1. Download our Official Android App: Forums for Android!

How much would you.......?

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by breadnatty08, Apr 6, 2013.

  1. ParishL31

    ParishL31 Android Enthusiast
    Rank:
    None
    Points:
    68
    Posts:
    409
    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2010

    Oct 15, 2010
    409
    106
    68
    Student
    Colorado
    I may be somewhat of a pessimist, but it seems to me finding a job where you're just having a blast and tons of fun is extremely rare. A "good" job to me is one where I'm engaged, interested, days go by quickly, and I'm not absolutely hating my life when I go home each day. Of course there will be the occasional frustrating day, but if it's fairly rare then you're in good shape.

    I mean at the end of the day, it is a job and you are getting paid for it because you wouldn't be doing it on your own just for fun.

    There are some people in the rare case that have a blast a majority of time at work and get paid for it, kudos to them. But expecting that is pretty unrealistic IMO. As long as you aren't absolutely miserable going to and leaving work everyday. A big thing for me is as long as I have a sense of accomplishment is what's big for me. Again, it is work at the end of the day. They are paying me because I wouldn't be there on my own just to have fun. But if I get that gratification that I did something good that day, it makes it much better.

    But to the OP's question. I would take a pay cut to be able to leave the type of job where I'm miserable day in and day out. How much, it would really depend on how strapped for cash I was in the position. But I would much rather take a decent pay cut, not hate my life, and work on adjusting my lifestyle to allow for a lower paying job that doesn't make me miserable.

    However, you mentioned one thing that is extremely important. Benefits. I would not take a "pay cut" that eliminated health insurance and other things that I feel are necessities. I'd rather be dreading going into work versus physically "dying" because I can't afford medication because my "happy" job doesn't offer health insurance and I happen to get sick.
     

    Advertisement

    breadnatty08 likes this.
  2. jmar

    jmar Nexican
    Rank:
    None
    Points:
    523
    Posts:
    4,850
    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2010

    Sep 27, 2010
    4,850
    3,131
    523
    Male
    Sales
    San Jose, CA
    My 2
     
    breadnatty08 and huh like this.
  3. Speed Daemon

    Speed Daemon Android Expert
    Rank:
    None
    Points:
    213
    Posts:
    2,033
    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2012

    Jul 12, 2012
    2,033
    563
    213
    I can't answer that question because I've never had a money-grubbing job in my entire life. I've worked to subsist (with many unpleasant jobs), and I've tried to work on jobs that I liked to do and/or were for the greater good. Most of my jobs have been "dot-org" or "dot-edu" type jobs, working for educational, religious and/or non-profit medical employers. I've never made much money that way.

    I've had three main careers, and I haven't made a substantial amount of money out of any of them. If I had it to do over again, would I go straight into business school and devote my life to essentially wearing suits and backstabbing for big money? No, I would not. That's not the kind of person I am.

    I think I should point out that I didn't try to get paid for playing. The work that I enjoy is productive work that does serve a purpose for many people other than me. There's no "professional sunbather" on my resume! My point is that things that you may do as an avocation aren't necessarily things that you can expect to earn a living from.

    One thing you might consider doing is to change your focus in what you want, and to what others need. IJS
     
    jmar likes this.
  4. huh

    huh Android Expert
    Rank:
     #50
    Points:
    443
    Posts:
    4,708
    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2012

    Oct 10, 2012
    4,708
    2,809
    443
    Female
    Life
    in total denial
    ever thought of giving it a go on your own? Dreads Breads kind of has a ring to it ..doesn't it!:)
     
    jmar likes this.
  5. breadnatty08

    breadnatty08 pain rustique
    Thread Starter
    Rank:
    None
    Points:
    1,413
    Posts:
    19,889
    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2009

    Nov 8, 2009
    19,889
    6,121
    1,413
    District of Columbia
    Yep, thinking about it every day. :)
    I'll get it figured out at some point and make the dream come true.
     
    jmar likes this.
  6. MoodyBlues

    MoodyBlues Choose compassion over cruelty
    VIP Member
    Rank:
     #24
    Points:
    1,013
    Posts:
    6,299
    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2011

    Jan 27, 2011
    6,299
    5,078
    1,013
    Formerly Linux sysadmin/programmer
    $HOME/LosAngeles
    I don't know, as I loved both of my post-college jobs. :D

    Can you get health insurance coverage through your wife's job? TRUST ME on this, you do not want to be without health insurance! (Ponder this: the bills for my brain tumor removal came to ~$250,000.)

    Would you consider delaying this job change for a year? That way you could sock away more money toward your goal of buying a house, THEN make the switch to the lower paying, more fulfilling job.
     
  7. jhtalisman

    jhtalisman Android Enthusiast
    Rank:
     #110
    Points:
    128
    Posts:
    495
    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2011

    Sep 6, 2011
    495
    411
    128
    Male
    Lead Machine Operator
    Nashvegas, Tn
    Do want you love and love what you do.

    I love my job. It is a challenge eveyday, though I make material that babies just piss and poop in, because my children wear that material everday. It's keeping my children from being in an inferior diaper, and also keeping my family with a roof over their head and food in thier bellies.

    Family comes first before money, if the money is needed from your current job to support your family than you can ill-afford to leave. If it is disposable income and your wife enjoys her career then by all means do it.
     
  8. DaSchmarotzer

    DaSchmarotzer Blame it on me
    Rank:
    None
    Points:
    313
    Posts:
    3,086
    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2010

    Mar 10, 2010
    3,086
    1,569
    313
    Studying
    Qu
    "Find something you like to do and then find someone that will pay you to do it."

    I'd rather enjoy my job and get less money. On the other hand, I've only had shitty jobs and I'm still a student with a somewhat limited financial responsibility.
     
  9. SiempreTuna

    SiempreTuna Android Expert
    Rank:
    None
    Points:
    423
    Posts:
    3,889
    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2013

    Jan 11, 2013
    3,889
    1,051
    423
    Wow! I never knew there were so many people livin' the dream! I've always thought that if work were fun, they'd charge you to do it ;)

    It's not that I particularly dislike what I do for work, but if they weren't paying me, I can promise you I would not be doing it ;)

    Have to agree that no-one ever lay on their deathbed wishing they'd spent more time in the office - I'm just not sure that all career changes end up giving you more time off, though.

    Having been through running a business and knowing just how demanding that is (forget time with the family or vacations .. or getting paid regularly when you have a payroll to meet), my own relatively happy medium has been to do something which I may not love, but I don't mind and that pays reasonably well, but doesn't infringe too much on life outside.

    My partner, on the other hand, made a switch from something she enjoyed but that paid peanuts to a path that has led to an empowering and ridiculously well paid job .. that has taken over her life almost entirely. She works at least 12 hours a day - often including on her days 'off' - and even on the rare occassions she has time to do other things, she's often too exhausted to manage. Frankly, I'd much rather she let this particular dream go and move to something a lot less demanding, if a lot more poorly paid. It's not like we need the money.

    Re the OP, it sounds to me like you're a year away from crunch time: unless your partner is making a lot of money, buying a house and following your dream could be mutually incompatible - owning a house is not cheap and also (assuming you're not buying outright) is not really compatible with the uncertain / irregular income of starting a new career.
     

Share This Page

Loading...