Buy the Captivate or wait for Dual Cpu's?


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  1. xnoctis93

    xnoctis93 Well-Known Member This Topic's Starter

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    Hi: So my carrier(Rogers) plans to get the Samsung Captivate any week now. With that being said, I just read up today on Dual Core CPU's coming in around Q4 / Januaryish. I'm wondering, should I wait for the dual core phones to come out, to take the plunge right now and buy the Captivate. I do think the captivate is a beautiful phone, but I am not sure If in the future I will big time be missing on not getting a dual CPU. So you know, I don't really play very many games(if any really) on phones, as I use my psp, and ds for handheld gaming.

    Please help me decide. Thanks :)
     

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  2. bigal77

    bigal77 Member

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    Dont wait !!!
    When they say January, they mean parts of the US, you wont see those on rogers until Holiday 2011 at the earliest. Just get the captivate, will keep you busy and happy for a year, then will have high resale value if you really need to upgrade.
     
  3. idilium

    idilium Well-Known Member

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    look it this way this phone have amazing things to offer the screen the sound the speed and the freedom to customize it the way you like it.
    i have the phone for over a month and i still changing things around and learning new stuff about this phone.
    and the speed this phone have is capable for most of the future apps you can trow at it.
    if you want to start having fun buy this phone.you have a month to change your mind but I'm sure you will not
     
  4. Ph8

    Ph8 Well-Known Member

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    You probably wont use the phone to its full expectations as you dont do gaming on it. Also, if you wait for the Dual Core phones, youll hear about the Quad Core phones "right around the corner". Its a never ending cycle, so its a decision you need to make on what you need\want out of phone and once you make that decision stick with it until your ready for a new phone.
     
  5. emuneee

    emuneee Well-Known Member

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    Answer this question. Why do you want a dual CPU smartphone? If you can't answer this, get the Captivate.

    There will always be something around the corner.
     
  6. sremick

    sremick Well-Known Member

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    Cell phones differ from computers in that they can't just drop a new CPU into the pick line, bump the model number of the system +10, and call it a day. These miniature devices are very-tightly designed around a specific CPU and all its unique constraints. Often other parts of the R&D are dictated by specific component choices.

    There's going to be significant delay between a new chip being announced by the chipmaker, and actual finished devices using it being available for-sale to the consumer. Unless you're willing to wait 6 months to 1 year or so, I would buy something today if you need something today.

    There's always going to be something new either already announced, or announced soon after, when you make a technology purchase. That's just the way the industry works. The train never stops... so if you always wait for stillness, you'll never go anywhere.
     
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  7. Dimcorner

    Dimcorner Active Member

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    If you think people had battery issues with a single core processor...
    I guess they can always make the phone thicker and stick a fatter batter on to it.

    If you always want the newest thing when they are announced you will wait forever. There will always be something better a few months down.

    I remember when I bought my TV. Do I want Sony Trinitron flat tube or wait for DLP, do I want DLP or wait for plasma or LCD, do I want 720p or wait for 1080i, do I want 1080i or wait for 1080p, do I get ultra thin or wait for 3dTv. Took me 2 years to finally say screw it and bought a plasma Panasonic.
     
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  8. yahoowizard

    yahoowizard Well-Known Member

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    I have to say. I don't really think the Captivate can work much faster than it already does. I mean, my iPhone 2G worked pretty damn fast, with only short delays, and that's about a 600 MHz processor. For a phone, your browser might open like, .2 miliseconds faster or something with dual core, but yeah, someone did say you could basically use it as a computer which is why the dual core can help. It can hook up to two displays, I'm sure Android has some way of getting it to work with a bluetooth keyboard and mouse, and boom, you got a CPU in your pocket.
     
  9. robhs

    robhs Well-Known Member

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    Get the Captivate, you will be gald you did. It is the best phone I have ever owned, even with the faulty GPS.
     
  10. RingMe

    RingMe Active Member

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    Motorola announced a 2.0 ghz phone processor before the end of the year. That will roughly be twice as fast anything on the market today.
     
  11. bllester

    bllester Member

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    I don't even want to think about the battery life of a dual core phone. This one is bad enough.
     
  12. Max Tempest

    Max Tempest Well-Known Member

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    Get the Captivate, but wait a little bit and see if you can get it after the GPS and/or Froyo update.
     
