZh3cNGeBAnxKNrtsAuzMwW
     
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  22. rootabaga

    rootabaga Well-Known Member
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    The reference to MAYDAY! drew me to look at an early couple of episodes. This one, "Flying on Empty," caught my attention in part because I couldn't recall the incident. It's an amazing story of fuel starvation on a modern jet (Airbus A330), and the last part of the episode shows the importance of following the required maintenance procedures.

    Both engines shut off over the Atlantic, which cut power to the plane on an overnight flight. So picture yourself as a passenger, plane goes completely dark...and silent. What would be your reaction? And then when the flight attendants came through to tell you to put on your flotation device and brace for impact? Whew.

     

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