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General triumph's network frequency question

Discussion in 'Android Devices' started by yodelyfish, Jun 26, 2011.

  1. yodelyfish

    yodelyfish Lurker
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    i'm having trouble finding a definitive answer on what the triumph will support when its released. The official motorola page says cdma 1900mhz only, but other sites such as phonescoop or gsm arena say that it supports 800mhz/1900mhz. Can anyone find any solid evidence of either claims?
     

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  2. Bob Maxey

    Bob Maxey Android Expert
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    No offence, but really? You take some forum posters comments or theories over the official manufacturer's web site? Not sure how much solid evidence is out there if you do not believe the manufacturer;s web site.

    Motorola Mobility, Inc. - Media Center - Fact Sheets - Motorola TRIUMPH? Fact Sheet
     
  3. harvickchick

    harvickchick Android Enthusiast
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    What does that mean exactly? the MHz thing?
     
  4. Bob Maxey

    Bob Maxey Android Expert
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    Megahertz is a measure of frequency. Think of it as a 'speed limit.'
     
  5. Gmash

    Gmash Android Expert
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    Plus some frequencies are better at penetrating into buildings and such. It really isn't going to affect you unless you are planning on trying to flash the phone to a different carrier, as the different carriers use different frequencies.
     
  6. agianne

    agianne Well-Known Member
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    The regulatory documents that Motorola filed with the FCC show that the phone operates in the 1900 MHz frequency range only. (The other frequency ranges shown are for WiFi and Bluetooth). The FCC OET TCB electronic filing site doesn't support linking, but you can search on the Triumph's FCCID of IHDT56MS1 and read up if you'd like. (The docs are in PDF format.) https://apps.fcc.gov/oetcf/eas/reports/GenericSearch.cfm

    In yodelyfish's defense, I don't blame yodelyfish for not trusting the Motorola (or any company's) web site. Those pages are authored by Marketing folks and are subject to mistakes, errors and omissions that come from the author not having a firm grip on the technical aspects.

    The Triumph page at Motorola Mobility, Inc. - Media Center - Fact Sheets - Motorola TRIUMPH? Fact Sheet is, unfortunately, an example of this. The page reads "Bands/Modes - EVDO rA Data Network (1900 only)" That's not wrong, but it was apparently written by someone who has little familiarity with basic cellular communications concepts. First of all, they've got "Bands/Modes" listed on the left, then they've entered the data in Mode/Band order on the right. I can understand writing "EVDO rA" in an internal e-mail to a colleague, but for a customer facing website they should have listed "EV-DO rev. A" or preferably "CDMA EV-DO rev. A". 1900 what? pennies? years? MHz? Why did they put "1900" in parentheses? This kind of thing doesn't exactly inspire confidence in the reliability of the information. I don't blame yodelyfish for seeking clarification.
     
  7. cutterjohn

    cutterjohn Android Enthusiast
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    Bzzzt! WRONG answer!

    Think of it as the channel that your TV, radio, etc. is tuned to.
     
  8. Bob Maxey

    Bob Maxey Android Expert
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    Buzz! Laughably WRONG answer.

    Megahertz is indeed a measure of frequency and speed. Consider your first computer running at less than 10 MHz. It was replaced by a computer running at a far faster speed.

    We have one large electromagnetic spectrum. Radio, light, sound, RF, (Radio Frequency) all sit along side each other in a very long, continuous space called the Electromagnetic Spectrum.

    At 3.800 MHz, I can use it to communicate with mates on CW; as frequency increases, "speed" increases until we reach a point where the radio waves can cook an egg in your microwave oven.
     
  9. BeTrue

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    Laughably wrong yourself, when considering the context of what was being asked.

    The mhz question is asking what 1900mhz cdma means - the correct answer IS a frequency channel the phone is capable of using. It is a single frequency USA only phone unable to use the old 900 frequency.
     
  10. cutterjohn

    cutterjohn Android Enthusiast
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    Sorry bub, but channel is a more proper answer. Yes Hz does indeed exactly mean per second, so in this case MHz means millions of cycles per second, however it really has NOTHING directly to do with "speed". The frequency refers to a particular channel at which data is transmitted and then dependent upon the power, encoding, etc. of that data you end up with something that is able to provide data/voice/etc. ad nauseum at some rate. The data rate/voice/etc. are dependent upon the technology used to encode that data/voice/etc. and the laws of physics.

    You my "friend" are confusing things here and clearly haven't the faintest idea what you're babbling about, but I've come to accept that as the norm in android phone forums. So, I'm going to let you go do a bit of reading by pointing a fairly decent wikipedia article for you to bone up on as you clearly need it...
    Frequency - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    [EDIT]
    Here's part 2 in your re-education course:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Radio_communication
    [/EDIT]

    @betrue ty
    Android phone forums are driving me nuts with all of the people constantly spouting off all sorts of misinformation... (I still chuckle every time that I see someone claim that the Intercept has no GPU... (it has the mali-200 as it's using the s3c6410))
     
  11. agianne

    agianne Well-Known Member
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    Well, I'd agree that it has nothing to do with "speed limit". That was a poorly chosen metaphor.

    The "speed limit" on electromagnetic waves is the same at all frequencies propagating through a given medium. (That's 186,000 miles/sec in a vacuum a.k.a "light speed".)

    If one wants to use a transportation metaphor, it would be better to compare "frequency band" to a particular lane in a multi-lane freeway. One lane isn't inherently faster than another, the lanes are just arbitrary divisions to keep traffic orderly. The only key rules are that you must stay in your lane and you can't interfere with traffic in adjacent lanes.

    If you run into a "speed limit" it's because your car's power is maxed out and/or because your rules about how to drive in the lane aren't promoting maximum efficiency. The speed limit has nothing to do with qualities inherent to the lane. A 1900 MHz cellular network is not twice as fast as an otherwise identical 800 MHz cellular network anymore than lane "4" on the freeway is twice as fast as lane "2".
     
  12. cutterjohn

    cutterjohn Android Enthusiast
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    Yep, but it also takes into consideration if you want to add in things like compression, and signal encoding. Some encoding strategies are fairly wasteful, although from what I gather(not really interested in radio communications outside of where they intersect network communications) the encoding schemes that they use are supposedly very efficient...

    I used the channel analogy as it was something that even the ignorant could relate to.
     
  13. agianne

    agianne Well-Known Member
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    You shouldn't be trying to do that - that reflects confusion about fundamental cellular networking concepts. "MHz" has nothing to do with compression or signal encoding. When talking about "MHz", "speed limit" is simply incorrect.

    Would some humor help?

    The "speed limit" metaphor started out in left field and at this point it has climbed over the fence, crossed the street, caught a cab and is standing in the lobby of the restaurant a couple of miles from the ball park. I suggest we buy it a plane ticket and let it fly a long, long way from here and hope it never returns. You probably already know this, but that metaphor acts like your friend to your face, but it has been talking ship about you behind your back. You helped that metaphor move, but when it came time to help you move, that metaphor said it'd be there and never showed up. That metaphor is not your friend. Why you keep defending it, I can't understand.
     

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