Weird scanline on camera picture


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  1. apanbest

    apanbest Member This Topic's Starter

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    got this 'scanline' like effect on every picture i snap. anybody know what can cause this?

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  2. Jammy

    Jammy Well-Known Member

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    Try taking a picture with the battery cover off...
     
  3. Phenomenological

    Phenomenological Well-Known Member

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    You're indoors taking a picture in very low light. It's image noise caused by the camera increasing the ISO (Amplification of the electrical signals from the sensor) to compensate for the awful lighting. Try taking a picture outside in the daylight. They should go away. If not, it may be to do with the lens cover (Do what the poster above said to check this), or it could be a sensor issue. But the latter is unlikely.
     
  4. arkazain

    arkazain Well-Known Member

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    Yes, what the above poster said, try snapping a picture in a well-lit place.
     
  5. apanbest

    apanbest Member This Topic's Starter

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    thanks for the suggestion guys, will try to snap a picture outside tomorrow and see what happens.
     
  6. Rastaman-FB

    Rastaman-FB Well-Known Member

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    also it looks like iso 800?
    its a quick shutter so you get more grainy effect as its not having time to process all the colours
     
  7. No_u

    No_u Well-Known Member

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    Or use your built in flash :D
     
  8. Phenomenological

    Phenomenological Well-Known Member

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    Don't get me started on the disadvantages of a flash that is effectively a point light source. :p Anyway, I'm kinda bored, so I'm going to give a quick crash course in camera sensors for anyone who really cares!

    There are three ways of controlling the brightness of the images your camera takes. Shutter speed, which is how long the sensor is activated for in this case (As there is no real shutter in a phone), aperture, which is how wide the opening in the lens is, and ISO. Aperture is fixed on phone cameras as far as I know, or is at least very limited, so you can't control that. So the phone is left with the ability to increase the shutter speed (Which allows more light to hit the sensor, but causes blur if the camera or subject moves), or increase the ISO. Given the choice, it does the latter, so the photo doesn't become blurry and unusable.

    The grain you see in the image comes about due to the higher ISO. Effectively, the sensor operates exactly the same way every time you take a picture. You cannot physically change the sensor. But integrated into the sensor are a series of amplifiers, that take the signals from the individual sensor elements and increase their power. This allows the camera to 'see' a brighter image than the sensor actually generates, in much the same way as a megaphone amplifies your voice.

    However, in all images captured by a camera there is an artefact called noise. This is caused by the electronics inside the sensor and camera (The constantly changing currents generate magnetic fields that induce currents in nearby components). It's similar to (But not the same as) the phenomenon that gives you white noise on your TV if it isn't tuned, or static on your radio - Random signals being picked up. And these random signals are amplified along with the signals from the sensor. Therefore, the higher the ISO, the more the noise is magnified, and the more grainy your image becomes.

    The only real way to get around this is to physically move the elements in the sensor further apart, which is one of the reasons why professional cameras have much larger sensors than those in phone cameras, as well as larger lenses to gather more light. Thus, in the world of photography, bigger is ALWAYS better. ;)
     

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