Which root method is right for me?


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  1. hortstu

    hortstu Well-Known Member This Topic's Starter

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    I'm using an htc evo. I'm terribly confused by the 3 different root methods and what to do after wards. Are there more than 3 methods? I've seen toast, unrevoked, and simple. I'm running 2.1 since tethering to an ubuntu box is important to me and I'm afraid the update will interfere with it.

    Is there a breakdown somewhere of the different methods somewhere with a pro's and con's list of each?

    Thanks.
     

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  2. literacolax

    literacolax Well-Known Member

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    if youve got an HTC then unrEVOked is the way to go, all you have to do is download the software, plug your phone in and push one button, doesnt get any easier my friend.
     
  3. literacolax

    literacolax Well-Known Member

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    also, if you want to upgrade to 2.2 you can use unrevoked forever and that will enable you to update while rooted.
     
  4. davidclevy

    davidclevy Member

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    If I've already rooted under 2.1, can I use unrevoked forever and then update to 2.2, or would that essentially be rooting all over again?
     
  5. wake69

    wake69 Well-Known Member

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    if you are already rooted, all you need to do is do a nandroid backup and then wipe and flash a 2.2 htc based rom and see if you are still working, if yes, you are good to go, if no, then restore your nand back up and you will have all of your settings
     
  6. exBBuser

    exBBuser Well-Known Member

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    If you still running 2.1 then Simple Root is the way to go. Just 3 simple clicks and your done.
     
  7. exBBuser

    exBBuser Well-Known Member

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    If your phone is rooted already assuming that you have nand unlock all you need to do is flash a Froyo based ROM.
     
  8. hortstu

    hortstu Well-Known Member This Topic's Starter

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    OK so I am running 2.1 What is the difference between simple root and unrevoked? I appreciate the help but now I've got conflicting ideas here and no information to base the decision on. Why is one better than the other? Are they both complete roots?

    After the root will I just have a blank slate? Where do I find the ROMs and kernels etc to get this thing going again? Or do I have a phone that appears to be the same as it was before root except now I have superuser privileges?
     
  9. davidclevy

    davidclevy Member

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    Thanks guys. Further question, please - what is a nandroid backup and what is nand unlock. I searched the Market and ROM Manager came up, so I am backing up the current ROM (I hope - I have a screen with a phone and a red triangle with an exclamation mark in it for the past few minutes). Am I headed in the right direction? thanks.
     
  10. exBBuser

    exBBuser Well-Known Member

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    Nand backup like the name states is a backup of your current setup,this backs up ROM,apps and settings. The way this works is if u flash a ROM or Kernel and they didn't work for you or you didn't like them that nand backup will put right were u was before flashing them.

    NAND is like the phone security system,without nand unlock u wouldn't be able to have full control over what you do with your phone. This include flashing ROMs, kernels........
     
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  11. novox77

    novox77 Leeeroy Jennnkinnns! VIP Member

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    toast and simpleroot are the same underlying method, for 2.1. Simpleroot is just a graphical user interface that allows you to push a few buttons, and behind the scenes, it's doing toast's method for a full root.

    Unrevoked3 is a half-root method for 2.1. It puts superuser on your phone but does not unlock NAND. You can still flash ROMs, but not all ROMs' features may work when NAND remains locked.

    Unrevoked forever is a doorway to potentially fully rooting your phone. It does not put superuser on your phone, but it does unlock NAND. Once NAND is unlocked, you can manually root your phone by flashing a custom recovery image, and from there, a rooted ROM. The procedure can be a bit long, but there are good guides on this forum and elsewhere.

    Unrevoked 3.2 is a new option (still working out the kinks) that works on both 2.1 and 2.2, and gives you a full root. This appears to be the easiest route once they can work out the bugs.
     
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  12. davidclevy

    davidclevy Member

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    Thanks. What programs do a nand backup? Sorry. I searched for nand backup, but nothing there. Also, what does a nand unlock?
     
