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Android tutoring

Discussion in 'Android Lounge' started by undone98, Feb 11, 2012.

  1. undone98

    undone98 Newbie
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    so i recently made it to the 2nd round of an interview for a job where i would be tutoring older people on how to use new technology (anything from androids to pc software) in a 1 on 1 setting. the interviewer asked me a question that i had never thought about before. He asked me how i would find out what my clients would need to learn and told me that when i came back for the 2nd interview to bring my answer with me.

    so far i haven't come up with much other than asking to look at their phones, tablets, laptops, etc. and asking them questions about their troubles and goals with the specific products.

    anyone here have any other methods they would use for discerning what information someone would need?
     

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  2. KEB64

    KEB64 Newbie
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    Well. Questions I would ask somebody is "What do you want out of your device? What do you want it to do for you? What are your expectations?" I'd simply ask, then listen. Then I'd advise. Your solutions should be tailored to the individual. Devices are capable of so much these days, chances are everybody won't wanna use their device for EVERYTHING. That's my 2 cents.
     
  3. Sideman

    Sideman Well-Known Member
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    Yep. Ask simple, broad-based, questions as mentioned above. And LISTEN to the answers. Listening will give you more information than talking. You're not there to convince anyone how knowledgeable you are. You're there to give them what they want...knowledge.

    IMHO you're answer would be...to ask "What do you want to be able to do with your ???? device?", and then listen, listen, listen....speaking only when you need to prompt him/her to continue explaining their needs. The client will reveal what he/she wants, even if he/she says he/she doesn't know.

    has worked for me for many years. People love to talk about what they want/need.

    And take notes...don't rely on your memory.
     
  4. lunatic59

    lunatic59 Moderati ergo sum
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    If by 'older people' you mean seniors, then you also might consider asking their children or caregivers what they'd like to see your clients be able to do. For example, they might not know what Skype is so they wouldn't even know it's a possibility to video chat with their grandchildren, or that they could see family albums on Facebook.
     
  5. 2012

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    Very often they won't have a clue of a large percentage of what their device is capable of. As well as asking what they want to be able to do you also need to have a list of things that they could want to be able to do but were unaware of.

    Keep it simple though. Don't go suggesting anything you can't teach in 5 minutes.
     
  6. Sinthor

    Sinthor Lurker
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    I agree with all of the above suggestions. Look, technical people often cannot communicate effectively with non-technical people. Finding a techie who CAN communicate, especially with seniors, etc. is difficult and golden. This interviewer probably wants to see if you'll come back with some technical type of analysis of how to find out what people need or if you get basic customer service: ask, LISTEN.

    So I say you start with simply asking people what the most frustrating things about their device are to them, what they want to be able to do, or simply what it is that they'd like to know the most. Think customer service and how people who are NOT technically skilled think and view their devices, not about your own perspective of figuring out a new technology and exploring it. That difference is almost like a cultural divide and that divide is like the Grand Canyon. If you're a person who can effectively bridge that gap, you can write your own ticket in a number of jobs.
     
  7. !on

    !on Android Expert
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    It's a tough one. I would first ask if they are familiar with computers, because smartphones are pocket computers.

    I fear that most "old" people will just give up if they're not familiar with computers. Enough younger adults don't know how to work even basic phones, it's quite shocking really.

    I would have thought the main thing is to offer them a product that fits their needs. No need to be explaining something that they wouldn't use.

    After that, you would have a quick grasp of what's set out in the start up manual, & can voice these key points to them. Start with the basics.
     
  8. argedion

    argedion The TechnoFrog
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    The Infernal Swamp
    With seniors its about relationship. They don't want fancy flashy people they want/need people who are interested in them and their lives. You also have to watch your step around them find out what information you can before getting with them.

    Is Spouse Living? If not how long ago did they depart? How long was the couple together, Whats the relationship like with the kids?

    First question I would ask is how are you today? (yes your here to do a job but don't be focused so much on teaching them but relating with them.)
     
  9. dan330

    dan330 Extreme Android User
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    answer ... listen.

    show them something very interesting that you just found out about your device..
    then ask them .. what would you like to do with it? then listen
     

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