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ADB connection problems

Discussion in 'Android Lounge' started by Colins2, Apr 11, 2020.

  1. Colins2

    Colins2 Lurker
    Thread Starter

    I have just started writing Android apps. They are just for my own education / amusement.
    I have Android Studio installed on both a Windows10 setup and Debian Linux. Both systems are on the same physical computer and therefore connect to the same router on the same network.

    I can write and test my apps on the emulators on both systems and they work fine.

    I have 2 TV boxes that I am also practicing on, both working and both on the same network.
    I connected to both of them using adb over TCP/IP under Windows and installed and ran my app on them - no problem.
    Since then, I had to reboot my computer and now they won't connect. If I use the standard command and the default port 5555 then I get error 10031. If I try a different port I get error 10016.
    There are numerous posts online about this but none of the remedies work for me.
    I think it is a Windoze problem because If I boot into Debian Linux and run Android Studio and adb on there, I can connect to both boxes and run my app. Going back to Windows again still gives the same errors. I have re-booted everything and nothing helps.

    Obviously, both boxes have developer mode enabled. This is not a network issue, everything is on the same network. I do not have the option to connect via USB cable as many of the solutions suggest but I can't see why that would change anything. USB / TCP/IP are totally different protocols.

    Any ideas will be gratefully accepted!
    Colin
     


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  2. MoodyBlues

    MoodyBlues Compassion is cool!
    VIP Member

    Welcome to Android Forums, Colins2! :)
    Oh my goodness! That's one of the ways I used to spell it; I'm currently happy with 'window$' instead. :D
    Yep, there you go, it's window$ up to its usual nonsensical business.

    Personally, I'd take it as a hint that you should reformat that hard drive and install Linux on the whole thing. [Of course, I've been *nix-only for 35 years, and I'm an avowed window$ hater, so this isn't exactly shocking. :)] Seriously, what's stopping you from dumping window$?
     
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  3. Colins2

    Colins2 Lurker
    Thread Starter

    HaHa! Thanks.
    I have also had Linux since the days of 2 floppies, boot and root:) and *nix in general since I found an old Sys V server in a 2nd hand shop back in the late 80s.
    Dumping Window$ (I like that) is quite difficult. It's not that I love the OS but most of my working life I have had to use Windows and that tends to spill over to the home desktop as well. Yes, I know there are Linux applications that will do almost everything that a Windows one will but there are still compatibility issues and I guess it is easier to just use Window$. - Laziness! The worst offenders are docx files. Although Open Office / Libra Office will read/write most of them they don't handle all the formatting, especially tables, so I end up having to use M$Office and Windoze.
    I use Rad Studio at times and that is a Win program. I also use Qt but that runs on all platforms but although both will compile Android code, neither of them support my old TV box running Android 4.2.2. For that reason I had to switch to Android Studio which does support it.
    Actually, I've started using Kotlin as I never really got on with Java so it wasn't a bad move :)

    This TCP/IP issue is a real nuisance - maybe Linux forums might be a better place to look!
     
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  4. MrJavi

    MrJavi Android Expert

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  5. MoodyBlues

    MoodyBlues Compassion is cool!
    VIP Member

    I'm glad you're here, @Colins2! I always enjoy seeing new members who are fellow *nix people, AND who see the humor in writing 'window$' instead of 'Windows.' [I think that's the first time I've capitalized that here... :thinking:]
    Ehh...I hate to say it, but since it works as it should on the Linux side...you're probably going to need help on a window$ forum. :eek:

    By the way, if you're around here for long [as I hope you'll be], you'll quickly find that I'm passionate about Linux--nauseatingly so, I'm sure, to some people! I can often be found touting my favorite distribution, Kubuntu. I'd love to hear about your favorite(s) and how you ended up there.

    You mentioned a Sys V box in the '80s. Did it have X Window or was it strictly CLI? My first exposure was on Tandy, then SCO, Xenix. CLI all the way! At home, I used Coherent--a wonderful, but now long-forgotten UNIX clone. I believe it cost ≈$100. It came with X Window, but the lone computer I had back then, a 386/20, which I added 2MB of RAM to--to bring it up to a whopping 4MB--just wasn't up to it. No problem, I loved the command line. :)
     
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  6. Colins2

    Colins2 Lurker
    Thread Starter

    Thanks, pleased to be here :D
     
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  7. Colins2

    Colins2 Lurker
    Thread Starter

    By the way, if you're around here for long [as I hope you'll be], you'll quickly find that I'm passionate about Linux--nauseatingly so, I'm sure, to some people! I can often be found touting my favorite distribution, Kubuntu. I'd love to hear about your favorite(s) and how you ended up there.

    You mentioned a Sys V box in the '80s. Did it have X Window or was it strictly CLI? My first exposure was on Tandy, then SCO, Xenix. CLI all the way! At home, I used Coherent--a wonderful, but now long-forgotten UNIX clone. I believe it cost ≈$100. It came with X Window, but the lone computer I had back then, a 386/20, which I added 2MB of RAM to--to bring it up to a whopping 4MB--just wasn't up to it. No problem, I loved the command line. :)[/QUOTE]
    HeHe, I know who to ask about Linux problems then.....

    The Sys V box was a Bleasdale Centurion and was basically a file server. It had been owned by Root Computers who very thoughtfully had removed all the passwords, making it easily accessible. (So when I entered 'root' as a user name, it let me in) It was purely CLI as far as I remember but anyway that's how I used it with the terminal.
    I struggled with it for a while but in the end connected my trusty old BBC B to it and used it as a terminal. I seem to remember it had about a dozen ports on the back with none of them obviously for monitor, keyboard etc. The monitor port was not for a display! I just went on from there really. I got a PC, a 286, and used that with a VT100 terminal emulator and things were much better. I just played around with it writing bits of code and shell scripts and managed to port Little Smalltalk to it which was a lot of work, but good fun. It wasn't very powerful though; it was a 68010 chip with 1536kb ram and a small 20mb MFM hard drive and not really any option to expand it. I did actually find someone who knew about the model of computer and actually knew Eddie Bleasdale! He was very surprised that it was all still operational.

    Then Linux came along which ran on my 286 and since then I have always had a linux boot. My first was Yggdrasil which could access my Philips CD rom - not much else could at that time, most CD roms had proprietary interfaces! I have tried a lot of distros over the years and also Solaris when it was still Sun and now have 2 installations, Linux Mint and Debian. Mint is, I suppose, easier - more Windows like but I read that Debian was better for programming and I am very happy with it. I used Fedora for a few years but the upgrade cycle was a pain. I also had Oracle Linux, very good, very stable but a pain to try to configure anything.
    I suppose that now the internet is so much more accessible, any of the main distros are fine and have easy access to updates. For now, though, I am happy with Debian.

    There you go, a potted history. I'm getting on a bit now and retired so I have time on my hands and no deadlines to meet :)
    Colin
     
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  8. Colins2

    Colins2 Lurker
    Thread Starter

    Fixed :D

    After a lot of searching it turns out it was my VPN that was at fault although that wasn't immediately obvious.
    It has to do with the TAP connector (at least that's what it is called on my system) It was preventing adb working. There was also another VPN in my system that wasn't used so I guess some conflict between them.
    It wasn't obvious because I had internet access and everything seemed to be working apart from adb.

    So the easy fix would seem to be to disable and uninstall the vpn client, make sure adb will connect to the device and then re-install the vpn client.

    It probably didn't help following advice on the MS forum where I reset the networking and TCP stack - none of which had much effect and may have also upset the system.

    I stress this fix is only related to adb not connecting over TCP/IP and giving errors 10013 / 10016
     
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