  13. hortstu

    hortstu Well-Known Member This Topic's Starter

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    Thanks Novox for the detailed explanation.

    So since I'm trying to get a handle on what I'm doing if I was going to go with simple root I'd probably learn more with toast?

    ***EDIT: Ok so reading a little more about simple root since I saw you used it Novox. I think I need HTC sync to do a simple root and since I'm strictly an Ubuntu user I think that rules out that option for me?

    Not sure exactly what "NAND" is or why I wouldn't want it unlocked. I assume that's where someone like me could do some irreversible damage?

    Isn't getting superuser privileges the point of rooting?

    If I root using one of the older methods would their be a reason to "reverse" the root to a stock evo and then re root with this new method once the kinks are out? Other than of course just learning how to do the method?
     
  14. novox77

    novox77 Leeeroy Jennnkinnns! VIP Member

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    Try downloading the Android SDK for linux. It comes bundled with adb. That is what you need to do toast's method manually.


    You're a linux user, so not sure if you know about this, but in Windows, there are tons of settings that are set by default to prevent you from doing "irreversible" damage. For example: hiding of system files, prevention of viewing folders like /Windows and /system32, etc. Basically, the OS is trying to protect you from doing something stupid. It's probably the right decision for the average user, but it's an annoyance for power users.

    The phone uses solid-state memory for its storage, and NAND is the type of flash technology used. NAND locked simply refers to a bootloader security system that mounts certain partitions as read-only so you can't accidentally screw up system files. The security system also prevents you from flashing unsigned content, i.e. custom ROMs.

    You are absolutely right, and the confusion arises because of the way the term "rooting" is applied. Strictly speaking, rooting means adding superuser so that applications can call su for root permissions. But there are two more components lumped into the "rooting" process that technically has nothing to do with the linux root.

    One is the flashing of a custom recovery image. This is an isolated partition that's intended to be used to recover your system if something goes wrong. The stock recovery image doesn't allow flashing of ROMs, so after root access is gained, the stock recovery is replaced with one that is unnerfed. Personally, I would call this a jailbreak, because it unlocks functionality.

    The other component is the bootloader where NAND is locked by default. A full root exploit replaces the stock bootloader (but not on the Droid X, poor souls) with an Engineering bootloader with NAND unlocked (aka S-OFF).

    A full root procedure is one that gives you S-OFF, a custom recovery image, and superuser. Unrevoked forever gives you S-OFF, which allows you to give yourself a custom recovery and flash a su ROM. So it's not a full root, but it enables you to go full. And if you still think that's silly, the real advantage of unrevoked forever is that the S-OFF flag is very difficult to undo. Unlike toast's method, the S-OFF flag is not bound with the bootloader. So if the bootloader is ever overwritten by an OTA update, you still have NAND unlocked. So unrevoked forever is a way to prevent you from ever accidentally losing rooting ability.

    As long as you fully root (meaning you have NAND unlocked, a custom recovery, and superuser), you don't ever need to re-root your phone. The only exception is if you want the sticky S-OFF that unrevoked forever provides. And in that case, you don't need to undo your root to get it.

    These were awesome questions, btw. And hopefully I was able to help you understand. I know it can be hard to find specific answers. Usually the info you need is buried on page 69 on one of the many android forums out there.
     
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  15. hortstu

    hortstu Well-Known Member This Topic's Starter

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    I've been reading this Idiot proof tutorial.

    http://androidforums.com/evo-4g-all...-proof-root-guide-nand-unlock-adb-update.html

    It's set up for windows however it seems that up until section V, that the Windows computer is just being used to download stuff and get it to the sd card faster.

    Section V is about installing 3 types of software. 7zip, which there is a Linux version of, HTC sync = Windows only, whatever sense that makes for a piece of hardware that's meant to be opensource... and Android sdk which also has a Linux version.

    I've just read through all 60 steps and don't see htc sync being used any here. Am I wrong about this being linux compatible?
     
