1. Are you ready for the Galaxy S20? Here is everything we know so far!

Why is Technicolor no longer a thing?

Discussion in 'TV & Video' started by dontpanicbobby, Jul 12, 2017.

  1. dontpanicbobby

    dontpanicbobby 100% That Guy
    VIP Member Thread Starter

    Movies have such a gloomy color pallete these days.
     



    1. Download the Forums for Android™ app!


      Download

       
  2. mikedt

    mikedt 你好

    I saw Despicable Me 3 on Monday, that certainly wasn't gloomy.
     
    psionandy likes this.
  3. dontpanicbobby

    dontpanicbobby 100% That Guy
    VIP Member Thread Starter

    It was an animated movie Mike. No one can sit through a drab animated movie unless they're a critic.
     
    mikedt likes this.
  4. psionandy

    psionandy Extreme Android User

     
    Leon Marco and mikedt like this.
  5. Leon Marco

    Leon Marco Well-Known Member

    Try giving us an example.
     
    NightAngel79 likes this.
  6. Deleted User

    Deleted User Guest

    300. Drab sepia tone

     
    dontpanicbobby likes this.
  7. mikedt

    mikedt 你好


    A war movie. I've never seen it, but perhaps a drab pallet suits the subject better over gaudy bright Technicolor. Other examples I can think of, The Elephant Man and Schindler's List, both made in black & white of course.
     
  8. Deleted User

    Deleted User Guest

    Schindlers List worked in black and white for me. It's a very sombre subject.
    I don't so much mind drab colour palettes, but the shaky cam technique is more annoying for me. As used in some action films, like Transformers.
     
  9. dontpanicbobby

    dontpanicbobby 100% That Guy
    VIP Member Thread Starter

    I like Black & White.

    My example would be Batman vs Superman for gloomy visuals. 300 was bright and sunny compared to that flick.

    I saw Tramsformers in a theatre and had no idea which robot was doing what during the action sequences. Shaky-cam worked for The Blair Witch Project, wish it had stopped there.
     
  10. psionandy

    psionandy Extreme Android User

    Turns out, colour in movies is more complicated than I thought......


    here's a short film from Wired filling in some of the details...

     
    Leon Marco and dontpanicbobby like this.
  11. Phalon4

    Phalon4 Android Enthusiast

    When the term Technicolor came out back in the days. It was a new technology and exciting time to colorize Motion Pictures. These days the term Technicolor is old and it came and when like the technology of the phonograph and VCR. The new digital imagery of today's cinematography , 3D and digitally enhanced graphics just made the term Technicolor a thing of the past that pretty much just outlived its usefulness.
     
  12. dontpanicbobby

    dontpanicbobby 100% That Guy
    VIP Member Thread Starter

    Color is essential to modern life. Granted colors are muted in films now but using "Doctor Strange" and " Suicide Squad" as examples it looks like they're bringing color back. :)
     
  13. Phalon4

    Phalon4 Android Enthusiast

    Just take a look at any National Geographics program and you'll see what I'm talking about.
     
  14. mikedt

    mikedt 你好

    Technicolor the brand now, is all about cable modems, satellite & cable TV boxes, patent and codec licensing, etc, and nothing to do with motion picture production. It's Technicolor SA, which was Thomson SA, a French multinational tech conglomerate.
     
  15. Phalon4

    Phalon4 Android Enthusiast

    http://www.dictionary.com/browse/technicolor

    And on another hand it became too expensive to keep producing films in Technicolor.
    Among all the facts discussed, I have learned quite a bit about the company Technicolor itself.
    From 1915 until 1932, Technicolor started experimenting with two-strips Technicolor. They produced numerous shorts to try to get the studios interested by their process. At first, they were really struggling. It's not until 1928 that Color suddenly became an issue with the advent of sound. They could promote their films as all-talking, all-dancing and in 'natural color'. But alas, this two-strips system failed to catch on the public as it wasn't that natural after all!!!
    Still, in The Black Pirate (1926) by Albert Parker with Douglas Fairbanks Sr, there is a marvellous use of this two-strips process. The Kino edition of the film is really nice.
    In 1932 until 1953, Technicolor developed his three-strips process (incorporating Cyan, Magenta and Yellow). They managed to convinced Disney to produces some cartoons with this process. I saw two early examples: Flowers and Trees (1932) and Country Cousin (1935). These two Disney showed the wonderful quality of the process with a myriad of shades. These two original prints were still of stunning quality. The first feature film made in Technicolor was Becky Sharp (1935) by Rouben Mamoulian. From that date, films in color slowly took off. The film taht really launched Technicolor was Disney's Snow White and The Seven Dwarfs(1937). from that date, the number of Technicolor films took off until the arrival of a new technical modification that suddenly put a stop to the expansion: CinemaScope.
    In 1953, XXth century Fox produced the first ever CinemaScope film, The Robe by Henry Koster with Richard Burton. the complex three-strips camera proved impossible to use with the new anamorphic lens. And Fox turned to a new monopack system: Kodak's Eastmancolor. I saw an excerpt of an original print of The Robe, alas -as with most Eastmancolor films- it had turned pinkish. But the level of sharpness was immensely better than the Technicolor one. Technicolor had to work harder to overcome the problem with the CinemaScope lens. They finally overcame it by 1957. The sharness was now equivalent to that of the Eastmancolor. I saw a wonderful excerpt of Funny Face (1957) by Stanley Donen (so often only available as a ghastly PD print!) which showed the extreme quality of the process.
    Technicolor abandoned completely the three-packs process in 1974 and joined forces with Eastman to create a mono-pack. They never stopped experimenting even with film format: Techniscope, VistaVision and so on...
    I saw also some incredible 70 mm excerpts from Spartacus (1960) and from A Star is Born (1954) in its original 1:2.55 format! Believe me it's HUGE! And Cukor made the best use of it placing actors at the extreme of the screens. No way you can appreciate that on a TV....

    Overall, I felt that the dye transfer system used by technicolor in its golden years (1935-53) was incredibly rich and offered some very stable prints which have kept their pristine colors. On the down side, as it's a dye transfer, you get a bit of diffusion and less sharpness. But this was used by cinematographers to get some wonderful 'portrait' effects of the stars. Particularly red-heads: Deborah Kerr, Rita Hayworth and Maureen O'Hara just to mention a few.
     
    #15 Phalon4, Jul 16, 2017
    Last edited: Jul 16, 2017
    dontpanicbobby and mikedt like this.
Loading...
Similar Threads - Why Technicolor longer
  1. kylabeardad
    Replies:
    6
    Views:
    543
  2. Dannydet
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    414
  3. Babyvelvet
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    802
  4. BeckJohn21
    Replies:
    2
    Views:
    932
  5. groston
    Replies:
    5
    Views:
    1,149
  6. bored_phonenobb123
    Replies:
    5
    Views:
    1,944
  7. Anita Buchanan
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    1,274
  8. Papamalo
    Replies:
    4
    Views:
    1,053
  9. codezer0
    Replies:
    9
    Views:
    1,821
  10. anon125
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    1,148

Share This Page

Loading...