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The "Linux questions (and other stuff)" thread

Discussion in 'Computers' started by MoodyBlues, Jan 17, 2013.

  1. MoodyBlues

    MoodyBlues - Crazy peacock person -
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    Oh, I see. Doesn't Nautilus have that built in? I don't like Nautilus, but maybe in a pinch...?
     

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  2. lunatic59

    lunatic59 Moderati ergo sum
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    If I want to do any root file management with a GUI, I'll fire up a terminal session, elevate that session to root and then "sudo nautilus". Nautilus then runs as rood for the duration.
     
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  3. GameTheory

    GameTheory Android Expert
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    From what I've seen over the years in the linux community is that you shouldn't use "sudo" to open any GUIs. Instead suppose to use "gksudo or gksu", which have been deprecated and now should be using "pkexec". Of course sudo is still used for anything non-gui.

    https://askubuntu.com/a/270019

    sudo apt install pkexec
    pkexec nautilus
     
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  4. MoodyBlues

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    I'm old school! Using a fancy-schmancy, pretty GUI for root work just doesn't feel right somehow. Seeing that beautiful # prompt at a command line makes me feel like I'm home. :)
     
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  5. GameTheory

    GameTheory Android Expert
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    Well I'm with you on that, but we need them purdy GUIs :p if we are to de-throne windows from the consumer desktop dominance. Linux needs to appeal to them windows users that are afraid of it. :eek:
     
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  6. MoodyBlues

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    Oh, I'm all for them purdy GUIs--just look at my copious writing about my beloved, beautiful KDE. :D

    No, I just mean for any work as root, you'll find me at a command line.

    Speaking of window$ users: does their UI still look ugly and childish? Seriously, when I see screenshots from window$ boxes, it hits me how ugly its icons and toolbars and...everything look so amateurish compared to KDE. Can they customize everything, like with KDE? Or are they still basically stuck with whatever Redmond gives them? :rolleyes:
     
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  7. GameTheory

    GameTheory Android Expert
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    Not sure on the looks. I hear they finally got a dark theme which we've had forever. :rolleyes: I don't think they can customize much outside of their god mode if that's still a thing. Since theirs is called god mode and doesn't do much, then what would ours be called that does everything you can think of? :eek: :p Mind Blown! :goofydroid:
     
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  8. Dngrsone

    Dngrsone Android Expert
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    Microsoft absolutely hates "Power Users"; that is, anyone who likes to rummage around under the hood, and have been making things more and more difficult for us since Vista.

    They have said as much in writing, even. Their customer base is corporate, and the millions of home users of all grades are secondary, if that, so they really don't care about their wants and needs unless or until a corporate concern makes a request. Then, likely, it will only be something available at a price.
     
  9. MoodyBlues

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    None of this surprises me. :rolleyes:

    The elegance and gracefulness of KDE, along with its infinite customization possibilities, should be shown to every window$ user. If they only knew how beautiful--and stable and secure!--their PCs could be, maybe they'd switch. :)
     
  10. Dngrsone

    Dngrsone Android Expert
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    Though if they could allow rotating cube when moving between Activities, it would sell even better...
     
  11. MoodyBlues

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    Okay, guys, here's a head-scratcher. And it's a totally LOW priority problem. :)

    I use KSnapshot for taking screenshots. I've always loved its auto-incrementing way of suggesting names for files as you're saving them. Say that I'd taken a screenshot and saved it as SeaMonkey_112204_1.jpeg (where 112204 is a date), then I took another screenshot and went to "save as," it would show SeaMonkey_112204_2.jpeg. Very handy when you're taking/saving a bunch of related screenshots.

    If I'd named the initial file SeaMonkey_112204.jpeg, the auto-incremented one would be SeaMonkey_112205.jpeg. Not what I'd want, so I just don't ever put the date at the end.

    A file name ending in an alpha character, like SeaMonkey.jpeg, would get auto-incremented to SeaMonkey1.jpeg.

    Just recently, it's doing something new. :eek:

    A file I'd named Ancestry_JohnDoe_1930census.jpeg had its suggested next file named Ancestry_JohnDoe_1931census.jpeg, instead of the expected Ancestry_JohnDoe_1930census1.jpeg.

    As always, I'm running old versions of everything, including Kubuntu and KSnapshot, and do not allow any automatic updates--so nothing could've changed. And it's been eons since I even looked at KSnapshot's settings, so no changes there either.
     
  12. Dngrsone

    Dngrsone Android Expert
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    Possibly because I hate myself, I am once again messing around with my laptop...

