what comp language does android sdk use


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  1. mish147

    mish147 Well-Known Member This Topic's Starter

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    hey guys im currently in college and i have been taking many computer courses, and im ready to start a computer language, but before i do this can any one tell me which language does the android sdk use? im going to assume java although everyone keeps recommending that i start with visual basic.
     

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  2. Cryptic79

    Cryptic79 VIP Member VIP Member

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    Android uses Java.

    However, starting with VB might be good as it's much easier to understand. I took 3 VB classes, 1 Java, and 3 C++ classes. I taught myself C#.

    I could step back into Java for Android pretty easily. However, C# and VB pays the bills. Any Android programming I'll do will just be for personal use because I'm a computer geek. :p

    What do you want to do after school? Microsoft developer jobs are always abundant. I live in St. Louis and they are here. I've had calls from all over, though, so that bodes well for nationwide. I know there are several Java positions as well, but I've just always preferred Microsoft (Hell, I even have an uncle who works for Sun).

    VB syntax is more similar to English than any C-based language. I found that was easier to grasp. After that, it wasn't hard to take the methodologies I learned in VB and translate them to the other languages. In fact, I suggest taking VB, then learn or teach yourself C# to get the C-based syntax understanding, then take on Java or C/C++.

    However, if you want to be a game programmer or something, just do C/C++ right off the bat.
     
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  3. adangelo

    adangelo Member

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    Cryptic gave some great advice above.

    The only thing I would add is that a good developer should also have a scripting language or two in their toolkit that they are proficient with, like Perl or Ruby.
     
  4. Cryptic79

    Cryptic79 VIP Member VIP Member

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    VB.Net or C# with JScript and ASP.NET.

    I hate...I mean HATE...JScript, but it has been useful occasionally. Thankfully, Visual Studio includes AJAX controls that do most of the scripting/markup. ;)
     
  5. adangelo

    adangelo Member

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    Recent professional work has found me using technologies in the Java family. That includes a lot of JavaScript. My complaints are largely how it's used, more so than with the language itself. Because it is useful, it can sometimes encourage bad coding habits and in the end unmaintainable code.

    I used to be a Visual C++ guy many years ago and have always been fond of Visual Studio. Lots of people bash MS for many reasons, but I think it's hard to find much fault with their developer's tools.
     
  6. eli

    eli Member

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    JavaScript is really a great language, but gets a bum wrap because browser implementations have historically sucked pretty hard. Take a look at, for example, JQuery, which is a really fun JavaScript library that also shows how flexible the language is. (And, bonus, it actually works in all modern browsers)
     
  7. mish147

    mish147 Well-Known Member This Topic's Starter

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    thanks i really appreciate it, i want to learn java but i guess maybe vb might be the best place to start, does any one know if you can code in vb for android?
     
  8. adangelo

    adangelo Member

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    Programming for Android can only be done using Java at this time.

    With out turning this into a discussion about how beneficial taking a class on programming is, I will say that as a career developer the majority of your learning will be through hands on work and reading industry books/websites. If this is your first time coding, I'd say "Intro" classes in any language will probably be quite similar and beneficial to you however.

    One of the best ways, I feel, to teach yourself programming as a novice is to download source code for existing programs and try to understand what's going on. Make changes and see if the changes you made were what you expected. The Android SDK comes with lots of sample programs that you can tinker with and re-compile. Have fun and feel free to ask questions!
     
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  9. phuthanvinh

    phuthanvinh Member

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    for sure if you are good in Java and C, you are all set.
     
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  10. eugenevdm

    eugenevdm New Member

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    Big news today is that Google is launching an OS based on Chrome, some kind of windowing manager that's going to be sitting on top of Linux.

    I then I stumbled upon this very useful post researching Google Apps programming, including Android.

    Since Android was released some new programming languages are supported:
    Android goes beyond Java, gains native C/C++ dev kit - Ars Technica

    notebly C and C++.

    Also for basic scripting it now supports Python and Lua.

    As for Google Apps, this supports Java and Python:
    Google App Engine General Questions - Google App Engine - Google Code

    I'm torn between Java and Python. I see Ubuntu is doing quite a bit of good work in I really need to choose a single language that I can become an expert in. Their free Ubuntu One client is written in Python:
    Ubuntu One Blog of Julian Andres Klode

    So for now I think I'll go with Python.
     
  11. Scott

    Scott Active Member

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    My personal vote, after about three million years in the industry: stick to Structured languages while time is limited. Learn everything else if and when you must.

    This means:

    C/C++: highest paying jobs
    C#: most ubiquitous jobs
    Java: most portable code (and includes Android)
    JavaScript: 99% solution for web-based scripting

    The language structure is so similar, all four languages can be learned (without deep Library knowledge) fairly quickly and easily, leaving you able to work with drivers, games, business apps, web pages, mobile apps and just about anything else.