  13. emuneee

    emuneee Well-Known Member

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  14. myrv

    myrv Well-Known Member

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    Not a fan of Motorola lately with their closed door policies. As for a dual core or a 2 ghz processor, the problem I am seeing currently is that battery technology isn't keeping up with power demands. I am going to go out on a limb here and assume that the dual core and 2 ghz cpu's are made with a smaller than 45nm die?
     
  15. vapor311

    vapor311 Well-Known Member

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    im hearing LATE 2011 for dual core phones.
     
  16. mesasone

    mesasone Well-Known Member

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    I wouldn't wait for a phone with a dual core solution OR a 2 GHz processor. I don't think that our current phones/software really take advantage of the power they have now, let alone all the additional horsepower you're talking about. Maybe in a year, but by then you'll be starting to look at upgrade to something even more powerful anyway. In the case of the Orion - Samsung's newly announced dual core successor to the Hummingbird, it will probably be AT LEAST 6 months before an Orion powered device surfaces, let alone makes it on the shelves of the carriers.

    Whether or not you want to get a Captivate is up to you, I think it's a great phone - but there will be other phones, greater phones, coming out in the future - there always will be. But as long as you like the Captivate and it does what you need, I would say get it!

    Now, I'm looking forward to getting a 7" android tablet, but in this case I will be holding out for the next generation of hardware. I'm going to wait for one that offers a dual core processor, HDMI out, proper bluetooth support and SDXC expansion slot - I think the SDXC spec tops out at like 2 TERABYTES as opposed to the 32gigs we have with microSDHC. And a 7" AMOLED would be nice, although I may be pushing it there...
     
  17. rajendra82

    rajendra82 Well-Known Member

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    Buy the Captivate of wait for Dual CPUs (1GHz)?
    Buy the Dual CPU (1GHz) or wait for Dual CPU (1.5 GHz)?
    Buy the Dual CPU (1.5 GHz) or wait for Quad CPU (2 GHz)?
    Buy the 45 nm chips or wait for 230 nm fab?
    Buy the 7" tablet or wait for the 10"?
    Buy the fresh fish or wait for the new catch?
     
  18. Autolysis

    Autolysis Well-Known Member

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    You know, if you waited a few more months past the dual cores... The tri cores will be just on the horizon... But, you should wait another few months because the quad cores will be coming out sometime, too.
     
  19. novagator

    novagator Well-Known Member

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    I'm gonna go ahead and call BS on this one. Maybe not on your part, but definitely on Motorola's.
     
  20. Autolysis

    Autolysis Well-Known Member

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    Ghz is a horrible indicator for speed.

    Look up the 3.5 Ghz P4's that would get slammed by 2.0Ghz AMD's back in the day. :D
     
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  21. rfound

    rfound Well-Known Member

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    Its only a horrible indicator if you're looking at different architectures. If the chip architecture is very similar, then clock speed is an almost perfect means of comparison.

    Yes, P4s with Netburst performed very little work per clock than Athlons at the time, or chips of today... but a 3Ghz P4 Netburst would be just about 50% faster than a 2Ghz P4 Netburst (assuming the same cache, etc...)
     
  22. Breakmyfootoff

    Breakmyfootoff Active Member

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    If you want to have the newest tech all the time you're going to have to spend money. Get the Captivate now, but keep your old phone handy as a backup. When the next thing comes out that you want just sell the still relatively new Captivate and use the money from that (plus a little extra) to buy the new phone full retail. You can go back to your old phone for a few days while you wait for your new one if you have to :)
     
  23. ConceptVBS

    ConceptVBS Well-Known Member

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    Even if you have a dual core processor, there wont be any software that fully support it.


    Analogy:

    It's like building a brand new building with state of the art facilities, but no one is living in it.
     
  24. EarlyMon

    EarlyMon The PearlyMon Moderator

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    Multi-core processors for Android - in my opinion only - isn't a case of if, but rather - when.

    I personally segregate this all into Theory and Reality, kinda like this -

    Theory:

    In reality, our phones' processors are _insanely_ advanced - they're all system-on-a-chip (SoC) devices - they contain a CPU core, a GPU core, and then (depending upon model) a digital signal processing (DSP) core, an image signal processing (ISP) core, and various components such as hardware accelerators and so forth.

    Think of almost a motherboard on a single chip and you've got the idea. So - the integration is already there, and as manufacturing processes continue to spiral downward in scales for higher power efficiency, increased speed - or a little of both - the challenge of adding just another CPU core isn't as great as it once may have been.