    History
    My Toshiba P55t-B5154 has a 2TB drive on it. Of course, initially it was a pure Win 10 machine, but I quickly disabused it of that notion: I shrunk the drive as far as I could from within Win (Fun fact, WIndows will only shrink your hard drive down by half the drive size. This means my Windows main Partition went down to just under 1 TB)

    I then used a Mint (at the time 17.1) Live disc, and repartitioned the drive using KParted. I squeezed that Windows partition down to a paltry 250GB, created a 500GB NTFS partition for all my common data (think photos, music, etc), made a swap drive at the very end of the drive and then a bunch of 100GB partitions as I needed them.

    For each Linux OS, I would create two 100GB partitions: the primary (root) partition, and a /home partition.

    I installed rEFInd for my bootloader and set it as the primary bootloader, so none of my subsequent installs will mess things up (much)

    That initial Mint 17.1 KDE was upgraded at some point to 17.3, and as I added more OSes, it ended up getting plowed under in favor of something else.

    Current installations

    As of this moment, I have the following:

    Win 10 (250GB)
    /Data (500GB)
    Neon 5.15 (100GB root + 100GB /home)
    Mint 18.1 KDE (100GB root + 100GB /home)
    Mint 18 xfce (100GB root + 100GB /home)
    Mint 18.3 KDE (100GB root + 100GB /home)
    Kaos (108GB)

    Okay, so I had an extra partition, and I thought Kaos, being a minimal KDE install could go in there for giggles. It is painfully white at the moment, which makes it doubly painful in this dark bedroom, hah.

    Newly generated problems

    With the exception of Kaos, the rest of my Linux installs are *buntu derivatives, and play fairly nicely with rEFInd.

    Kaos, though... it uses a systemd (formerly gummi?) bootloader and it has muddied things up. SOmewhere along the way, I ended up filling the entire 100MB /boot partition, so I had make some room by deleting what I thought were unnecessary files (18 old versions of vmlinuz, for instance), but rEFINd didn't seem to be seeing Kaos at all. I could only get to it via Neon's GRUB (which I luckily haven't deleted yet).

    I finally figured out which of the extra generic logins belonged to Kaos, but somewhere I broke it-- booting into the systemd.efi file results in a hung computer which requires me to force-shutdown to recover from.

    I wanted to clean up the /boot folder and fix things up a little, because it takes forever for rEFInd to scan a 2TB drive for bootloaders. Ideally, I again teach myself to write actual entries for each OS and turn off the search function, but that's pretty close to work at this point in time.

    Not to mention I have recently got it in my head that I want to drop an SSD in this thing, and a friend convinced me that I should remove my optical drive and put a second HDD in its place.

    Therefore, the near-term goal (as in, maybe this year) would be to invest in a 1TB SSD to put all the OSes in, and pointing the important /home folders to the second drive, probably the original 2TB spinny, and the optical in a separate enclosure (SATA to USB 3.0) for those times when I want to watch a movie or something.

    If I do that, then I will definitely need to know what I am doing for rEFInd and get things settled in for the longer term.

    TL;DR

    I'm bitching because i started rummaging around in the /boot partition and shit is ugly with a big UH!

    ...and it's 2335, and way too late for me to be thinking clearly, anyway.
     
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  13. MoodyBlues

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    In my humble opinion, and experience, you're allocating a lot more space to your / partitions than you'll ever need. Personally, I wouldn't make it more than 50GB, and even that is ridiculously huge.
     
  14. LV426

    LV426 I say we take off and nuke this place from orbit
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    I've got an 83G root partition on my Ubuntu system. It currently has 69G available, so I'll probably reallocate some of that space to /home at some point.
     
  15. Dngrsone

    Dngrsone Android Expert
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    Hm. I'll have look at that. I calculated the usage of both partitions together, but didn't look at the usage of the root partitions alone.
     
  16. GameTheory

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    It was interesting to see you folks' drive configs. I have my xubuntu setup split among 3 drives:

    1. 128gb SSD for the OS and some apps. (108gb free space)
    2. 250gb HDD for Android Studio and all its' caching and projects and some apps.
    3. 250gb HDD for miscellaneous storage, linked to chrome browser for its' caching and downloads, and for compiling kernel sources.

    This makes it super easy and quick if I decide to switch to another distro since only the OS and a few apps are on the main drive. Also prolongs the SSD since writes are very limited with this config.
     
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  17. MoodyBlues

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    I've been following the exact same partitioning scheme for decades(?) now, and it works really well for me.

    On any hard drive, its partitions consist of:
    /
    /home
    /data
    [swap space]

    The sizes have changed over the years, of course, as hard drives have gotten bigger. I allocate a very small percentage to its / partition--never more than 50GB, and even that is excessive.

    /home probably gets about 30%.

