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Support Poor battery life - LG G3

Discussion in 'Android Devices' started by nateball2481, Dec 11, 2014.

  1. nateball2481

    nateball2481 Lurker
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    I just bought an LG-G3 less than a week ago, and the battery life is completely terrible. This sucks, because otherwise, I completely love the phone. I've disable all the bloatware that came preinstalled on the phone, but when I check the apps that are running in the background, there are certain things that are always running - like google play services, e-mail, voice mail, and message+.

    I know that the G3 screen eats a lot of battery, but I find it hard to believe that this phone is eating through this much battery right out of the box directly in front of my face. Like, I open chrome, and it goes from 100% to 86% in less than 3 or 4 minutes. Is that what smart phones are today? Are there any background apps that are seriously draining this much power that I don't know about?
     

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  2. hilmar2k

    hilmar2k Android Expert
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    Something is amiss. I am off charger every day for about 15 hours, and always have over 60% remaining when it goes back on the charger. Now I don't game, or watch much video, but I use my phone throughout the day for email, browsing, texts, etc.

    First thing to do is restart. I have noticed that sometimes things get stuck running in the background and restarting solves that. Don't worry too much about stuff running, though. Android will manage that for you. Consonantly shutting them down often does more harm than good.

    What is your brightness set to? I have mine on auto and 60%, and find that to be more than adequate and certainly helps with battery life.
     
    bolski likes this.
  3. freeperjim

    freeperjim Member
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    I've had my G3 ~ 4 months and love it...including the battery performance.
    Typically, I get > 24 hours on a charge and my use is as follows:
    Brightness: 100%
    Battery Saver: ON
    Main use: web surfing, email & iHeartRadio - especially mornings during fitness club visit

    Because of the stock charger that provides a very fast re-charge, I typically charge first thing in the morning and good to go by the time I walk out the door.

    In contrast, my previous phone was a HTC One+ and I was lucky to get 6 hours - so I'm thrilled with the battery life of my G3.
     
  4. bolski

    bolski Android Enthusiast
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    At one point, I was at 28 hours and still had 50% left, and all of that was NOT on standby. I had played some Game of War, placed and took some phone calls, sent and received various text messages, listened to music in the car on my way home and to do other errands for a total of almost an hour of music listening. Plus, I leave it on all night because I use the phone as my alarm clock as well.

    Battery life on this phone is excellent. I've had other people that I know who have this phone and they complain that when they shoot HD videos, and play their games for an hour or more, the battery life goes down quick. Well, duh. Yeah, it will if all your doing is shooting HD videos and playing games all day. What do you expect? I have to laugh when they complain like that.

    And, as hilmar2k stated, shutting down apps constantly actually causes more battery to be sucked up. Android is NOT a true multi-tasking OS. Yes, it does have services that run in the background, and that's what they are for. They are not interactive with the user and should only be used for certain circumstances, but nothing stops a dev from creating a service that could misbehave.

    Now, to warn you, I'm going on a teaching moment, so you don't have to continue if you don't want to, but I just wanted to go into more detail about how Android handles applications and resources. If you're not interested, then you can stop reading now. But, if you are interested in why task killers could actually be a detriment to battery life, read on.

    The apps you run, known as activities, do NOT continue running in the background when they are no longer in focus. Instead, they go into a suspended state where, depending on what the developer chose to do, stores certain information to allow it to start back up where the user left off. The Android OS then basically shuts it down. As more and more apps come into focus and then leave, they also are saving their "states". If the OS detects that memory is getting low, then it will start actually killing off older processes that are in a suspended state, and it essentially chooses them based on various factors, but one is how old is it, has it accessed any Android services or resources recently, etc. In essence, this is what a task killer does, but instead, it kills the process outright when maybe it doesn't need to be yet.

    Those processes that are killed require longer restart times than those that are suspended and not really doing anything. Suspended does NOT mean it's still running and eating up CPU processes. They are essentially asleep, but not dead (killed).

    However, those suspended apps will start up quicker and not eat up battery life as opposed to those that have been outright killed and have to start up from scratch completely. When an app has to start up from scratch, there are a lot of other things that the Android OS must do to start that app up. Starting an app up from suspended mode skips a lot of those other necessary steps, hence it starts up quicker and doesn't eat up as much battery life doing so. Again, the Android OS will eventually kill off old processes when it needs more resources.

    So, if you are using an app, and then you leave it and kill it, and then come back to it later, you essentially are starting it up from scratch again, which results in more battery life being killed off. However, if you would have left it alone, it might have still been in a suspended mode, hence it would start up quicker and would not chew up battery.

