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General Juice Defender, Push Email and Battery

Discussion in 'Android Devices' started by 13neo, Jul 26, 2011.

  1. 13neo

    13neo Newbie
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    So far having read on juice defender (and other similar apps), I understand that JD simply switches data connection off for a specific period of time. And this is one of the ways how the app is able to save battery.

    Is there a way or an app that would allow to have push notification and save battery?

    Thanks.
     

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  2. lunatic59

    lunatic59 Moderati ergo sum
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    There are a couple of general things you can do to increase battery life. First I would look at widgets that use data, like news feeds and weather widgets. Cut back on the frequency of the polling. Many times they are set to every 5 minutes by default or even every minute. That can really suck juice fro a battery. Similarly, if you have any POP or IMAP email accounts, reduce the number of times they poll the servers, or if email needs to be immediate, forward your other email accounts to gmail, which is a push service.

    Cut back on screen brightness. Many use the lowest setting but auto works fine for me. And, turn off Wifi, Bluetooth and GPS antennas when not in use.

    Finally, especially when the phone is new, it's advisable to perform a deep power cycle.

    Let your phone discharge completely, keep it on until you are warned about low battery and then just let it run out. Most phone will shut down automatically around 5%.

    Plug the phone into the original a/c charger, not the usb cable. Let it charge to full uninterrupted.

    When the phone says full, unplug the phone from the charge and reboot. Once the phone is completely restarted, plug it back into the charger and shut the phone off. Even if it says fully charged, let it charge for at least one more hour.

    Unplug the charger and reboot the phone one more time. Now you should start seeing (possibly significantly) longer charge times.

    Modern Li-Ion batteries do not have a memory and do not need to be conditioned, but Android needs to be taught exactly what a full charge represents so that it can manage power appropriately. Without a deep power cycle, it doesn't know the true capacity of the battery.

    Be advised that you should only need to do this once as regularly deep cycling the battery can harm it. Li-Ion batteries perform better and last longer with incremental charges.

    Hope these suggestions help you out.
     
  3. 13neo

    13neo Newbie
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    Thanks, I had taken care of the widgets and the brightness but still observed a huge battery drain. I will try the deep power cycle.

    Maybe my expectation for battery power is high (I switched from blackberry and with similar use had battery last for almost 2 days!). So with push notification enabled for Exchange, GMail, GTalk etc., an hour of facebook, twitter, internet and music and of course some calls and messaging, how long should my battery normally last on SG2?
     

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