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Support HTC One X MAX Charge mAh Intake

Discussion in 'Android Devices' started by LondonVirus, Apr 28, 2012.

  1. LondonVirus

    LondonVirus Newbie
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    Hi guys,

    I am new to this site, came across it on Google. I am also new to Android, have been a Nokia user for well over 6 years, but decided to move away since they started using Windows Mobile...

    Basically I have been looking/searching for some more info in regards to the charging of the phone, I understand all the issue with AC/USB charging, MAX USB output of 500mAh at 5V and all that, 1amp charge = 1000Ma and so on...

    Now I know that the Micro USB port on the phone is 2.0, even though I don't understand why a new device does not have 3.0, and I know that USB 2.0 can transfer 1.5amps alongside data or 5amps MAX

    what I would like to know is what is the HTC ONE X MAX charging intake (if controlled by the phone) when in AC mode, I have seen some USB car charges that can put out 2.1 amps (2100mAh) if not more at 5V, but was wondering if I modify the USB cable/or USB adapter (via the pins bridging way) can the phone make use of more than the basic 700/750mAh I have seen it taking in on the AC at home?

    Thanks
     

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  2. EarlyMon

    EarlyMon The PearlyMon
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    Welcome to the forums! :)

    A power supply can source a given amount of current, but it's up to the phone's charging circuit - including its safety features - to decide on the current that it will actually draw.

    Trying to force current is not likely to get you terribly far. Not a bad idea to stick with the included charger when at home, in my opinion.
     
  3. LondonVirus

    LondonVirus Newbie
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    Yes, but what's the MAX the phone will allow? As there is no point in getting a 2.1 or 3.1 amp charger, if the phone will not allow it...?
     
  4. Paul_59

    Paul_59 Newbie
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    I don't know the maximum, but would expect it to be approximately 1 amp (1000mA).
    Using battery monitor widget on my One X, the maximum current drain (discharge) was 1290mA.

    The maximum current charge was 876mA

    As others have stated the charge circuit will monitor temperature, which will increase as the charge or discharge current does.

    Maximum temperature needs to be kept low, as high temperatures and charging currents will reduce battery capacity and life.

    Battery voltage on charge shouldn't exceed 4.2V, ideally battery temperature below 40c
     
  5. LondonVirus

    LondonVirus Newbie
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    Great info, makes perfect sence, if you can keep the phone cool, you may have higher voltage, I heard someone putting it confront of the air vent in the car...
     
  6. EarlyMon

    EarlyMon The PearlyMon
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    That's the common rule for Li-Ion batteries in general, but does it apply here?

    New battery tech used in last year's HTC Evo 3D raised that to 4.35V, and the Li-Po battery tech in the One X is newer still, so... just asking.

    Many of us do that with older HTC's especially when using GPS.
     
  7. alcohol

    alcohol Well-Known Member
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    This doesn't answer your question but I've used the charger that came with my TouchPad (tablet) to charge my AT&T one x and it definitely charges faster than the HTC one.

    It's 5.4V instead of 5V.
     
  8. Harry2

    Harry2 Android Expert
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    To answer the initial question, the One X's max intake of current when charging "AC" :)

    I measured on the One X's microUSB cable, it's about 930mA.
    It's about the same I measured on my HTC Sensation and Desire at that time :)

    So, simplified said, if a battery app will show me +730mA while charging then the battery will get this 730mA as charging current and the phone's running apps/services will get the remainding 200mA.

    Harry
     
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  9. petfik

    petfik Lurker
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    In my car I have a charger of 700-1000mA max. When charging the phone, I see a standard 750mA (measured by the phone).

    When I run Google navigation, then the phone discharges even when plugged in, so the consumption is over 1A. Note that the temperature is not an issue - I cool it down enough by A/C.

    I wonder what would happen if I had say a 2A charger and the phone would be cooled down so the temp wouldn't exceed ~40C. Would it be able to keep the battery level or even charge, i.e. input current being over 1A?

    Petr.
     
  10. Harry2

    Harry2 Android Expert
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    Black Forest
    I don't know because I've not that problem of discharging while navigation and also I didn'nt look further :)

    You might look for another cable, short as possible and with a wide gauge (24AWG or better).
    See, the electrially resistance of a standard microUSB cable lets a charger's 5V output voltage level drop to a lower level on the phone's connector and lowers also the amperage flow.

    Harry
     
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