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  1. soulfetcher13

    soulfetcher13 Well-Known Member This Topic's Starter

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  2. megaera

    megaera Well-Known Member

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    Hmmmmm...troubling. Google always weirds me out on some visceral level because of the potential for the company to control information. I can see a case for Google creating the infrastructure for its own products, given the way a faster internet (mobile or static) increases the value of the cloud as well as ensuring "room to grow" for their future endeavors. However, I just can't bring myself to support it. Closed systems creep me out, no matter how slick and efficient the resulting product is.

    It's not exactly news that Google's wanted the mobile section of the spectrum. They've actually been angling for it since at least 2007. The oldest article I could find about this: Google: You ain't seen nothin' yet. (Bonus: the article came out the day after the iPhone launched.) For all Google's talk of "open-source," they're pretty aggressive on the patent front. "Don't be evil" is their motto, but, "If you have something that you don't want anyone to know, maybe you shouldn't be doing it in the first place," was what the Google CEO said about questions raised regarding Google's privacy policies, which is almost exactly the same thing the FBI said to an oversight committee about the accidental wiretapping of random people. I will now restrain myself before I start frothing at the mouth about the "immortal cookie." It's hard to avoid using and, heck, sometimes loving Google, but I try to keep in mind the constant mining of my metadata that goes on every time I use a google service.

    I think in this case (shocking as I personally find it) Big Red is the plucky underdog in this case. What this means for those of us on Verizon using android phones, I can only make the fuzziest of hypotheses. Well, here goes: "Burned by the sluggish sales of the Nexus One and a lack of a marketing or customer service infrastructure, Google ceases to make overt gestures towards the mobile spectrum. Google's reach out to AT&T along with its current ties to T-Mobile and Verizon Wireless reassures the wireless companies that Google intends to play nice as a software/firmware provider, with the occasional foray into phone hardware. Meanwhile, with little to no fanfare, Google uses the Clearwire WiMax deal to push through its claim to the mobile real estate in mid 2011-early 2012." There you have it: a prediction which will make me look like either a genius or an idiot as time passes.




    Nolite spurii permittere terere. (just for you, Soulfetcher13)
     
  3. soulfetcher13

    soulfetcher13 Well-Known Member This Topic's Starter

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    Nolite spurii permittere terere. (just for you, Soulfetcher13)[/QUOTE]

    Very clever. Nobody ever gets that, or realizes there is a difference.
     
  4. kennyidaho

    kennyidaho Well-Known Member

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    Sounds like a load of crap to me. Exactly how does purchasing a company specializing in mobile advertisements indicate that the companies next step is to build out it's own network.
     
  5. megaera

    megaera Well-Known Member

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    I don't think it's solely the acquisition of AdMob; I'm pretty sure that this is just a sticking point Verizon is using to test Google. I think the wireless carriers are worried because they see Google building its own broadband network and investing in Sprint/Clearwire's WiMax, and they are pretty sure that the handwriting on the wall is Google Cometh.
     
  6. kennyidaho

    kennyidaho Well-Known Member

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    Yes but Google invested into Clear a long time ago and has already said they are not willing to invest any more money into Clear even when other partners dumped another billion into it.

    Google says won't give Clearwire more financing | Reuters

    In my opinion Verizon probably just wants a piece of the mobile marketing pie. Considering they have a very large user base and they see Google making a lot of add revenue off of that user base. They don't to be turned into the "dumb pipe" like traditional ISP's have.
     
  7. megaera

    megaera Well-Known Member

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    Cogent points, all. I'm definitely not trying to say that Verizon has sterling motives. It's probably more of a both/and rather than either/or with Verizon's reasons.

    This is a little digressive, but if you can't digress in the forums, then, where I ask: I just kind of wish that someone could walk behind the Google Board, only instead of whispering, "Memento mori," they'd whisper, "Power tends to corrupt, and absolute power corrupts absolutely."
     

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