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Is there an app that allows you to see notifications on your desktop?

Discussion in 'Android Apps & Games' started by SpartanJ59, Feb 2, 2014.

  1. SpartanJ59

    SpartanJ59 Well-Known Member
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    Well self explanatory, but the notifications show up on your Mac/PC to show when you have an SMS or you have a notification from any other app?
     

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  2. codesplice

    codesplice Elite Recognized Moderator
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    PushBullet makes use of the 4.3+ notification handler to let you selectively "mirror" notifications from your mobile device to your desktop.
     
  3. zoxxo

    zoxxo Android Enthusiast
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    There are several. Mightytext is limited to SMS only and requires Chrome to make it happen. Pushbullet sends all notifications and allows you to dismiss the notifications that are on your phone from your desktop.

    I've been using Mightytext for a while, but it's become rather annoying with a reoccurring battery charge notification that can't be disabled. I've recently started using Pushbullet and I've really been quite impressed.

    There may be more, but these are two that I'm most familiar with because I've used them...
     
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  4. droid151

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  5. codesplice

    codesplice Elite Recognized Moderator
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    I just stumbled across another app that lets you access a "Virtual Smartphone" version of your device to send/receive SMS, calls, and contacts from your PC or web browser. It's currently in beta so it may be buggy, but it looks like an interesting enough concept (and it's free!)that I will probably try it out: PPLCONNECT.
     
  6. lexluthor

    lexluthor Android Expert
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    What? Mightytext is a great app with virtually the same play store rating as pushbullet.

    But, Mightytext does only do texting.
     
  7. electricpete

    electricpete Android Expert
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    It seems there are some unique security concerns for these types of apps. If an app can read your sms, it has one of two items needed for dual verification. If you give push bullet the permission it requires ob pc, it can read your web activity including password (the other half of dual verification). So installing just this one app gives someone everything they need to hack your double verification gmail account. At least that's what it seems to me. I would love for someone to convince me I'm wrong...because I'd love to install that app if it's safe
     
  8. codesplice

    codesplice Elite Recognized Moderator
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    https://www.pushbullet.com/security

    PB never gets access to your Google password. It authenticates to your Google account using the token that already exists on your device.
     
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  9. electricpete

    electricpete Android Expert
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    Thanks. When I install chrome pushbullet extension on my pc, it tells me that it can
    “access your data on all websites”
    “access your tabs and browsing activity”

    I believe that means it can access passwords typed into the browser (on any page) after the extension is installed. Since google periodically confirms passwords, it’s just a matter of time until my google password is typed into chrome.
    web browser - Worst case scenario, what can a Chrome extension do with "Your data on all websites" and "Your tabs and browsing activity"? - Information Security Stack Exchange
     
  10. codesplice

    codesplice Elite Recognized Moderator
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    Worst case, yes, it could be maliciously stealing your data - but PushBullet does legitimately need those permissions in order to be useful. It really comes down to how much you can trust a service like this - the same goes for any online service. Android Forums could sell the email address that you registered with to spammers; you trust them not to do so. Google could sell the contents of your inbox to the highest bidder; you trust them not to do so. PushBullet could collect my passwords and compromise my accounts; I trust them not to do so.

    It's okay (and healthy!) to have a certain amount of skepticism and concern over how your personal information is used online, and it's also okay to opt for the risk-free path of not using a service instead of taking advantage of the convenience that it may offer. It's a trade-off, and we each get to choose our own decision about how to proceed. To that end, thank you for raising these security concerns - it's important that we are able to make an informed decision based on what the risks actually are. :thumbup:

    (BTW, touching back on the 2-factor authentication concerns you mentioned in an earlier post: I use the Authenticator app on my phone (and one on my watch) to generate the codes; they never arrive via SMS, so even if PB did know my Google password, they would still never be able to actually access my account.)
     
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