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QR Codes and other symbology

Discussion in 'Android Lounge' started by AnonGuy, Sep 25, 2014.

  1. AnonGuy

    AnonGuy Android Enthusiast
    Thread Starter

    I'm from the deep south. South Louisiana. Miles from the Gulf. I've lived in Texas as well.

    Your generalizations are way off base. There are Galaxy S and iPhones everywhere. Their tastes in phones do not differ from anyone else. I haven't seen a 3GS on a long time when visiting there. Most people I know upgrade to newer phones yearly or every two years and they jumped on the iPhone 4, Droids, and Galaxy s4 when they were released even back in 2010. Their kids had iPhones. NFC I can't say. I don't even look for that anymore since it was such a failure to take off when Google pushed it and device support was/is so volatile.

    QR Codes are a retro and most people don't use them. However, Google Goggles can read them, no?

    BBM was using QR codes many years ago. A messaging app using that comes across as old school and retro. I don't know anyone who uses that personally.
     



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  2. Slug

    Slug Check six!
    VIP Member

    I've got a printed QR code (and an NFC tag) stuck to the wall next to my router so that visitors can connect quickly to my wifi AP rather than have to punch in a 32-character password.
     
    MLSS likes this.
  3. AnonGuy

    AnonGuy Android Enthusiast
    Thread Starter

    I have a horse and buggy to take people to the mall.

    Expecting 20 Likes and Thanks...

    Doesn't prove anything other than you have a QR and NFC Tag so people can connect to your Wi-Fi. 99.9999999998% of people don't.

    Which was the point of my reply.

    And the stuff about people in the south was off base. Just cause one community wants to stay stuck in 2007 doesn't mean "the south" is generally that way.

    Their use of tech is no different than the average American. It's like me saying cars aren't that useful cause no one in the Amish community has one...
     
  4. mikedt

    mikedt 你好

    I don't think that QR is used much in the UK either. Much more in Asia, and in China see them everywhere.
    [​IMG]
    Scan your train ticket and find if your train is ontime or not, instead of having to enter the details manually.

    WeChat uses them for exchanging contact details, in the same way as BBM. However difference is most people I know are using WeChat. I also have my WeChat QR on my business card.

    This is from my own business publicity..
    [​IMG]


    The CueCat scanner was a complete failure, after all who wants to sit at their desktop PCs scanning UPC codes from Coca-Cola bottles, etc. LOL. Anyone remember Microsoft TAG? That was another flop.
     
  5. lunatic59

    lunatic59 Moderati ergo sum
    Moderator

    That a bit presumptuous to discount the use of something (QR codes, in this discussion) just because you don't see it applied in your sphere of experience. I find it a bit ironic that it is exactly the same argument you criticized Nick for about the low instances of current smartphones based on his experience.

    Let's keep the discussion civil and the hyperbole to a minimum.

    Many people don't make use of postnet codes either, but the mail would grind to a halt without them. We use QR codes, UPC-A, GTIN, Code39 and several others in our warehouse for inventory control, based on each manufacturer (it's not electronics ... a much lower tech industry.)

    RF chips are used in retail inventory control as well, but the general consumer is pretty much oblivious to them.

    Just because the average Joe doesn't use it, doesn't make them horse and buggy technology or failures. Many times it's an attempt to take a viable technology and expand it's use.

    Sure, QR codes may go the way of the dodo, at least for general information, just like VHS, analog modems and Edsels.

    The fastest way to progress is to build on both our successes and failures and never be afraid to try something new ... except for broccoli ice cream. Some things are just wrong on the face of it. ;) :D
     
    SamuraiBigEd, MLSS and codesplice like this.
  6. AnonGuy

    AnonGuy Android Enthusiast
    Thread Starter

    Airlines using QR codes really has nothing to do with consumers running around with QR code readers to share information with each other, which no one in the South United States does.

    Yes, there are some markets where even NFC is a lot more prevent as well, but that says very little about proliferation of the tech in general. The comment I replied to was a generalization about a specific region of this country - where I grew up and still spend a ton of time (still basically live there).

    Indeed, my train and airline tickets always have QR do bar codes on them. But I have never personally seen someone with QR Codes and NFC Tage around their house. It doesn't surprise me that the first one I've personally heard say they do that is on a tech forum.

    Microsoft Tag was nothing more than Microsoft's Google Goggles. Both apps are largely ignored by consumers now because most people are beyond QR except for the few specific apps that use them (Starbucks, Airlines, Amtrak, etc.) Which they use.

    Entering details manually is not required to check flight info. You open your app and see it kmmediately? Or Google Now/Google or Cortana/Bing just knows it from the information you've received about the flight. Since China blocks a ton of services, their users have to fine alternative methods to fo what is done automatically here.