    Now, it might not seem like that should make that much of a difference, but it does. Task killers reduce battery life, especially if you are constantly killing apps off. They might make your phone appear to run snappier, but in the end, you are actually killing your battery life.

    A lot of what is perceived as too many apps running, and makes the phone feel sluggish, is due to poorly programmed apps where people program their apps without taking into account what should happen when their app goes into a suspended mode and they leave various resources open or don't clean up properly when going into suspended mode. Or, they just program it poorly. Yes, you CAN program an app poorly. Take it from me, I've done a number of poorly programmed applications in my early years of programming.

    Programming for android is a LOT different than programming for say, Windows. PCs have so much more resources (memory, storage, etc) than a phone does, so it takes a different mindset when programming for mobile devices. Mobile devices have limited memory, resources, etc. Yes, these days we are getting phones with quad core processors (like the G3), more memory, etc. But, in the end, they are still limited in what can be packed into a hand-held device. So, you have to take that into account when programming. And task killing works fine in Windows. But why do you have to kill it? If programmed properly, you wouldn't need to do that. Same goes for mobile applications. But, task killing under Android is actually a no-no. In the early days, yes. It was a necessary evil. These days, not so much any more. Android has matured a lot since it's early Cupcake days.

    Now, for those that use Greenify, it's not a task killer. It puts the application into a suspended mode. Also, it's not like freezing. Basically, it is preventing an application from performing a wake lock. Again, it doesn't kill the app, it just suspends it. Of course, if resources become low, that app could eventually be killed outright by Android, but at that point, Android is taking care of it and killing the app when it deems necessary. Greenify doesn't kill the app.

    Whew. Went WAY too far into detail and I apologize for that, but sometimes I think that can actually help people out if they don't understand how Android works. It's actually pretty smart how Google wrote Android and how it has matured over the years.
     
    #4 bolski, Dec 14, 2014
    Last edited: Dec 18, 2014
  5. Loqo

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    First question: I bought my LG G3 few days ago, is it normal that battery is draining very quick? Every two or three minutes 1% is draining no matter what I'm doing but literally, only time when battery isn't draining that quick is when my phone is locked and I don't use it. Brightness is 22%!!!

    Second question:
    http://www.ebay.com/itm/New-3500mAh..._Cell_Phone_PDA_Batteries&hash=item5d511b7df7


    http://www.ebay.com/itm/Bateria-BL-..._Cell_Phone_PDA_Batteries&hash=item27f2611059

    Now I want to buy one of those batteries, and my question is, is it going to fit to my LG G3 European version?
     
  6. Unforgiven

    Unforgiven OK Google
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    Duplicate topics merged.:)
     
  7. Jshadow

    Jshadow Newbie
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    I have a D851 with 4.4.2 10r software on T-Mobile.

    You can download GSAM battery monitor or BetterBatteryStats to find out which apps are draining your phone.

    I used Wakelock Detector to find out which wakelocks were draining my battery. I had Google Play Services NlpCollectorWakelock and NlpWakelock along with Phone RILJ wakelock draining my battery somewhat. I use Wakelock Terminator to kill those.

    I get 1% to 2% drain during my 6 hour sleep. I can easily get 2 days (48) hours use from my phone and up to 5 hours screen on time unless I'm constantly using my phone for watching videos or surfing.

    Or, you can remove apps one at a time to find out what is draining your battery. My phone does not get hot when not in use.
     
  8. paulhead

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    You've had the phone a few days and you're ready to buy a new battery for it? How bout doing some research and finding out what you you can do to solve you're problem. I've had my phone a few weeks and have had long battery days and short ones but overall good ones. And all those extra "power saving " battery apps are crap and actually make your phone run worse.
     
  9. JEREMY1

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    Why? New battery instaled
     
  10. Mikestony

    Mikestony ~30% Carbon Black ±
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    Hello Jeremy! Welcome to AF!
    You have a new battery installed and still having issues?
    Please elaborate on what life you are getting:)
     
  11. pagdodd

    pagdodd Well-Known Member
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    I am sure this topic has already been discussed.

    But, how is battery life for everyone?

    I came from a HTC ONE M7 because that phone was not lasting the day.

    With moderate use. I estimate that I can get about 6 hours out of mine.

    I have only had the phone a few days and believe the battery takes a bit of "bedding in" so it may get better.

    According to reviews the G3 should last better than I am finding.

    Or am I just expecting too much?!

    P.S. The poor battery life on my other phone seemed to coincide with getting a LG G Watch R for Xmas.

    Anyone else seen a big decrease in life since having Wear?
     
