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Root [CDMA] Rooting - Wifi Hotspot still capped?

Discussion in 'Android Devices' started by zukracer, Jun 27, 2011.

  1. zukracer

    zukracer Lurker
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    I was in the store today talking to the Sprint rep and he told me that rooted phones are being searched out and accounts closed in breech of contract (fees, charges, etc). After some techie talk about other computer stuff, he finally broke down and explained that it was something with port use from other devices since almost all phone based apps use the same port/protocol.

    There's about 10000 reasons for me to upgrade from my current blackberry :rolleyes: but being able to use the wifi hotspot with my ipad (without the monthly raping of $30 :D ) was certainly on the top of my list.

    Any truth to what this guy was telling me? Anyone here using other rooted devices and finding issues using other devices connected to the hotspot? I've used my laptop tethered using PDANet and it has worked for a long time but the IPad wants a wifi connection for certain things (facetime,etc). Any other "rooting" benefits besides removing bloat and stuff like turning on the wifi that are worth knowing in the decision to do it once its available for the 3D?

    Thanks in advance
     

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  2. lafester

    lafester Android Enthusiast
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    I think we would know about it if this was happening.
     
  3. zukracer

    zukracer Lurker
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    Yeah I kinda thought he was just blowing smoke up my crack but seemed worth checking with folks that are rooting things today :cool:

    I'm totally new to rooting and the android system so I'm learning a TON but really trying to figure out if the Evo 3D is worth the money or if there is something else around the corner that does it better....or if getting a standard EVO is more rootable than others.

    Any info you guys have would be great, I'm reading threads and other sites but its like drinking from the fire hose :D
     
  4. jerofld

    jerofld Fixing stuff is not easy
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    Over there <points>
    Check out the thread in the main forum that compares the evo 3d to the sgs2 to the proton. These are the next generation smartphones.

    Also, it is complete crap that they monitor for rooting. They can monitor all they want, but they can not end your service for it. The supreme court ruled that jailbreaking (and by extension, rooting) was completely legal to do. They ruled that it can void warranties, but the rooter/jailbreaker can not be punished for jailbreaking/rooting. Now, if you do something that breaks TOS, like get free wifi tether (which is actually against the TOS) and they find out, they can end service. Likely they'll just charge you for it, though.
     
  5. acipollo

    acipollo Well-Known Member
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    All my phones have been rooted. And I always put on the free WiFi tether. And use tons of data. Since the Palm Pre. So 2 yrs. They haven't shut me down yet! :)
     
  6. falconey

    falconey Android Enthusiast
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    I was tethering off old blackberry's when it was as simple as setting up some dial up 4 digit phone number. That was a long time ago and didn't require root. For the whole time I had my EVO 4G it was rooted with wifi tether. I'm a Sprint customer for over 10 years so I guess they didn't get rid of me. On a side note, I never abused the network. I tethered for simple browsing or emailing.
     
  7. cmcollins001

    cmcollins001 Well-Known Member
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    This post is older, but I wanted to throw in my $.02.

    I researched this a lot while I was on the fence about rooting my Evo 4G. I read somewhere (I don't remember exactly where, it may even be in the Evo 4G forum here) that Sprint will not keep any of it's customers from being able to use any app that is available for their phone/device. Also, in that same article (I believe) the question about PDAnet, and others like PDAnet and wireless tethering was asked of a Sprint CSR on the phone, and to sum up the answer, PDAnet is considered "fine" because it's just using your wire tethering to your own computer, with you individually using the data you pay for. However, with wireless tethering you can share your data with up to 8 devices, therefore allowing non-Sprint customers to use the data free. This sorta makes sense to me. Somebody explained it like going to an all you can eat buffet, paying for one person, then having 7 friends join you and they hit the buffet off your one ticket. What I got from this was that, as a Sprint customer, you already pay for unlimited data, and you can use it as you wish, but allowing others to use the Sprint network free isn't Sprint's idea of a good business plan. That's where the wifi tethering charges comes into play...you're paying for the ability to share your data plan with anyone, including non-Sprint customers.

    Now, as far as going after rooted phones, that's not gonna happen. I've talked with a few Sprint reps at the store and they all knew my E4G was rooted, I even showed the benefits of rooting. All I was ever told was to make sure I can fix my own issues because my warranty was voided and the Sprint tech wouldn't touch the phone. And, as it was already stated, you're not doing anything illegal or against you're contract by simply rooting the phone. It's your phone, you own it, you can use it as a drink coaster on your coffee table if you want. However, if you take advantage of that root and do something against your TOS, then yes, they can shut you down if caught...if you're caught.

    Ok, so it was a bit more than $.02..but I won't charge for the extra. Just consider it a bonus.
     
  8. novox77

    novox77 Leeeroy Jennnkinnns!
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    Late to the party here, and not sure if OP is still following the thread, but I think the OP misunderstood the Sprint rep a little bit.