    It doesn't surprise me that QR usage is higher among consumers there from that standpoint.
     
  7. mikedt

    mikedt 你好

    I'm in London this week, and I've just not seen any publicly placed QRs at all, like they have in China. I see all these "Like us on Facebook" notices in many pubs, clubs, restaurants, hotels, shops, but I'm thinking I have to manually enter and search their name in the Facebook app or website, because FB doesn't use QR or any other electronically readable system.

    In China many places post their equivalent "like us" or "follow us" things for Wechat or QQ or Weibo with a QR, and just about everyone is carrying a smartphone now, point the camera, beep, done. This is why I have a QR on my business cards, it gives anyone interested my Wechat business contact details, quickly and easily.

    When buying train or bus tickets, the smartphone is not usually involved, go to ticket office, buy a paper ticket with cash. So to look up the details for your train, would have to manually enter them if there wasn't a QR on the ticket. Air tickets are somewhat different, because they're nearly always paperless eticket, your smartphone can be the ticket.

    I'm not actually defending QR, just trying to give an idea of how it's often used outside of the United States, particularly in Asia. QR comes from Japan originally, invented for the car industry by Nippon Denso, but is freely licensed for any purpose. Unlike Microsoft TAG or the CueCat. I think the original intention of TAG was to use it in the same manner as QR, but it was proprietary and had to be licensed, so almost nobody was interested in it. Emoji also comes from Japan, hands-up anyone here who uses that?
     
    funkylogik likes this.
  8. lunatic59

    lunatic59 Moderati ergo sum
    Moderator

    I was just browsing through a trade publication and came across this ad. People are using QR codes here and there.
     

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  9. mikedt

    mikedt 你好

    Presumably that QR takes you straight to their website, where you can no doubt buy their products. Makes it easier for your potential customers to find you. Ads are one of the major uses of QR(Quick Response) of course.
    Just like these two..
    [​IMG][​IMG]

    I also often see QRs in airports, malls, bars and restaurants, to try and make it easier to connect to their Wi-Fi. China Mobile operates an "app store" in most of their stores, which is nothing more than a billboard covered in QRs, for hundreds of apps and games you can download.
     
  10. Willdiver

    Willdiver Newbie

    We tried going to a bar code for our parts room inventory. (Bottling plant electrical) but couldn't put enough detail. Found QR to be what we needed (part number and location). I may not use it all that much, but have found a few very helpful uses for it.
     
    Slug and lunatic59 like this.
  11. Slug

    Slug Check six!
    VIP Member

    Which is surely the point of any tech? I couldn't care less whether something is unhip/untrendy/unpopular elsewhere... if it's useful to me that's all that matters.
     
    mikedt likes this.
  12. nickdalzell

    nickdalzell Extreme Android User

    Actually to answer an earlier post my generalizations are only based on my experience where i happen to live. i see broken Galaxy Ss, SIIs are extremely common, but most Android phones seen here are cheap prepaid junk ala Net10, Straight Talk, GoPhone and so on. most carried by kids. the only time, ONLY time i see anything flagship that's recent is when someone well-paid or well-dressed shows up, and i've seen a total of TWO Note 3s, five Galaxy Tab 2 10.1's, and one LG G Flex. i've seen iPhone 4's and 5's carried by a lot of young girls or women, and that's the extent of interest i see around anything new from Apple. a lot of the people who have been Apple fans since 2007 don't like iOS 7 or 8, and keep whatever they had that ran an older version. or replaced it with one they found at a pawn shop here in town. when i paid my Verizon bill, the couple who got an iPhone 6 activated were teens, and it was going to be her's. coincidence? i am not sure. iOS 7 and up seem to sell to those who are new to Apple, new to iOS, and it seems to be the only interest at this time. my dad carries a first generation iPhone, it does email and phone calls/messaging and browses the web, and that's all he wants. his earlier Motorola flip phone recently died. this is his first smartphone.

