Can't buy hardware with Play Store credit!

Basically, Google screwed me out of $60 a few days ago. I wanted the brand new wireless charger they're selling. Bought $60 worth of Play Store gift cards, redeemed them, put the charger in my cart. Until... surprise surprise... can't use Play Store credit to buy any sort of hardware.

This isn't indicated anywhere on the cards or the product page. It IS however in the terms of service (which I eventually found out), but who actually reads through all 10 pages of that before buying? The product page should clearly say "PLAY STORE CREDIT CAN'T BE APPILED TO THIS ITEM".

This is a recurring problem for them. I read stories of people buying $300 of Play Store credit, only to find this out and lose their money. And Google gets to keep all that money. It's a complete racket they have going on here.

In any case, f*** Google... I want my money back. And why can't I use Play Store credit to buy something in the Play Store!!!
 

Rukbat

Extreme Android User
If you're in the US, check your state laws. Unless this particular "term of service" is stated on the gift card (or what it's attached to) in letters as large as <whatever the state requires, and it's usually a pretty readable size), the terms may not apply to purchases made in your state. (And, if you have to hire an attorney to cause them to comply with the law, they may have to pay the attorney's fees.)
 

frame_of_mind

Newbie
Thread starter
I am in California, specifically Cupertino. How would I check which laws apply and hire an attorney? Google has been extremely unhelpful, and has me so pissed off right now, that I would be happy to take legal action and hopefully make them change their ways.

Honestly, I called them three times, and every time, their customer service drones may as well be tape recorders on repeat parroting their obscure terms of service.

This has totally soured my experience with Android, which is a shame. My Nexus 7 is a wonderful tablet, but Google sucks so much at customer service that I'm going to sell it and be rid of this horrible company.
 

frame_of_mind

Newbie
Thread starter
There's nothing inherently wrong with their policy, except it's not clearly indicated anywhere on the gift card, or on the product webpages.

For example: Nexus Wireless Charger.
How would I know, based on this webpage alone, that gift cards do not apply?

The story that Mike linked is not the only one I read. People are spending hundreds, sometimes thousands, on Google Play credit expecting to buy smartphones and tablets, only to find out they can't and Google says tough luck and pockets the cash.

Yes, this policy is outlined in the Terms of Service, but you cannot reasonably expect anyone to read the entire thing before buying something. There should be a CLEAR notice on the product page.

Even more infuriating: WHY DOES PLAY STORE CREDIT NOT APPLY TO ITEMS LISTED ON THE PLAY STORE? It makes no sense!!! No other online store is so confused! Microsoft & Apple have the exact same policy, except they divide hardware & apps into two separate stores, with different kinds of gift cards for each. Amazon combines hardware & apps on their website, but Amazon gift cards apply to both; no limitations. Get a clue, Google!

I have already filed a complaint with the attorney general. If anyone can refer me to relevant California laws, and an attorney or law firm which can help me with gift card laws, then I would greatly appreciate it. I am in the Santa Clara County area of California.
 

frame_of_mind

Newbie
Thread starter
Just don't understand why someone would spend that much on Google Play credit instead of buying it outright?
Two scenarios I can think of:

1. You don't have a credit card, so you pay cash for the gift cards, intending to buy a device on the Play Store.

2. The gift cards are given to you by family, the family member(s) being under the impression that you can use the gift cards to buy phones/tablets on the Play Store.
 

frame_of_mind

Newbie
Thread starter
Unfortunately, no. I already redeemed the cards, so the store (GameStop) won't take them back. And Google will not refund me for whatever BS accounting reason they have.

Right now $60 is sitting in my Google Wallet untouched. I don't understand why they can't deduct the $60 and refund the money to me.
 

bjacks12

Android Expert
Two scenarios I can think of:

1. You don't have a credit card, so you pay cash for the gift cards, intending to buy a device on the Play Store.

2. The gift cards are given to you by family, the family member(s) being under the impression that you can use the gift cards to buy phones/tablets on the Play Store.

1. If you don't have a credit card, at least get a debit card man. It's 2013. Are there even any banks left that don't offer free debit cards with a checking account? There's no way in hell I'll ever go back to dealing only in cash. What if I lost my wallet or it got stolen? At least with cards, I can call into my bank immediately and shut the cards down.

2. Yeah, there's not much you can do there I guess.
 

zuben el genub

Extreme Android User
Does anything from Play get refunded after the 15 minute limit on apps?
I bought apps that took that long to download! The dev is extremely honest so it didn't bother me about a refund.
 

breadnatty08

pain rustique
Does anything from Play get refunded after the 15 minute limit on apps?
I bought apps that took that long to download! The dev is extremely honest so it didn't bother me about a refund.

I think I read in one of those FAQ's in regards to Wallet refunds that after 15min, you're on your own and Google isn't going to help. They suggest doing just what you said and contact the developer about a refund.
 

Kelmar

Done by choice
This isn't indicated anywhere on the cards or the product page. It IS however in the terms of service (which I eventually found out), but who actually reads through all 10 pages of that before buying? The product page should clearly say "PLAY STORE CREDIT CAN'T BE APPILED TO THIS ITEM".

This is a recurring problem for them. I read stories of people buying $300 of Play Store credit, only to find this out and lose their money. And Google gets to keep all that money. It's a complete racket they have going on here

Respectfully, those Terms of Service are there for a reason. The one for the Play Store gift cards, as an example (found HERE) isn't 10 pages. It's one... maybe two tops. When you redeem the codes/cards there is a is a link to the Terms and Conditions. The point in question is in point #2 titled Limitations. Even quickly reviewing this would have made anyone stop and say "wait... there are limitations to what/how I can you it??" Respectfully, you could and should have read it.

