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Consumer Affairs Alerts

Discussion in 'Android Lounge' started by Phalon4, Jun 7, 2017.

  1. Phalon4

    Phalon4 Android Enthusiast
    Thread Starter



    #1 Phalon4, Jun 7, 2017
    Last edited: Jun 7, 2017
    shalemail and mikedt like this.

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  2. Phalon4

    Phalon4 Android Enthusiast
    Thread Starter

    Well people I advise you to start saving your money because if this thing passes on the Senate floor, you will be charged a Hefty fee for using the internet on all devices that has internet access. The United States has the slowest internet speed of all the so-called civilized countries in the Nations but also has the most expensive internet cost in the world to use. The United States government has been monitoring the billions that has made over the years from the internet and mostly in un- taxed revenue from companies there and abroad. So considering they can't charge every person for using the internet individually, The FTC is going to go after all the companies that has internet access to their business endeavors which will trickle down eventually to the consumer such as the small people such as myself and others just to do business with these companies. So in layman's terms you will be charged to use the internet one way or another.
     
    #2 Phalon4, Jun 7, 2017
    Last edited: Jun 7, 2017
    shalemail likes this.
  3. zuben el genub

    zuben el genub Extreme Android User

    What it means is Comcrap and Netflix will pay less to use more bandwidth. Get on them about rates since they are the ones who will charge. And all your data will belong them.
     
  4. zuben el genub

    zuben el genub Extreme Android User

  5. zuben el genub

    zuben el genub Extreme Android User

  6. Phalon4

    Phalon4 Android Enthusiast
    Thread Starter

    Yes, that's true but this has been a on going issue on Capital Hill for years and just wanting on that great opportunity to rear it's ugly head and take money. The Federal Government has been keeping close eye on America's spending habits on what they would think of as useless spending.

    The Complications of Taxing Internet Commerce
    The issue of taxing the Internet is complicated by several factors: a. With approximately 30,000 taxing jurisdictions, compliance becomes a significant obstacle. The Internet is inherently susceptible to multiple and discriminatory taxation in a way that commerce conducted in more traditional ways is not. Double taxation would be inevitable because the borderless nature of the Internet makes taxation very tricky. If we simply required that merchants collect the relevant tax for the jurisdiction into which the product is being delivered, such legislation would produce a world that is anything but "simple." Can you imagine the confusion that would arise in the case where a small business owner from New Hampshire (a state without sales tax) is required to collect the tax on a purchase made by a consumer living in the Dallas area-- a metropolitan area with numerous suburbs, several of which have different local sales tax rates, in addition to Texas' state tax? Or even more bizarre, consider Internet sales of shoes-- a product that is tax exempt in some states but not others, depending on such factors as whether the footwear in question is tennis shoes, "sneakers," or cleated athletic shoes.(1) b. Since Internet commerce is so new, we do not know what the basic business model will look like in a few years. How can we know how to tax it? There are likely many adverse unintended and unanticipated consequences lurking in the future. c. How would the taxes be collected? One of the main benefits of Web-based businesses is that the ability to reach such a large potential universe of customers cheaply provides an opportunity for small one- and two-person companies to thrive without a tremendous amount of start-up capital. The cost of compliance and tax collection alone for these small businesses could be enough of a deterrent to keep them from participating in the marketplace. Clearly, compelling retailers to collect tax under the current jurisdictional regime would place a significant burden on merchants; and such a burden would likely not be uniformly felt across all retailers. If a recent study by the Washington State Department of Revenue is any indication of things to come, small businesses would be hit hardest with respect to the costs of compliance with multi-jurisdiction tax rates. More specifically, a recent study by one of the Big 5 accounting firms, Ernst and Young, has estimated the costs of compliance of small businesses to be close to 87 percent of the sales tax they collect--a far greater percentage than the 14 percent of the tax collected that it would cost large businesses to comply. While these costs might be eased by employing various software packages, such software can cost well over $ 20,000.(2) In a time where technology finally makes it possible for virtually anyone to realize the American Dream by starting out on his or her own and creating a business from scratch, do we really want to place one more barrier to entry in the form of heavy compliance costs in front of these potential entrepreneurs that might otherwise fuel our economy? d. Another major enforcement issue is identifying the state, country or countries that have tax jurisdiction over income generated by electronic transactions. Electronic commerce permits a foreign person to engage in multiple business transactions with customers in the United States without ever having entered the country.
     
  7. zuben el genub

    zuben el genub Extreme Android User

    Everyone was annoyed with Amazon. They doubled and tripled what the catalog companies used to do ( Sears, Monkey Ward and JC Penney). Amazon does collect some sales tax. I'm not sure exactly what they are basing it on as it differs from the state sales tax. Amazon does not have an physical outlet here - yet.

    If I sell you a phone, no one bothers with the tax. Same as a garage sale or I advertise online.

    That is why no one has done much yet. If you ordered from a Sears catalog, and you had a Sears in the state, that's the tax that would be collected. Not from the selling Sears, but the receiving Sears.

    With larger retailers, they can go to containers. Rent space at a UPS Store, 7-11, wherever. That mdse would be taxed on the pickup area. Smaller retailers would probably be more or less exempted and the burden put on the receiver of the goods to pay the tax same as now. They'd probably decide via type of mdse, and how much before working out a tax.

    There are such startups, and you can investigate for yourself. One is called ETSY. I think it just grew enough to get a IPO. Etsy serves a scad of small retailers.

    Some sell services which are usually NOT taxed here. If you order a custom suit, the tailor would pay all the taxes on the fabric, thread and hard goods. You would be billed for services unless he passed the taxes along to you. Long-Arm quilting is another. Some fabric stores do cross state lines. That is another business that can be checked on.

    From what I understand about Net Neutrality - If Hulu and Netflix both wanted a bandwidth to put out movies, and Netflix paid the ISP more, then Netflix could seriously cut into Hulu's service. This would benefit the ISP as the charge for such favoritism could be under the counter. Both Hulu and Netflix using up more of the ISP bandwidth would leave smaller and smaller chunks for the independents.
     
    #7 zuben el genub, Jun 8, 2017
    Last edited: Jun 8, 2017
  8. Phalon4

    Phalon4 Android Enthusiast
    Thread Starter

    Yes and facts still remains that if any internet business Enterprise's thus will be charged for any collateral transactions. I personally understand the reason why because as the economy continue to grow, there will not be a stalemate to not contribute to the factor's of a economical situations. This is just another step to control mankind vices. Don't forget you're already paying for water that this planet has ⅔% of and soon you will be paying for the air that you breathe and so on. This post was not to cause a debate on what's going to be eventually the inevitable. It was just to bring awareness to the ones that's asleep.
     
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