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Support Knox and RAM problems.

Discussion in 'Android Devices' started by DirtyRussRuss, Jan 7, 2014.

  1. DirtyRussRuss

    DirtyRussRuss Lurker
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    Most of the time, my RAM usage is very high. I keep track of my RAM usage via Clean Master (app). It says there's a file called "com.Sec.Knox.containeragent" that's taking up 150MB of RAM! I would desperately love to know how to get it off my Note 3 for good. Every time I try to uninstall it or stop it from running, but it says "the policy won't allow me" or something along those lines. I've been trying to delete all remnants of Knox off of my phone. I'd like to know if there's anyone that's tech savvy enough to let me Knox how to get past this "policy". Please don't anyone tell me it can't be done. There has to be a way.
     

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  2. dynomot

    dynomot Android Expert
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    Hello and welcome. :)

    Donot worry about RAM. Most people who come from Windows especially think that high RAM usage is a bad thing. You have to unlearn everything you think you know. The adage "Unused RAM is wasted RAM" is a good place to start from. Here is a link explaining why :

    RAM: What it is, how it's used, and why you shouldn't care | Android Central

    The thing that is using 150Mb of RAM is KNOX. It is Samsung's secure Enterprise solution for business, the military and above. Ignore it, you will only use it for work of your company has a BYOD (Bring Your Own Device) regime. If you want to "Root" your device then it becomes an annoyance rather than anything else. Senior member (and all round good egg) Ironass has written extensively about Knox start here of you really want to know about it :

    http://androidforums.com/samsung-galaxy-s4/788644-knox-security-locked-bootloader-new-firmwares.html
     
  3. DirtyRussRuss

    DirtyRussRuss Lurker
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    Thanks for the info. And I had another problem that may be related. I think I may have deleted some bloatware I shouldn't have. (my device is rooted). I get an error message every 20 minutes about that says "unfortunately, calendars have stopped working". What could have went wrong and how can I fix that?
     
  4. dynomot

    dynomot Android Expert
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    It could be one of two things. If your still rooted "stock" firmware (ie your not running a custom ROM, your just rooted) more than likely you've deleted something that it depends on by accident. In that case it would be hard to find out exactly what and a reflash and reroot (and sorry, yes a rebuild of how you like your phone) is probably the only way back. For future reference use Titanium Backup to "freeze" unwanted apps and bloatware and if freezing it causes problems "unfreeze" it, much safer and easy to restore. Titanium Backup is a very useful "Root only" app that can be found in Play Store.

    The other thing it could be is a custom ROM with bugs, but that would be slightly unusual.
     
  5. DirtyRussRuss

    DirtyRussRuss Lurker
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    So am I going to have to restore my phone?
     
  6. BlueBiker

    BlueBiker Android Expert
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    Things not to try until you know what you're doing: Firearms, chainsaws, and rooting Android phones. :rolleyes:
     
  7. Rxpert83

    Rxpert83 Dr. Feelgood
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    If you know what things you uninstalled, people can provide you with the apk to reinstall it as a system app

    Or you could pull it out of the stock ROM

    Or reflash the stock ROM without wiping data

    I don't have a Knox enabled device, so make sure its OK to do on your device (via our knowledgeable members here) before proceeding with anything
     
  8. Bodycount

    Bodycount Android Enthusiast
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    Knox is also there for warranty issues. If the trigger is tripped then Samsung won't honor warranty returns. It trips when you root (using an old method) or you change system files. Currently there is no known way to revert it back so once it's tripped you're screwed.

    1x1 flag means it's good
    1x0 flag means it's tripped.
     
  9. dynomot

    dynomot Android Expert
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    Sorry your post is incorrect, apart from no resetting the Knox flag.

    0x0 means it's good

    0x1 means it's tripped.

    These are the only two states. The Knox flag status can be seen from Download mode (Volume down + home Key + Power, all held together, power key last to be pressed until the "warning screen" and some info about the risks of installing a custom OS. Then the up Key. The Knox and other statuses are in the top left corner to return to normal from this screen: long press power to reboot as normal)

    Samsung may well honour warranty repairs on a Knox tripped device, they may not as well, it is a grey area. Here in the UK along with the rest of the European Union we get a manufacture 2 year warranty on all consumer electronics. Technically it is illegal in the EU to deny a warranty repair for altering software on a device, provided altering the software hasn't damaged it (over clocking and frying the CPU for instance, obviously would not be covered), however "technically" isn't actually. There is anecdotal evidence that a "Knox tripped" device has gotten a warranty repair, usually for something totally unrelated like a faulty hardware button, but still warranties have been honoured.

