1. Download our Official Android App: Forums for Android!

Root Real Programming

Discussion in 'Android Devices' started by Bankswood, Apr 1, 2011.

  1. Bankswood

    Bankswood Android Expert
    Thread Starter
    Rank:
    None
    Points:
    128
    Posts:
    1,066
    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2010

    Aug 23, 2010
    1,066
    82
    128
    Charlotte
    Mods, my apologies for being off topic but I thought the guys who hang around the root section would get a kick out of this.

    I am always amazed at the programming talent of so many of you and how young so many of you are. It seems our devs and true problem solvers have to work their majic around class schedules.

    Bear with me while I relay a story of how we use to do it. In the mid 70's I had to take a programming course as a degree requirement for my BA (not in computer science). It was called FORTRAN 4. Anyone heard of the language. Back then there were two main languages FORTRAN and COBALT. We who were not going any further in computer science took FORTRAN 4. Mostly it taught use how to be "literal" when we designed programs, how to flow chart, and write a small program. Our programs were full of "what if", "If, then" and "do loop" statements.

    To write a program, we first flow charted it, then wrote the lines of programming, "we didn't use the phrase code back then". We actually wrote each line out on paper. No one had a computer back then, hell the one the university had was the size of a classroom and cost $500,000.

    Once our program was written we then entered the computer lab and sat down at a key punch machine. We typed each line of programming on a punch card. After we finished we would check the cards for "hanging chads". Ha, you thought that was a Bush vs. Gore thing.

    We would then fill out a request sheet to run our program. I don't remember how often they ran programs but you could only pick up your finished program twice a day. 10:00-10:30 and 4:00-4:30. I can remember my heart pounding when they brought you your program. If your punch cards were wrapped by a single sheet of green and white stripped computer paper that meant the program failed. If the program failed the sheet would indentify the line of code where your program stopped. Also some wise ass in the department thought it was funny to have the phrase "BAD JOB" print all over the paper.

    You then had to identify the error, most of the time it was logic or a typo, retype the bad punch card and resubmit your cards for another run. Now understand that when the computer identified an error it stopped at that point. If there happen to be another error 5 cards later you would not find out until you picked your cards up again. I think the system was designed this way to discourage idiots like me from pursuing a career in computer science.

    If you were finally lucky enough to have a successful run you would get your cards and computer printout back. It would include input data, programming lines (normally 150 -300 lines), and your results or answers.

    Now that was Real Programming LOL!
     

    Advertisement

    scary alien, Aggie12 and tom108 like this.
  2. binary visions

    binary visions Android Expert
    Rank:
    None
    Points:
    413
    Posts:
    3,334
    Joined:
    May 14, 2010

    May 14, 2010
    3,334
    1,443
    413
    God bless cheap and powerful microprocessors, eh?
     
  3. mcapozzi

    mcapozzi Android Enthusiast
    Rank:
    None
    Points:
    43
    Posts:
    323
    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2010

    Mar 17, 2010
    323
    35
    43
    Computer SuperGenius aka Systems Administrator
    Liverpool, NY
    This post should be titled, "How-To Make a Career Out of Writing 10 Programs".

    Also the other language was COBOL (COmmon Business-Oriented Language).

    COBOL and FORTRAN are still in use to this day, although we no longer have to use the punch cards.

    -Mike
     
  4. Bankswood

    Bankswood Android Expert
    Thread Starter
    Rank:
    None
    Points:
    128
    Posts:
    1,066
    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2010

    Aug 23, 2010
    1,066
    82
    128
    Charlotte
    Thanks Mike, but what is the 10 programs about?
     
  5. mcapozzi

    mcapozzi Android Enthusiast
    Rank:
    None
    Points:
    43
    Posts:
    323
    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2010

    Mar 17, 2010
    323
    35
    43
    Computer SuperGenius aka Systems Administrator
    Liverpool, NY
    10 would be the number of programs a developer could get done during their career, if we still had to use punch cards.

    -Mike
     
    Bankswood likes this.
  6. Aggie12

    Aggie12 Android Expert
    Rank:
    None
    Points:
    163
    Posts:
    1,682
    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2010

    Jul 19, 2010
    1,682
    429
    163
    student
    Planet Earth
    haha that's hilarious. I couldn't imagine that. Thanks for sharing!
     
  7. dimitri407

    dimitri407 Well-Known Member
    Rank:
    None
    Points:
    38
    Posts:
    239
    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2010

    Jul 21, 2010
    239
    16
    38
    IT
    Orlando, Fl
    That would be the age of the sneaker network.
     