Does it suck, sure! But don't expect Google to refund it when it's clearly there in black and white.

Terms and Conditions said:
2. Limitations. The Gift Card may be used for purchases of eligible items on Google Play only. Limits may apply to redemption and use. Items ineligible for purchase using gift card include subscriptions, as well as items in the device section of Google Play including hardware such as phones, tablets and related device accessories. The Gift Card is not redeemable for cash or other cards, is not reloadable or refundable, cannot be combined with other non-Google Play balances in your Google Wallet account, and cannot be resold, exchanged or transferred for value, except as required by law. If you have insufficient Google Play balances to pay for an item on Google Play, you may use a credit or debit card to purchase additional value so that you may complete your payment for that item. You may also load another gift card to complete your purchase, or may use a different form of payment altogether to purchase the item. Once a Google Play Gift Card is purchased, the risk of loss and title for the Gift Card passes to the purchaser. GPC disclaims all express or implied warranties as to the Google Play Gift Card and Google Play. Gift Card terms may be subject to change in our sole discretion subject to applicable law.

Find some apps or books or music, buy 'em and chalk it up to a lesson learned.
 

frame_of_mind

Newbie
Thread starter
NOBODY reads the Terms of Service before buying anything. Based on your reasoning, Google could add "Play Store Credit can't be used on anything in the Play Store; no refunds; neener neener neener" and take all our money.

There should be a clear notice that says Play Store Credit doesn't apply to hardware. This note should be placed somewhere everyone can see, such as next to the "buy" button.

In any case, Google can f*** themselves. I sold my Nexus 7 and transferred the $60 to someone else who will make better use of it. Never had so much hassle with Apple. Had an issue with the iTunes store in the past, and they were happy to refund my money. I will never buy another Google device again and will advise all friends & family of their horrible customer service.
 

Kelmar

Done by choice
Incorrect on both counts. MANY people read the Terms and Conditions. I, for one, read them. Lawyers, as another, read them. Do you read CC offers before you apply? Contracts before buying a car or home? They are there to protect the buyer and the seller. They were created (not specifically) because of situations like this were a buyer got upset and decided to sue.

The Terms and Conditions not only protect the seller (in this case Google) but also YOU as a buyer.

You truly cannot be upset because you didn't chose to look at the clearly marked Terms and Conditions (heck, these didn't even read in lawyer terms) and Google decided to enforce them.

Once again, sorry that it happened that way... but can you blame them?? REALLY!?


Either way... hope you are happier with Apple. It sounds like you will be. :)
 

frame_of_mind

Newbie
Thread starter
I don't believe you. Do you read the entire Terms of Service every time you buy a $0.99 song, beginning to end, to make sure you catch every single loophole? You're either lying or exaggerating.

Lawyers don't read them either. Maybe if it's part of their job, as in they're representing someone suing Google for ambiguous Terms of Service. But a lawyer who's off the clock, at home, trying to relax? Hell no.

And yes, this is a GOOGLE problem. This is a RECURRING problem for them. People have lost hundreds of dollars because of this legal technicality and it's not right. Their customer service agents will admit is a recurring issue for them. This is Google's fault, and it's infuriating because it would be so freaking easy for them to fix.
 

Kelmar

Done by choice
I don't believe you. Do you read the entire Terms of Service every time you buy a $0.99 song, beginning to end, to make sure you catch every single loophole? You're either lying or exaggerating.

Lawyers don't read them either. Maybe if it's part of their job, as in they're representing someone suing Google for ambiguous Terms of Service. But a lawyer who's off the clock, at home, trying to relax? Hell no.

And yes, this is a GOOGLE problem. This is a RECURRING problem for them. People have lost hundreds of dollars because of this legal technicality and it's not right. Their customer service agents will admit is a recurring issue for them. This is Google's fault, and it would be so freaking easy for them to fix.

I'm not sure how this is becoming a personal attack on what I do or do not do (which ironically enough is against the Terms and Conditions that you agreed to when signing up for this site). Being called a liar when you know NOTHING about me is insulting. Please note that I have and will continue to be respectful while addressing you. But since you asked, yes, I read EACH AND EVERY line of EVERY Term and Condition that I accept. No lying... no exaggerating. I read the Terms and Conditions when opening the Play Store the first time and when buying a new phone. I read every line of contract for everything I sign or agree to.


In regards to your orignal thread complaint, sure, I guess Google COULD change it... but they haven't. So for now all they do is enforce (you know... because customer service reps are the ones who wrote it and have the authority to override everything ;)) what they are told to enforce. But seeing as you sold your N7 and now hate Google I guess it really doesn't matter. :smokingsomb:

Like I said before, it sucks. But that's part of learning and living. Be glad that it only cost you $60 (that could be used for other things) rather than getting a bill for thousands of dollars or finding out you paid 3 times what you should have for something.
 

unnamedny

Android Expert
There is nothing new, move on. If you buy things without knowing what you can spend it on, you deserve it. All stores have policies regarding gift cards and if you can't buy gift cards using gift card there is nothing to be surprised of. etcetera etcetera.
 

mikedt

你好
I don't believe you. Do you read the entire Terms of Service every time you buy a $0.99 song, beginning to end, to make sure you catch every single loophole? You're either lying or exaggerating.

You're not expected to do that at all, and that would be unreasonable. However you are expected to read the ToS or EULA in it's entirety and agree to it when you sign up though. e.g. when you install iTunes or there's a revision to the EULA, you click and agree to it, stating that you've read and agree to the terms.

BTW you might want to watch an episode of South Park called "HUMANCENTiPAD", it's all about what could possibly happen if you don't read the terms and conditions you're agreeing to.
 
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