    The "Knox warranty void: 0x1" status is not the device warranty but the security warranty provided by Samsung with Knox. It can never be reset, ever, as it has "blown" an eFuse. The Knox flag reads the efuse status (in essence a singular bit on a chip, it's two states 0 or 1. 1 is tripped 0 is OK, it is tripped when the bootloader is compromised by either rooting (not always, see "Root De La Vega"), or installing a custom recovery (always tripped).

    See Here, for so far, the only official word on Knox :

    https://www.samsungknox.com/en/blog...ox-enabled-devices-and-knox-warranty-void-bit
     
  10. Bodycount

    Bodycount Android Enthusiast
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    Sorry I got the 0x0 and 0x1 part wrong. And the warranty part I was going by many websites saying Samsung will not honor it if it's tripped. I don't live in the UK so I don't know what your laws are like.
     
  11. Rxpert83

    Rxpert83 Dr. Feelgood
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    In the US, many consumers either have insurance or a carrier warranty on a device, neither of which should he affected by a Knox trip
     
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  12. Rukbat

    Rukbat Android Expert
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    According to the Magnuson–Moss Warranty Act (the only thing that matters in the law is the law - it doesn't concern itself with company policy), any part of the written warranty which is ambiguous is construed AGAINST the drafter of the warranty (Samsung, in this case). And if you read page 32 of the book that comes with the phone, it's TOTALLY ambiguous about rooting and flashing ROMs, since it's more than unreasonable to consider software not supplied by Samsung to void the warranty. (It would violate the "tie-in" provision of MMWA, much as requiring oil changes in cars to void the warranty if not done by the dealer.)

    Of course all this is moot until someone takes it to the SCOTUS and dares them to invalidate MMWA. No law is automatically followed by the vendor if the vendor doesn't want to - until a court orders them to.

    Just like stores can sell plastic file boxes and fireproof file safes, cellphone manufacturers should sell bootlocked, secure, BYOD phones, and rootable, flashable phones, and you should be able to walk into a carrier's store and buy the one of your choice. Then it's between you and your employer whether you can store company emails on your phone.

    (And the whole matter is so ludicrous since a glaring security hole was found in Knox, making it useless for the purpose for which it was intended. I hope some large company sues Samsung for warranty of mechantability violation.)
     
  13. dynomot

    dynomot Android Expert
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    And there in lies the problem. If you root your phone and the very next day the home key falls off and you are denied a warranty repair because you rooted, apart from getting annoyed, stamping your feet and not getting anywhere, what can you do?

    In the UK we can complain to trading standards, but probably will not get anywhere. Is an individual likely to sue Samsung? Of course not.

    I can't entirely agree with Rubkat, with his oil in car analogy. What if you rooted, overclocked and fried your CPU? Surely then Samsung would be able to deny a warranty repair? Yes they would have to prove you O/clocked (which I doubt they could) but you get my drift. A better analogy would be putting the wrong kind of oil in a car and trying to claim warranty when the engine goes bang. No car manufacturer would repair it under warranty then.

    Yes there should be two types of the same phone model. Identical in every way, but one you can root, flash and do what you like with, the other locked up tight. The problem there is what sort of warranty would a manufacturer offer on a phone you could destroy by putting dodgy code on or frying your CPU. No warranty (in the EU at least) is legally not an option. Consumer protection has thrown a spanner in the works, an unintended consequence of legal consumer protection.

    Since this affects very few consumers, nothing will change and rooting /modifying any device with software will always be a 'grey area' warranty wise.
     
  14. Mikestony

    Mikestony ~30% Carbon Black ±
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    :eek: Aw, c'mon, I like to live on the edge :p :D LOL;) j/k

    @op, looks like some good advice here, and I agree with dyno about the ram thing...no need to worry about that:)
     
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  15. Gomjaba

    Gomjaba Android Enthusiast
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    Unused RAM is wasted RAM . In the Android world anyway .

    ;)
     

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The Samsung Galaxy Note 3 launched in 2012 and was the company's flagship phablet. The device featured a 5.7-inch display with a 1920 x 1080 resolution, 3GB of RAM, 32GB of storage, and a 13MP main camera.

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