    My stepfather is new to Apple, never used anything from them. he got an iPhone 5S. he thinks iOS 7 is nice, cool, but he never used earlier versions. he hates Siri and actually argued with it and declared it more problems than it's worth. he does use the fingerprint scanner despite how bad it is at recognizing things. i can actually unlock it myself with my print so whatever it uses to measure biometrics has failed.

    my mom still uses an S3, and it's her first smartphone after a BlackBerry Torch (sorry, i refuse to call a BlackBerry a smartphone at all). she does one thing with it--call people. it has replaced her home phone. she never uses apps, or the Play Store (i even disabled it becauses it was lagging and eating up her battery and depleted her data plan once when it had the sync on and auto-update on. she never uses it so i got rid of it)

    the type of people here, as well as the typical scenery would have you think this were straight out of Andy Griffith. it does have the 'Mayberry' feel. people here are very stuck in their ways, don't tend to be consumerists, keep things decades old, and only replace them when the device they use failed. they often say they had to get a Galaxy or iPhone because they couldn't find what they wanted, they wanted a StarTAC battery, you can't get those--not even at Batteries Plus. so they either got a Rugby, Convoy 3, or a smartphone out of convenience. do they use apps? games? Angry Birds? flappy Bird? nope. mention 'Flappy Bird' around here you get odd stares because it comes off as something dirty around here.

    there are far more flip phones and older models in use than smartphones. are smartphones growing? yep. are they popular among the majority? nope. people either regrettably buy one as the only option, or they are techno geeks from the late 1990s who have the oldest iPhone or whatever works for them.

    Sure, there are new ones in stock, there are people buying them, but if you live here you won't see too many S5's or anything new from Apple in use except by the younger set. people my age tend to keep whatever ancient device they got on their contract years ago, justifying it as 'cheaper to keep using what works fine' or 'if it ain't broke, don't fix it', or even 'i still keep my Galaxy S or Galaxy Nexus because i'm on a grandfathered unlimited data plan and refuse to pay full price for a new model when mine works fine'

    The only mention of NFC is often to sell phones, often by carrier employees, but the most common use is by angry and very aggressive Android fans (who treat Android as some kind of Mormon religion it seems) who think people carrying an iPhone 'need help' and say 'hey my phone has NFC and yours does not' and ironically, most know they have the feature, but either never use it, use it against those who are on an iPhone as some type of superiority complex, or don't even know what it is aside it being on the spec sheet.

    fact is, NFC failed here, you can't even buy tags, and Best Buy will give it to you straight--like the charging mats, there was literally no interest and no point in stocking them. no one knows what NFC is. they might have had one or two kids pair their new Galaxy Gear watch to their S4 the first time using NFC but after that it went on unused. as for QR codes, you're two years out of date for those. they might show up here and there but no one knows what they are, and when they do come out in the open, it's often a new business. you're more likely to see a 'like us on Facebook' than a QR Code.

    We're often a few years behind every major city. in five years? who knows. Note 3s and S5s might be seen as often as flip phones and iPhone 4's
     
  13. mikedt

    mikedt 你好

    If you're living in a bad neighbourhood or a ghetto or the boonies or whatever and can't trust postal or courier deliveries to be reliable. Best Buy does sell them online and you can have them delivered to your local Best Buy store for pick-up. There's likely many accessories, spares and things that Best Buy, Radio Shack, etc. does sell online only, that the local stores don't keep in stock, because of little demand and only a few want them.

    Now if FB were to use QRs on their "Like us on Facebook" things, and in their app, in the same manner that Weibo and WeChat do. We wouldn't have to manually enter and search the name of what they wanted us to "like" or "status update" from.
     
  14. AnonGuy

    AnonGuy Android Enthusiast
    Thread Starter

    Emoji is a character set, hardly comparable to QR codes, and Android didn't even have platform support for it until 4.3. Up until then, the iPhone and Windows Phone were the only two mobile platforms that reliably supported emoji, short of being patched in by the deivice manufacturer (or whomever wrote the software the device runs on).

    QR Codes are used everywhere.

    I don't take issue with the use of QR codes. I only took issue whit the use case presented (which is not common - at least not here) and the person making the part of the country I come from look like Gilligan's Island in an attempt to drive a non-point.

    People view QR codes here as being retro. They don't look at things technologically. They look at it in terms of FAD and Place in History. QR Codes are often associated with Sharing PINs on a Blackberry here. It's just not what most people do anymore.

    And they certainly don't use them to share their WiFi Connection.

    They can set up a Guest Channel with an easy to remember password in their router for that - or just let you use your data plan.
     
  15. bjacks12

    bjacks12 Android Expert

    I miss the days when routers didn't come with preset passwords, so people actually had to set one. It made it so much easier to ask for it when visiting, because they set it and remebered it. Now everybody just leaves the default alphanumeric mumbo-jumbo that is printed on the router, so I usually have to ask to see the damn thing because they have no idea. I've toyed with the idea of setting up an NFC tag for such a purpose.
     
  16. AnonGuy

    AnonGuy Android Enthusiast
    Thread Starter

    I don't let people get on my wireless.

    Ever.
     