    When and if you find the need to know VB.Net, you can tout your overall programming experience and "extensive knowledge of the .NET framework from using C#," and still be a strong candidate for any job.

    Cheers!
    Scott
     
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  12. Radzell

    Radzell Member

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    I am a programmer and a freshman in college and my first language was c/c++ then a little know language called byond which help with lots of concept. Then i learn python, java, c#, and a bunch of other language. I think my best advice is to either learn a low level language, and/or find a dev team. development teams have been the best way i learn because there is always someone over you and under you and you learn from teaching and people way better that you. I am starting a android dev team for a app i'm making email me basketballdeon@gmail.com if your interest or start your own on a open source site. Basically you should find a project you want and dive right into it and learn things along the way.
     
  13. cuezed

    cuezed Member

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    is it possible to develop android apps by just using the visual basic code?
     
  14. maxpfc

    maxpfc New Member

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    Hi Guys, It's all well and good learning about VB first then moving to java etc. I started writing in Assembler(INTEL) then C/C++ then MFC then java/C# etc. It really helped me understand whats really happening under the hood when I'm doing something. Esp on devices where memory is at a premium and languages that do their own(not so effective) memory management are in vogue. If I didn't know what was happening under the hood then things like converting ASCII to base64 encoding would not make sense to me. Understanding the way win32 handles the message loop and messages in general as well. If you're planning on doing any Graphics programming even in C# GDI+/Managed Direct X then knowing the underlying windows calls are essential. Or try calling a dll written in delphi using reflection from a C# program you'll get garbage out because you didn't learn that parameters are loaded onto the stack in different orders in different languages(or in the same language if specified. If you are familiar with win32 coding in C or C++ or assembler you'll know the class types for controls and the "properties" they support so you'll know what to look for in a higher level language. You'll understand how each window has a class type that is kept in an array of all the instances of that class type. So you would know that you can get a pointer to any window from it's position
    HWND WindowFromPoint(xy)

    or from it's CLASS name/title:

    HWND WINAPI FindWindow(
    _In_opt_ LPCTSTR lpClassName,
    _In_opt_ LPCTSTR lpWindowName );

    And you think ah, that would be so much simpler in C#, WRONG;
    Sample Code(C#)

    [DllImport("user32.dll")]
    public static extern IntPtr FindWindow(String sClassName, String sAppName);

    Example:


    IntPtr hwnd=FindWindow(null,"Form1");


    You're still forced to use win#@ code to get anything really fun done. Thats why I suggest learning it first, then you'll know what other programming languages MUST support. BTW going back to C is a little radical. C++ is the way(almost every coders favorite lang, operating systems (linux,Windows) were written in C++. C++ will also teach you about things like templates only recently introduced into c# as system.collections.generics, operator overloading, function pointers (delegates in C#) and so much else. If there was a functionality chart C++ would score on EVERYTHING while other languages even C# which I love would fall short. Forcing you to delete memory you allocate also makes you more conscious of how much memory you keep on the heap. For F*cks sake most "new" coders don't even know the difference between the stack and the heap. Thats why C++ coders get paid more, we know more. Basically what I'm saying is learn C++ and you'll be able to learn any other language in a week. That's a promise. And if you cannot learn it, you shouldn't be coding anyway. You should be writing queries for excel reports maybe or whatever. Plus the ENTIRE world of coders laugh at VB coders. If you go with VB at least go with VB.net that way you'll learn some of the framework (no not all of the framework is available to vb.net, it is to c#) PROVE ME WRONG.

     
  15. malcommenk

    malcommenk New Member

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    First you should have a strong background in C# language , there are so many options in front of you . Loo at the following :

    With Mono for Android, you can harness the full power of C# and .NET. Write shorter, simpler, and more maintainable code using features like LINQ, anonymous types, lambdas and more.

    MonoDroid is a software product developed by Novell to build Android based mobile applications using C# csharp.net-informations.com and .NET. To install and work with MonoDroid, you need Visual Studio 2010. MonoDroid works as an add-on of Visual Studio 2010. Once installed successfully, the MonoDroid project templates are available in Visual Studio 2010. MonoDroid does not work with Visual Studio Express.

    malcom.
     
  16. jetx2x

    jetx2x Well-Known Member Developer

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    The beginning of this thread is waaayyyy old... lol... but I've found everyone's input to be extremely helpful... I myself learned Java through my interest with android... Im only 17 and not in college yet but once I do attend college... should I take the plunge and go for c++?
     
  17. StevenHu

    StevenHu Well-Known Member

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    If you want a career in programming, then absolutely!
     

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