    /data gets the majority of space--it's where photos, videos, downloads, etc., live.

    Swap space is really just an old habit now; I've heard it's not actually necessary any more. Perhaps when I get my next computer, I'll kiss swap goodbye! :D
     
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  18. MoodyBlues

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    Your root partitions really don't need a lot of space, especially if you're installing programs elsewhere. I mean programs other than the OS. The OS isn't a big, bloated, space-eating monster...like some other OSes. :D So its space requirements are quite meager.

    Naturally, you want to allow space for programs you'll install in the future, but anything >50GB is just unnecessary.
     
  19. MoodyBlues

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    Yeah, that sounds about right. :)
    That's what I'd do. Well, sort of--I'd put it in /data, but it's the same idea.
     
  20. Dngrsone

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    So, I took a look, and of the root partitions, the heaviest is just shy of 23GB, so yes, it looks like I could shave that down to 50GB easy.

    Meanwhile, I managed to break my bootup of Mint 18.1 KDE somehow... I'll have to read the fine print more thoroughly to understand what exactly is wrong/missing to cause the kernel panic.

    Also, it turns out that rEFInd does not have a native xfs driver, which is why it is not seeing Kaos as bootable. I found a driver, but it seems to break rEFInd. Luckily, I have the Neon Grub still there and that loads up after rEFInd dies.

    In fact, I gleaned a few tidbits from that grub.cfg so that I can hopefully build a bootup script into rEFInd, but I am so nervous about doing this and breaking things hard-core.

    Part of the issue is that each OS does things differently, even different forks of Ubuntu; so I have some booting straight from the /boot partition, others boot from their own root partition /boot folders... my /boot partition is 100MB, and that is apparently no longer a viable size, as it is full, and I'm kind of surprised the last OS install actually worked with it. Maybe that's why some of the OSes are booting off their root partitions?

    I guess I should allocate something like 500MB on the next iteration...
     
  21. LV426

    LV426 I say we take off and nuke this place from orbit
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  22. GameTheory

    GameTheory Android Expert
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    Interesting. It could quite possibly be that what I saw which in this case wouldn't be useful.

    That's a pretty big step for windows users. Seems like a better solution than Cygwin which I think attempted to do the same thing?

    Ok I had enough windows talk for one day. It's about all I can take. :p
     
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  23. LV426

    LV426 I say we take off and nuke this place from orbit
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    It is a big thing for Windows users. But Bash window is a different animal to Cygwin, which is a more feature rich environment. The Bash shell is more integrated with Windows, and has some basic utilities.

    But yeah that's me maxed out with Win talk for today - now back to the usual programmes :)
    If you like we can take this discussion to the Linux thread, but I don't how @MoodyBlues would react to polluting that discussion with Windows garbage :eek:

    https://androidforums.com/threads/the-linux-questions-and-other-stuff-thread.677807/
     
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  24. MoodyBlues

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    No worries! :D

    Anything that's Linux-related is fine there, IMHO.
     
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  25. MoodyBlues

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    Hi there, @RealMacleod! I heard my name, so I dropped in. :) I have some thoughts I'd like to share.
    We're just trying to help. :D Suggesting that you use an OS that is more stable, secure, powerful, and customizable than the one you're using is a good thing.

    But aside from that, you're developing Linux (Android) apps--it could be a huge plus if you used and learned about Linux in its native form. Understanding how things work in Linux, like how its file system is arranged and named, would be useful in creating Android apps.
    Are you aware that Linux has thousands of native apps? Apps that are as good as, or better than, their counterparts on other OSes? For example, the GIMP can replace Photoshop.

    I know nothing about "3dMAX"--but there may be a Linux alternative.

    Most Linux software is free, and easily installed with a click or two from one's favorite package manager, such as mine, Synaptic.

    Some games played on other OSes have native Linux counterparts; those that don't may be playable via wine. I used to play Roller Coaster Tycoon that way, and it ran like a dream! There are also tons of Linux-only games, installable as described above, with a few clicks.
    I know nothing about that or, really, dual-booting (which I haven't done since...1994(?)), but if others are suggesting it, rest assured they know what they're talking about.

    I'll finish by saying that modern Linux distros range from easy-peasy (aimed at transitioning windows users) to those aimed at hardcore *nix geeks.

    Once you find out how fast, secure, beautiful, stable and reliable it is--and that, unlike windows, you're in complete control--you're likely to make it your only OS. Everything in my house runs [some variation of] Linux! Two desktop computers, two laptops, one tablet, two smartphones, and two DVRs. Maybe my microwave and range, too. :thinking:

    If you have any questions at all, please join us in the Linux mega-thread! :blushDroid:
     

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