  17. nickdalzell

    nickdalzell Extreme Android User

    I think QR Codes are easy ways to get suckered into loading up some malware site or advertising page. but essentially serve no purpose in my life or the lives of anyone here. the last thing I need is another app taking up phone storage just to save myself the extra two seconds of typing in a web URL. are people seriously that lazy?

    Essentially they are the second coming of the CueCat--that I agree with. they work essentially the same way. scan the code, get whisked away to whoever's site the code belongs to. the difference is that it's more mobile and the codes are not found in TV Guides exclusively (or RadioShack ads)
     
  18. mikedt

    mikedt 你好

    As you're not in Asia and most likely using Facebook, rather than Weixin or Weibo, that's probably the case.
     
  19. lunatic59

    lunatic59 Moderati ergo sum
    Moderator

    They can be incredibly helpful. For example, a local shopping mall prints a brochure or ad and wants to let people quickly put the location into Google maps for direction. Scan a QR code or type this ...

    Code (Text):
    1. [plain]https://www.google.com/maps/place/King+of+Prussia+Mall/@40.089071,-75.385778,17z/data=!3m1!4b1!4m2!3m1!1s0x89c6944ab30b8765:0x21c6a02d866542a5[/plain]
    Let me know how long that takes you to type on a phone and get it right. ;)


    Yep.
     
    funkylogik likes this.
  20. nickdalzell

    nickdalzell Extreme Android User

    90% of the times they are not helpful at all. 90% of the time you scan one you get tons of ads, or possibly malware or some company's info put into your contacts without your permission.

    Unless there were some kind of standard that required them to be used for wifi hotspots or coupons, or purchasing groceries online and having them delivered to your home, I fail to see the point at all. as does 90% of North America.

    I hardly notice them much these days because they've disappeared for the most part, and the few instances they do show I have no interest (like i'm going to scan a QR to get a
    free Egg and Sausage McMuffin from McDonald's. please)

    BTW the browser in my smartphone hardly gets any use save for the times I need a quick Google search where pulling out my tablet and connecting to the internet with it first is less convenient. other than that I don't use the phone's web browser for anything. I use apps. 90% of my use for a smartphone is playing/buying music, a quick game of Angry Birds, checking email, or the weather for the day or week ahead. most if not all of that is built-in and needs no apps from Play Store to work. usually the only URL I type when i'm on my phone is 'www.google.com' (when it doesn't automatically load up in Chrome). for anything more intensive I have a laptop or large tablet for. not that hard to type an URL. too many lazy people out there. no wonder 'texting' speak has caught on and is ruining the language. You would be surprised how many can't spell 'you' properly these days.
     
  21. mikedt

    mikedt 你好

    There's no getting away from QRs in some places.
    [​IMG][​IMG]
    And of course almost everyone has a smart-phone with Wechat and/or Weibo on it.
     
  22. nickdalzell

    nickdalzell Extreme Android User

    Yeesh. I hear some places put the codes in dangerous (billboard signs, on the backs of buses, etc) or obscure (subway tunnels without cell data coverage, on websites) places but as stated you won't find them much at all here except for a new business. The local Sport clips store that just opened has QR Codes on their business cards. It leads to ads though I asked.
     
  23. lunatic59

    lunatic59 Moderati ergo sum
    Moderator

    There was a qr code on the bottle of Louis Jadot Beaujolais that I had with dinner. It took me to a mobile version of their website with a handy little party calculator in it (put it the number of guests and the duration of the party and it tells you how much wine to buy. 90% of me was pleasantly surprised. The other 10% was too busy finishing the bottle ;)
     
  24. mikedt

    mikedt 你好

    We have cellular and WiFi service on our subways. :p

    It's true, most public QRs do lead to ads. That's why they're on every seat in a railway station. I have a QR on my business card, it's a "Friend me on Wechat" code, basically the equivalent of "Like us on Facebook", except people don't have to manually enter my username and search for me.
     
  25. nickdalzell

    nickdalzell Extreme Android User

    I think the problem here is that no one knows what they are, and the few who did scan one got sent ads or got someone they didn't want added to their contacts or got to a malware site, so those who had bad luck decided to tell others and news travels fast.

    I think most can agree at least in North America QR Codes, Code Matrices and MS Tags like their CueCat brethren are abused or used for some pretty annoying things, and it kinda killed them here. Not knowing where one leads and the risk of getting something undesirable isn't worth it to many.

    And maybe it's just that I'm not lazy and can spell whole words when texting, but I can enter someone's name on Facebook faster than I can scan a QR successfully. Quite frankly I'm not sure why text shorthand got popular and is still used. There was a time when texts were charged by the letter which explains why 'u' replaced 'you' and so on, however it doesn't explain why such shorthand is used today.
     
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