  12. Muckle Dabuckle

    Muckle Dabuckle Well-Known Member
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    Battery life is amazing on my G3 (moderate user). I unplug at 6 a.m. and when I get home at 5 p.m. I still usually have 50% of my battery left. I surf the Internet, use Facebook and Twitter, check e-mails constantly, etc. Once I plug it in for charging (usually at 10 p.m.) I often times still have 15% battery left after a few phone calls, more Internet surfing, Facebook, and Twitter (possibly a few minutes of gaming and video). So most work days I get around 16 hours off of a charge, at about 3.5 hours screen time.

    If you are only getting 6 hours on moderate usage there is most likely something wrong with the phone, battery, or apps. Unless you meant 6 hours of screen time, in which case there is something wrong with my G3! :D
     
  13. pagdodd

    pagdodd Well-Known Member
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    I will have a look tomorrow regarding my screen time etc.. :)

    I have been charging it on and off throughout the day, for about 30% at a time. As I read that Li-Ion batteries prefer lots of smaller charges than 0% - 100% every time?
     
  14. Muckle Dabuckle

    Muckle Dabuckle Well-Known Member
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    Never heard of that. Wonder what the theory behind that is? I just charge my phone when I get the screen prompt to "charge my phone" at 15%...just because the phone tells me too. LOL

    Anyway...if I were you I'd already have it in the back of my head that the phone may need to be returned. I would do a factory reset (after a few days of letting the battery "bed in" if that doesn't work) and then add one app at a time and see if you can link one of the apps to the battery drain to rule out hardware problems. I did this when I had a crackling noise in the earpiece of my first G3. It was still present after the factory reset so I knew it wasn't any of the apps I added causing it. Returned it for a new one that has worked great for a month now.
     
    #14 Muckle Dabuckle, Mar 16, 2015
    Last edited: Mar 16, 2015
  15. pagdodd

    pagdodd Well-Known Member
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    This was my source...

    1. Several partial charges are better than a full one
    Well, just like in real life, several sprint sessions are better than a marathon. Lithium-ion batteries appreciate partial charging, for example from 30% to 60% or from 45% to 79%, as this keeps the battery's cells close to their ideal state for longer. This means that you have no excuse not to charge your phone several times a day if you can do so.

    http://www.phonearena.com/news/How-...phones-li-ion-battery-the-correct-way_id67159
     
    Muckle Dabuckle likes this.
  16. lunatic59

    lunatic59 Moderati ergo sum
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    Unlike the older NiMH batteries, Lithium Ion batteries do not develop a memory, so they won't suffer from more frequent charges nor do they need to be conditioned with deep discharges. More importantly, if a Li-Ion battery completely discharges it, it can be rendered inert and will not charge from that point on.
     
  17. Mikestony

    Mikestony ~30% Carbon Black ±
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    Merged similar battery life threads :D
     
  18. KenjiSpencer

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  19. expresiva

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    I"m suddenly frustrated as well. Up until a few days ago, I wasn't that unhappy with my battery. But for the past 2 nights, I've gone to bed with between a 50-60% charge, and it's completely dead by the time that I wake up. Keep in mind that I rarely sleep over 5 hours. So it's draining in less than 5 hours with zero use. :(
     
  20. Muckle Dabuckle

    Muckle Dabuckle Well-Known Member
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    Definitely sounds like something wrong with your phone and/or battery. I generally lose only 1-2% overnight when not using the phone (7-8 hours). Is your screen possibly staying on during this time?
     
    #20 Muckle Dabuckle, Mar 19, 2015
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2015
  21. expresiva

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    Why would a battery suddenly go bad?
     
  22. edgie70

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    So far I'm on 45 hours of battery at light to medium usage , checking Facebook , messages , the odd phone call ... QuickMemo+_2015-04-01-21-58-28.png
     
  23. Primevyl

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    If one of the cells in the battery gets swollen (though admittedly this is more of a chronic issue) then the charge capacity can be impaired. Discharging can even be affected.
     
  24. Primevyl

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    To check for battery swells remove your battery place on a flat surface and see if it spins...overcharging is normally the culprit. When it is fully charged take it off the charger. If you can't do that, well buy new batteries
     
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  25. jetdoc3037

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    Just my opinion, I like this phone so far and have added some apps to help with my battery draw, like Clean Master, etc...but I tell you, I had a LG Vista and that battery lasted for days, with heavy use. I know the screen is why but I do miss my old Vista sometimes.
     
    #25 jetdoc3037, Apr 14, 2015
    Last edited: Apr 14, 2015

LG G3

The LG G3 was the 2014 flagship device for LG, and was one of the first smartphones on the market with a 5.5-inch 2560 x 1440 display. It featured a Snapdragon 801 processor, 2GB or 3GB of RAM, 16GB or 32GB of internal storage, a microSD card slot, and a 13MP.
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