1. Are you ready for the Galaxy S20? Here is everything we know so far!

Google really has dropped the ball lately.

Discussion in 'Android Lounge' started by mudrock1000, Feb 7, 2011.

  1. mudrock1000

    mudrock1000 Android Enthusiast
    Thread Starter

    This is an opinion. Don't like it? Not my problem.
    Anyways I'm not sure if the n1 has officially recieved Ginerbread (I don't know why you HAVENT unlocked your bootloader if you don't have it yet) But it's started to get all, well everywhere. It's been 2 or 3 months since Gingerbread was released and I'm pretty sure other devices before the n1 are getting Gingerbread probably sooner. I'm not saying they are stupid or anything, but it's getting a bit out of hand. I think the fragmentation of the two android systems was not the best idea...and why they chose that particular route confuses me. It makes more sense for everyone to go to android 3.0, but run different types. It was said that apps have a tablet and phone mode? why can't the OS do that if the apps can do that? it would make developing a heck of a lot easier if everything was a bit more uniform I think.
    Just me though.
     



    1. Download the Forums for Android™ app!


      Download

       
  2. clutchy

    clutchy Well-Known Member

    another N1 owner here... i thought it would bother me more that gingy hasn't been released for the N1 but i guess i really don't care that much anymore. the phone is functional and does everything i want it to. I'm not entirely convinced gingerbread would offer me anything that i don't already have.

    what i do find absurd is that motorola is allegedly trying to push out the xoom for $800... it's one thing to have great hardware but if you didn't have to invest any money in the OS and it's only a piece of hardware you better price it a little better.

    also everyone who's on a contract is ruining mobile for everyone else.
     
  3. dylo22

    dylo22 Android Enthusiast

    Probably because there are class libraries in honeycomb that are specifically made for tablets and are not used on phones. There is no point in bloating the OS with code that a phone implementation will never use. I dont think it makes development easier. If you want your app to display/behave differently on tablet, then either way, you still have to write code to accommodate both.
     
  4. Martimus

    Martimus One bite at a time...

    Is Motorola any worse than Samsung who initially tried selling the Galaxy tab for big bucks? Even if they start selling it high they'll eventually drop the price when they see that they're not selling as many as they had hoped...
     
  5. Guamguy

    Guamguy Android Expert

    I think the need to upgrade the OS constantly is overrated. Why do you need to upgrade if you already have a very stable OS version? Owning a Nexus S, in my experience, Gingerbread has bleeding edge glitches sometimes which makes me think its not ready for vast worldwide mass consumption. I would say Android 2.2 is the most stable Android OS right now. In terms of API differences, Android 2.2 and 2.3 are almost the same. There isn't that kind of gap that exists between 2.1 and 2.3. Fragmentation only matters if there are API differences that prevents apps from running one or the other. In the case of Android 2.2 and 2.3, its virtually nil in terms of app or API fragmentation. Its true that in many places, 2.3 is more responsive and fast but it also has its share of glitches. Google needs to get it done before it starts spreading Gingerbread to other devices.

    Sometimes, the adage that don't change if it ain't broke applies.

    As for a tablet and smartphone, the fragmentation is unavoidable there because the vast difference in format. What you do for the tablet apps, is to make it easy to convert smartphone apps to tablets apps by for example, just by adding certain declarations to the cost and letting the OS scale the display. That's what Google did and it was logical.

    The idea to using ChromeOS instead for the tablet space is a much more dubious idea. Google did the right thing scaling the much more proven Android to tablets rather than using ChromeOS.
     
  6. takeshi

    takeshi Android Expert

    Because newer is always better. At least, that's what consumers apparently have been conditioned to think
     
  7. dylo22

    dylo22 Android Enthusiast

    Well, it's important to upgrade OS/app to the latest verison if there are security issues that needs to be remedied. Unlike windows, android doesn't have a way to distribute and install patches. So any fixes to security holes will require a new OS. I'm not saying Froyo is full of security holes, but security is one good reason to keep your software up to date.
     
  8. Drhyde

    Drhyde Android Enthusiast

    In agreement with Guamguy here, Google has pretty much acknowledged the random reboot problem is a part of Gingerbread. They initially stated that it was Samsung's hardware, but finally were able to replicate it (whatever that means, sounds like they already knew what they screwed up). With a major issue like this, I wouldn't want to get an upgrade to 2.3 until Google has ironed out the glitches. I'm going to get a Nexus S and bear the risk, but hopefully Google will get it fixed.

    If you don't have Gingerbread yet on the Nexus One (because you were rooted) just wait a little longer. Better to have a fully functional version than a glitchy one. I've played around with CyanogenMod 7 based on Gingerbread and even they don't have it ready yet, so I'm sticking with Froyo until things are ironed out.
     
  9. Guamguy

    Guamguy Android Expert

    I got glitches on Gingerbread. Using Firefox would cause it at times to freeze. I also had problems with one of the wallpapers, the microbe one which causes the homescreen to do a partial freeze. Meaning the homescreen won't swipe, but you can activate the notification bar, application menu, apps, widgets on the screen, the buttons and so on. Then the reboot on calls thing which recently has been corrected. Changing the live wallpaper solved my other problem and removing Firefox solved the first. But still none of this would happen on Froyo.

    I also have an iPod Touch. I can update freely, yes, but I don't. In fact, I wait for months observing a new update before I jump in myself. Only this month I decided to update to iOS 4.2, even though that was out since last November. Most iOS updates add very little enticing new features anyway and are mostly bug and security fixes (usually created from the last update), but sometimes add new ones on their own.

    There is a reason why IT departments hate upgrades, and basically, a carrier is one giant IT department.
     
  10. EarlyMon

    EarlyMon The PearlyMon
    VIP Member

    It's been less than two months.

    Whether anything else will get it before the Nexus One remains to be seen.

    And there's nothing wrong with expecting working updates. These aren't feature phones and therefore there's no reason to be stuck with what came out of the box.

    http://androidforums.com/android-lounge/253067-how-aware-you.html#post2107377
     
Loading...
Similar Threads - Google really has
  1. AdiA
    Replies:
    2
    Views:
    193
  2. AdiA
    Replies:
    7
    Views:
    263
  3. AdiA
    Replies:
    7
    Views:
    254
  4. galapogos
    Replies:
    2
    Views:
    301
  5. rogerbid
    Replies:
    4
    Views:
    417
  6. 99shadows
    Replies:
    2
    Views:
    391
  7. Sunny Rio
    Replies:
    22
    Views:
    693
  8. joshkrupinsky
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    371
  9. jcbhydro
    Replies:
    6
    Views:
    803
  10. Hadron
    Replies:
    6
    Views:
    2,595

Share This Page

Loading...