  16. novox77

    novox77 Leeeroy Jennnkinnns! VIP Member

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    the only reason HTC Sync is mentioned in any root process is to get the USB drivers for Windows machines. Since you are running linux, don't bother. Download the Android SDK and see if adb works with your phone. Make sure your phone is in USB debugging mode.

    Try this tutorial for the SDK installation:
    [HOW-TO]Set up Android SDK/ADB/Fastboot on Ubuntu Linux - xda-developers

    Hope that helps. Unfortunately, I've never done any adb work on a linux box, so I can't personally verify any particular procedure...

    But once adb is working and can find your phone, you can proceed with the rooting procedure.
     
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  17. hortstu

    hortstu Well-Known Member This Topic's Starter

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    Novox,

    Thanks again for all your help. I'm sure I'll have more questions as I get closer to rooting but you've been very helpful... I still mean to address your last post as well.
     
  18. EarlyMon

    EarlyMon The PearlyMon Moderator

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  19. hortstu

    hortstu Well-Known Member This Topic's Starter

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    EarlyMon, Thanks. I don't know if it's helpful yet either but it certainly can't hurt.
     
  20. hortstu

    hortstu Well-Known Member This Topic's Starter

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    Does it not work with some Evo 4g phones? Or do you mean see if it works with my OS?

    Yeah I looked at it, it seems that was for an older version of Ubuntu than I am using. Im hesitant to use it because of that.

    Nonetheless I appreciate all your help.

    So I'll download the Android SDK for linux and see what happens. I'll post my results here.

    __________________
     
  21. EarlyMon

    EarlyMon The PearlyMon Moderator

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    Yeah - pretty sure the idea was limited to your OS revision.

    OK - just fwiw - here's the raw link to the Android dev site for the sdk (probably you've already found this - but just in case) -

    Android SDK | Android Developers

    And remember - everything is going to go overboard where you're concerned on getting things going for root because you don't need all of the full rigamarole of the software developer's kit (until/unless you want to become an Android dev) - your primary concern is getting to the Android debug bridge (adb) tool so you can monkey the right files back and forth across that USB pipe.

    It's super simple to know if you know if you're on the right track in Linux.

    Once you have the sdk downloaded (you can add the yadda-sdk-yadda/tools to your $PATH or just ./ it) I'm about 99.99% sure you can test it with the simple devices command - this shows me doing it with and without my Evo connected, in that order:

    Code (Text):
    1. maps:tools earlymon$ ./adb devices
    2. List of devices attached
    3. HT05THL03786    device
    4.  
    5. maps:tools earlymon$ ./adb devices
    6. List of devices attached
    7.  
    8. maps:tools earlymon$
    9.  
    And there's no magic to knowing adb commands -

    Android Debug Bridge | Android Developers

    Hopefully my attempt at simplifying wasn't overkill either! :p
     
  22. hortstu

    hortstu Well-Known Member This Topic's Starter

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    I wouldnt call it overkill but better overkill than underkill.

    Yeah exactly I was looking at it last night and it's saying I need eclipse, JDK, apache or something... So I gave up and went to bed. Not sure exactly what I need to just get adb. I have some ideas that may have me wanting to develop but that's probably a long way off.

    Seems I can get files back and forth now simply by dragging and dropping but I imagine there is more to it.

    So I downloaded and extracted the android-sdk. Are you saying I should just enter this code in the terminal with and without my phone attached and see if I get the proper reaction?
     
  23. EarlyMon

    EarlyMon The PearlyMon Moderator

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    You can drag and drop to the sd card only. Adb gets you to any filesystem on the phone.

    And yes - if you get the proper adb reaction with just the sdk installed, you can safely skip setting up Eclipse and so forth, in my opinion.

    The rooting methods comes down to a series of steps putting various files at strategic locations and then booting/using the bootloader.
     
  24. STYX

    STYX Well-Known Member

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