  8. binary visions

    binary visions Android Expert
    Rank:
    None
    Points:
    413
    Posts:
    3,334
    Joined:
    May 14, 2010

    May 14, 2010
    3,334
    1,443
    413
    Hey hey, now... I still use Sneakernet on occasion :D
     
  9. alprazolam

    alprazolam Android Expert
    Rank:
    None
    Points:
    143
    Posts:
    1,722
    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2009

    Dec 31, 2009
    1,722
    194
    143
    Now that is classic!
     
  10. scary alien

    scary alien not really so scary
    Moderator
    Rank:
     #8
    Points:
    2,138
    Posts:
    22,290
    Joined:
    Mar 5, 2010

    Mar 5, 2010
    22,290
    23,628
    2,138
    Male
    space alien ;)
    Indy
    lol, I'm old enough to have experienced all that the Op, Bankswood, related to us in the first post.

    My first exposure to computers came in 1974 in Heidelberg, Germany. Our American high school (on the army base my step-dad was stationed at) was in a an old, converted German hospital and there was a room with 8 teletype machines connected to an InterData mini-computer. Programming was in BASIC and we kept our program (Star Trek (simulator), Hammurabi (earliest version of Sim City), banner programs, etc.) on punched paper tape :eek: :D [I still kick myself for throwing those out]. I do still have some old teletype printouts from that time, though ;).

    Some of my classmates got to travel to Darmstadt to attend a special computer class where they got to use the "new" technology of 8-inch floppy disks ;).

    It wasn't until I was a junior in HS back here in the states that I got exposed to the wonderful world of IBM and the aforementioned punched cards via COBOL '74 and RPG II programming.

    I've dabbled in a myriad of other languages (and computer systems) over the years: FORTRAN, Prolog, Pascal, PL/I, C, Lisp, Scheme, Monk (bonus points to anyone on this board that can claim to have programmed in Monk :p), Tandem TAL, Icon, IBM assembler, Data General assembler, Business BASIC, Java, and probably a few others I've forgotten, lol. Plus, throw in where I spend a lot of time nowaday: ksh scripting on my Unix boxes at work.

    I'm still learning Java through my app development endeavors, so can't claim to know them as well as my real core languages of BASIC, C, TAL, and Monk. But its the journey that keeps me going and interested.

    Thanks for posting a thread that made some memories come flooding back.

    Cheers!
     
  11. Bankswood

    Bankswood Android Expert
    Thread Starter
    Rank:
    None
    Points:
    128
    Posts:
    1,066
    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2010

    Aug 23, 2010
    1,066
    82
    128
    Charlotte
    Funny thing is that the Fortran 4 class was probably the most helpful course I took in college. During my sales career I sold a form of life insurance and disabiltiy insurance to banks and they in turn sold the products to their loan customers. The product was so heavily regulated that it was basically a commodity so you needed to to do something special for the bank to get them to use your product. I taught myself Basic and BasicA and began writing loan programs for hand held computers (Sharp and Casio) mostly annuity, future value and loan amortization that made it easier for the banks to quote loans. They bought the hardware and I gave them the software. That took me a long way.
     
  12. colchiro

    colchiro Android Expert
    Rank:
    None
    Points:
    323
    Posts:
    8,886
    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2010

    Jun 4, 2010
    8,886
    1,784
    323
    Male
    Web developer/IT
    My first experience with computers was when one of my ham radio buddies, also a student at NDSU, printed up a ascii nudie (PG-13) picture using punch cards. :D

    COBOL was easy, try programming in RPG.

    After school, I jumped straight into Visual Fox Pro, and will eventually transition to .Net....
     
  13. scary alien

    scary alien not really so scary
    Moderator
    Rank:
     #8
    Points:
    2,138
    Posts:
    22,290
    Joined:
    Mar 5, 2010

    Mar 5, 2010
    22,290
    23,628
    2,138
    Male
    space alien ;)
    Indy
    lol...my first programming attempts in BASIC was with a ASCII banner program that would simply create banners on the continuous roll teletype print-outs.

    We actually did COBOL programming in high-school along with RPG II. A few years after HS, I used a table-driven language for work for our hospital's computer interfaces (that was very similar to how RPG worked).

    :)
     
  14. colchiro

    colchiro Android Expert
    Rank:
    None
    Points:
    323
    Posts:
    8,886
    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2010

    Jun 4, 2010
    8,886
    1,784
    323
    Male
    Web developer/IT
    Fixed field programming sucked.

    Self-taught basic on TRS-80 w/ cassette, my first computer. O/C'd it 50% to speed up the cassette. 100% wasn't reliable. Even installed a HiRez card that improved the graphics. :D
     
  15. faber78

    faber78 Guest
    Rank:
    None
    Posts:
    0
    Joined:

    that was a good read :)
     

Share This Page

Loading...