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Mechanical

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by OfTheDamned, Jan 13, 2012.

  1. OfTheDamned

    OfTheDamned The Friendly Undead
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  2. Frisco

    Frisco =Luceat Lux Vestra=
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    Very beautiful.

    I can see twospirits wearing one on each hip now.


    :D
     
  3. EarlyMon

    EarlyMon The PearlyMon
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  4. Bob Maxey

    Bob Maxey Android Expert
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    Actually, they are amazing. I own a Curta.

    Take a look at a "run of the mill" Marchant calculator. Countless levers, cogs, wheels, springs and fiddle faddles all working to compute 34 times 123. If you want one repaired, I am your guy. I cut my teeth on Marchants.
     
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  5. EarlyMon

    EarlyMon The PearlyMon
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    Cool! :) I was wondering who else has played with a Curta but hats off for owning one.

    Looking up some of the Soviet wonders...
     
  6. Frisco

    Frisco =Luceat Lux Vestra=
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    Are parts being manufactured for those? Or is it a scavenger hunt every time you want to fix one?
     
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  8. Bob Maxey

    Bob Maxey Android Expert
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    My father worked for Marchant Calculators and he collected lots of interesting stuff. Somewhere I have a few 1K (perhaps 2, 3, or 4 4K) Toshiba Core Memory Boards. Very cool looking and as I recall, costly at the time.

    The little ferrite donuts interconnected with wire.

    We sometime forget just what can be done with mechanical systems.
     
  9. EarlyMon

    EarlyMon The PearlyMon
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    Loved my DigiComp, got it when they came out.

    Digi-Comp I - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    An uncompromising, unbridled ALU with a massive 3 bit resolution!

    Picture -

    [​IMG]

    Yes, the slide lever said CLOCK. No, mine went over a decade without gathering the dust shown in that picture.
     
  10. El Presidente

    El Presidente Beware The Milky Pirate!
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  11. EarlyMon

    EarlyMon The PearlyMon
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  12. SUroot

    SUroot Android Expert
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    A snapshot for a passion of mine then...

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
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  13. OfTheDamned

    OfTheDamned The Friendly Undead
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    I am a huge watch buff. Mechanical is the only way to go, IMHO.
     
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  14. SUroot

    SUroot Android Expert
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    I agree, although I have an immensely sleek Swiss Quartz which is beautiful in every single way, I am gutted it is not mechanical

    My fianc
     
  15. Frisco

    Frisco =Luceat Lux Vestra=
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    The photography alone is worth the price of admission. :)
     
  16. OfTheDamned

    OfTheDamned The Friendly Undead
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    I became a huge fan of manual movements when I first learned about Panerai. While I have a few automatics, nothing beats the feel of winding up a watch yourself.
     
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  17. SUroot

    SUroot Android Expert
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    I just like mechanical. The craftmanship and skill that goes into an automatic mechanical movement is far more impressive to me than a manual wind. Using gravity to keep time the movement wound amazing.

    That said, using a vibrating frequency by passing electricity through quartz is similarly amazing.


    I do have a nice 1969 manual wind Omega deville which is stunningly elegant and I love it, but automatic mechanical watches certainly impress me more from an engineering perspective
     
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  18. Bob Maxey

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  19. Bob Maxey

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  20. Bob Maxey

    Bob Maxey Android Expert
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    My pack rat father brought home a garage full of parts. Thousands of tiny boxes filled with screws and springs, reels, motors, covers, internal levers and cams and cogs and frames and every part in between. They sat in my grandmothers garage for several decades until we tossed them. This was pre-Internet.

    Apparently, the parts are scarce and there is a collector market for them.

    The parts are truly odd as are the tools. Some internal parts look like tools. If you ever get a chance to look inside, do it. You will appreciate just how hard they were to fix as well as the engineering required to get hundreds of parts to move together in order to compute to 20 decimal places.

    Also, if you did not keep your fingers out of the moving parts, you could no longer play the banjo. No BS, the machine could cut off a finger. Huge amounts of torque.

    We had one of these: SCM Marchant Cogito 240SR Calculator

    I only remember this general kind of Marchant: File:Figurematic-10SDX.jpg - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Note how many decimal places it will calculate.

    I recall being told by a programmer at work how the old guys probably can't learn how to program and all they know are calculators like the one above; as though we cant learn to program because we are not geared for this modern world. I can well imagine that programmer not at all being able to sit down and design a machine like a Figurematic. I'll learn programming long before he learns to make a Matrchant.
     
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  21. SUroot

    SUroot Android Expert
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  22. Frisco

    Frisco =Luceat Lux Vestra=
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    Indeed. ;)

    That put me in mind of my dad coming to me when I was 13 with his railroad watch. He wanted to teach me how to take it apart and then put it back together in working order, he said. He had the tools and a special bench in a curtained area of the garage loft where he liked to repair friends and co-workers watches and clocks.

    I remember it well; it was a Waltham-Ball. We walked up to the loft and he was jabbering about the procedure. I was scared to death I'd mess it up, but he told me that was "impossible unless you lose something."

    Well, he did everything from step one of dismantling it to reassembling it. And I was ok with it because he wanted to teach me what he knew, not how to actually do it. :D
     
  23. Gandalf7

    Gandalf7 Well-Known Member
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    Thanks to all for the contributions. I really enjoyed scanning this thread! The watch discussion reminded me of my grandfather's pocket watch, given to me some years ago after he passed. Pulling it out now, I see that is an Elgin, nothing elaborate but significant to me for sentimental reasons.

    In looking up Elgin watches, I ran across a web page that watch buffs might enjoy--it reproduces an article from the July 1869 issue of Harper's New Monthly Magazine. The author was able to visit the Elgin plant and describes how those watches were manufactured. For example, as to the screws, the author writes, "Here are machines which will cut screws with five hundred threads to the inch; the finest used in the watch have two hundred and fifty. Even these threads are invisible to the naked eye, and it takes one hundred and forty-four thousand of the screws to weigh a pound." Amazing!
     
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  24. SUroot

    SUroot Android Expert
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    Yes amazing indeed. Watch making then is the equivalent of the nano-tech of today. Let's call it nano-mech ;)
     
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  25. OfTheDamned

    OfTheDamned The Friendly Undead
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    Watch making is a true art form. Think of all the RnD that goes into building something like this and how much harder it was before computers, machine shops and 3D graphic models could be created. The precision, the labor and the time (no pun intended) it would take to create one of these beautiful pieces of precision art just 40 years ago is mind boggling. Even with this new technology it shows to be a real process to put out a single watch.

    Breguet - Making of @ Marie Antoinette Grande Complication Pocket Watch - YouTube






     
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