    He's not saying that they have some way to block uncommon port usage (although they definitely have that power). What he's saying is that they look for uncommon port usage as circumstantial evidence of unauthorized wifi tether. While they can certainly check for that (along with a bunch of other stuff), whether they actually do on a systematic basis is unlikely.

    I would think that to become a target of an investigation, you have to really stand out in your data usage. Something needs to first set off a flag.

    But before Sprint does anything punitive, everything that's tethered to your phone should work just fine.

    If Sprint ever decides to collect evidence against you for tethering, all of the evidence will be circumstantial. What does that mean exactly? It means no given piece of evidence will be 100% conclusive, but it provides a strong implication that tethering is happening. Here's an example:

    Let's say you've tethered your phone to 3 computers in your home, and someone on each computer is surfing the web on three different browsers. Each browser request contains a user-agent that gives away what browser and version you're actually using. My current user-agent is:

    Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 6.1; WOW64; rv:5.0) Gecko/20100101 Firefox/5.0

    Someone using IE, Chrome, Safari, Android, iOS, etc will have a different user agent. If Sprint looks at your data footprint and sees three unique simultaneous user agents being reported, that would look like tethering is going on. But it's circumstantial because it's POSSIBLE that such a circumstance can occur from just using the phone. You'd have to be spoofing user agents and/or using multiple browsers on the phone at roughly the same time and/or running some sort of load test or denial of service app. Very unlikely but still possible.

    Add in what each PC is actually doing: one is reading CNN, one is doing a bittorrent transfer; the final one is playing an MMORPG, and this pattern can be established for multiple days... the picture becomes clearer. Still circumstantial, but it's more damning. Throw in what the OP said about uncommonly used ports, and that's even more circumstantial evidence leading toward tethering.

    So it all depends on what you do while tethering that decides whether Sprint can collect convincing circumstantial evidence against you. If the only thing you do is surf while tethering (on one computer), your data footprint is going to look a LOT like using your phone barring the difference in user agent. But it is trivial to spoof your phone browser's user agent, so the circumstantial evidence Sprint could collect would be weak.

    Given how many customers Sprint has, the percentage of users who are actually rooted, and the percentage of rooted users who actually tether, it's a really small number of people. And of those people, some percentage won't tether enough such that their data usage for the month exceeds that of the average user. I'm unconvinced that for now, unauthorized tethering is a threat to the infrastructure. Therefore, I don't think Sprint would go through the trouble to do a systematic deep forensic sweep looking for signs of tethering. Like I said before, they'll need a red flag first to narrow down the list, like someone using a disproportionately high amount of data.

    But these are my assumptions based on my understanding of what I've described above, along with the fact that I've yet to hear anyone actually get shut down for tethering on Sprint. And if someone posts after this stating they were shut down, I'd be willing to bet that person used a ton of data doing so.
     
  9. Thefoodman52

    Thefoodman52 Android Expert
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    Like the idiots when the Evo 4g was released.

    They would cancel with their ISP, then use NOTHING BUT the rooted phone to provide internet access to their ENTIRE household. They would justify it by saying 'I'm paying for unlimited. Why should I care?'. You should care, because, while you actually paying for 'unlimited' access, the intention of that data would be for your phone primarily. It wasn't intended initially for use by anything else. Just things your phone can/needs to use to work day-to-day.

    Not to say that you have no justification on using your data as you see fit (in my opinion at least). Just don't abuse it basically. I mean, personally, I got a hot spot modem and started service with ClearWire here in Charleston while I'm here (just activated BASE WIDE Wi-Max coverage. Speeds are acceptable, surprisingly.).

    The reason? I use my laptop for quite a bit more than surfing the internets. That would DEFINITELY spike a red flag. I'd more than likely get a cease and desist letter before the end of next week. Not one doubt in my mind on that one. Hell, I checked the data transferred (up and down) off that little spot yesterday, and just from me alone I hit 12gb. That would have been an instant call from Sprint and my account flagged. When I'm travelling or whatever, sure, I use my phone's connection to hop online with my laptop. The reason? For internet browsing and light usage to kill time. I stop my seeding (and torrents in general) when I'm out, and games are on the blacklist of things to do while tethering off my phone.


    That's just me to be honest. I don't go out of my way to intentionally screw companies/businesses over. That and I don't condone the concept of stealing. If I'm well within my range of normal use, I'm fine tethering once in awhile.


    TLDR;
    Your phone's internet connection is intended for your phone. Don't abuse it and Sprint doesn't care.
     
    EarlyMon likes this.
  10. EarlyMon

    EarlyMon The PearlyMon
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    ^This.

    Plus - in protest over Sprint's warranty policies, I emailed CEO Dan Hesse the day I rooted my phone, with my account info, explaining I'd done it because of their bloatware.

    When I do in rare circumstance need wireless tether, I sip from the little fountain and not try to drink from the firehose.
     
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