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Accessories 16GIG Class 2 card reading as 14.9GIG.

Discussion in 'Android Devices' started by Nagrom, Jul 8, 2010.

  1. Nagrom

    Nagrom Well-Known Member
    Thread Starter
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    May 28, 2010
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    Hi Boardies.

    Okay so I just got my new class 2 16GIG card. Yeah I know Class 2 is slowest of the range, but it's also the cheapest.

    However when I first put it in the phone, it's reading 14.9GIG. Even after formatting it it still reads the same.

    I'm not that clued up on MSD cards, is this normal?

    Andy
     

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  2. Casual Pete

    Casual Pete Well-Known Member
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    Yes that's normal.If you look at your computers hard drive it will be the same.Something to do with the way manufacturers measure the size.
     
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  3. Pryomancer

    Pryomancer Well-Known Member
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    Mar 29, 2010
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    It's normal, due to some formatting process, or how they're built, or something like that, memory storage devices like memory cards, usb sticks, hard drives in ipods etc, always display a lower capacity than stated. It's just how it is. My 320gb hdd on my pc only formats to 293~gb, that's over 20gb lost.
     
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  4. samdale36

    samdale36 Well-Known Member
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    I think its something to do with manufacturers basing the number of Gb on there being 1000Mb in a Gb. In reality, there are 1024Mb in a Gb so the computer/phone shows less (these figures are approximate but you get the idea).

    This explains it in a more complicated manner Hard drive showing wrong capacity? Here's why. - PCMech Forums
     
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  5. anoniemouse

    anoniemouse Well-Known Member
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    On a pc 1 gb = 1024 mb but hard drive manufactures & memory card manufactures class 1gb = 1000 mb therefore a computer will always read it as less than 1gb
     
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  6. Nagrom

    Nagrom Well-Known Member
    Thread Starter
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    Okay guys, as usual this board proves to be the most friendly, and helpful I've ever been a member of.

    Thanks all.

    Andy
     
  7. thelostmango

    thelostmango New Member
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    Yeah, not only do they calculate gigabytes as 1000mb, but a megabyte as 1000kb and a kilobyte as 1000 bytes.

    So the manufacturer is giving you 16,000,000,000 bytes. The computer converts this into 16,000,000,000/(1024
     
  8. SUroot

    SUroot Well-Known Member
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    UK Technical Lead; Desktop Support
    Riddlesden, West Yorkshire, UK
    Although most of the posts in this thread are correct there is a technical inaccuracy which my pedantic side just can't allow. GB, MB, gigabyte, megabyte. Gb, Mb, gigabit, megabit. Bytes usually used as sizes and bits sometimes used as transfer speeds. A bit is 1/8th of a byte. This is why when internet.explorer gives a lower KB/s than you expect to be downloading....

    Nothing to do with the post but I'm bored and had to.get it off my chest
     
  9. lekky

    lekky Lover
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  10. matttye

    matttye Well-Known Member
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    Almost every country in the world uses a decimal number system (I can't think of a single one that doesn't - feel free to enlighten me if there are any.) For that reason I think the most logical way to measure things is also using a decimal system, not hexadecimal, binary or any other numeric system. It would make more sense for computers to adopt the sizes used by manufacturers.
     
  11. SUroot

    SUroot Well-Known Member
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    UK Technical Lead; Desktop Support
    Riddlesden, West Yorkshire, UK


    Binary is the native language computers run on. Its a technological standard. It has to count in binary. Why not use binary?
    Imperial measurements arent metric, therefore not entirety decimal.
     
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