    We care about performance (fill in the blank what that word means, you can't be wrong in my book on your version) and _battery lifetime_ (so well noted already in this thread) with our phones.

    OK - so we have this fancy OS - Android - using the Linux pre-emptive multitasking model - and no matter how you slice it (no pun intended (or taken, I'm sure)) things just bottleneck when you hit the one-thing-at-a-time CPU core.

    Suppose - and I'm simply pretending - suppose you had one CPU core that merely ran the supervisory details and management functions - and the other CPU core just happened to run everything else (so that part of the second one is just like what your single core CPU does today on your phone). So rather than fancy parallel processing model - we suppose a model with one core being the dedicated supervisor to the system and the application and service multitasking in the other core - kinda much simpler. Now, hold that thought.

    One WAY COOL feature of our mobile SoC processors is that they're _variable speed_ devices. They dynamically speed up and slow down, depending on the application / service load at any given time - with a simple target: as the phone needs to do more, it never seems to lag - and when it needs to do less, no power is used running the processor at constant speed and then just wasting that power as wasted heat (that's what your desktops and laptops are doing right now - but not your cool, mobile, super SoC stuff).

    Now - put together that supervisor idea in a separate core - with the variable speed thing - and smaller, more efficient devices - what _MIGHT_ that add up to is:


    • More efficient multitasking - equaling - higher performance from the USER point of view, not just some benchmark
    • More efficiently controlled multitasking - equaling - even better speed control for that performance - equaling - even LESS wasted battery power

    And HOW much in the way of new software might be required to accomplish that? Hold on to your hat - pretty much just the kernel and a few other modules.

    Would that be the most theoretically efficient dual-core design? No.

    Could that be done and could that represent a great leap forward in battery life with a big performance increase? Theoretically - you betcha!

    Reality:

    This part is simple. Especially because I freely admit to not knowing - but I can point out a few things and let you decide what matters.


    1. OK - anyone who's rooted and tinkered around knows that a kernel mod can increase performance - or battery - or some combination of the two.
    2. We've all seen about a zillion internet threads arguing processor merits one over the other - if you haven't - google my name, because I participate in some of them. ;)
    3. While we _think_ we know what the present processors can do and which one is king of the heap - we really don't know that. With the exception of the superior OpenGL performance of the Hummingbird processor, name me a phone, and I'll find you a custom kernel mod with a mind-staggering set of _valid_ benchmark results that will change what you think you know.
    4. The point? The big-iron phone makers supply VERY safe, very pedestrian kernels. They do a great job, but that's it. The power of the single cores we're already running is locked away unless you want to tinker and tinker to hit extraordinary.
    5. So - with even the simple architecture I describe in my theory section - the big iron phone makers could distribute near-extraordinary performance with just a little more than a safe, pedestrian approach.

    BUT - will they?

    Maybe yes, maybe by next year - and maybe never.

    The big iron phone makers never cease to amaze me at how cool they can be - ditto on the Android devs, both for the OS and the apps. Your Galaxy-class phone is proof of that (as are their competitors, honestly).

    They also never cease to amaze me on dumb some of their mistakes can be - give it up, c'mon - we all _know_ that's true - yes?

    I remember hating the first dual-core CPUs for desktops - we were early adopters - they were pricey, and in many applications (Murphy's Law - the ones we cared about at our company) were doggier than the sleek single core models we knew and loved.

    But - over time - that improved and now I wouldn't consider anything below a Core 2 Duo in my laptop.

    I think that's the deal coming with phones.

    But - I could be very wrong on this. I often am.

    And a PS for what it's worth - I work in the semiconductor industry and I have been a kernel developer (not for phones!) in an earlier part of my career. And - I'm not associated with anyone and have nothing to profit in any way by however this turns out - and no insider info was used in the making of this post. Sometimes - I just like to talk about theories.

    Thanks for reading - and if I've helped understanding in any way whatsoever, then that's made this post twice as much as fun for me.

    I used a lot of your space, gang - sure hope this contributes to your discussion.
     
  25. shorty920

    shorty920 Member

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    It'll probably be a year before there's a sweet new Dual-Core phone out, so if I were you, I'd just get a Captivate for now and be happy. It's only one of the fastest phones on the market with arguably the best screen.
     

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