1. Are you ready for the Galaxy S20? Here is everything we know so far!

Teach cat to shut door

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by Rgarner, May 8, 2020.

  1. Rgarner

    Rgarner Android Expert
    Thread Starter

    Yeah, I know, but if they can train dogs, why not? He wanders around and barges in and out, day or night, when it's more annoying. I just want him to be more polite and thoughtful.
     


    MrJavi likes this.

    1. Download the Forums for Android™ app!


      Download

       
  2. mikedt

    mikedt 你好

    It's impossible to train cats, except when it comes to food, otherwise they'll do what they like.

    Why do you think you never see cats been used as service animals?
     
    ocnbrze and MrJavi like this.
  3. mikedt

    mikedt 你好

    We've got a few moggies on the school campus. They're not supposed to wander into the buildings, but they do sometimes.

    Good luck with training them to close doors...ha!
    Screenshot_20200509_093831_com.android.gallery3d.jpg Screenshot_20200509_093816_com.android.gallery3d.jpg

    The school keeps them because they catch rats and mice.
     
    #3 mikedt, May 8, 2020
    Last edited: May 8, 2020
    Rgarner, ocnbrze and MrJavi like this.
  4. no one

    no one Android Expert

    You can train a cat. But cats don't care. They're certainly smart enough, they lack the empathy to even consider you anything other than toy for their amusement though.
     
    dontpanicbobby and Rgarner like this.
  5. Rgarner

    Rgarner Android Expert
    Thread Starter

    I mean an inside door. It'd be great to install a pet door on the inside, huh? Then we could just lock the regular (indoor) one.
     
    MrJavi likes this.
  6. mikedt

    mikedt 你好

    Yeh you can train a cat where to find it's food, and where it should take a crap(with litters). But that's about it.
     
    Rgarner and MrJavi like this.
  7. olbriar

    olbriar  
    Moderator

    My cat uses the toilet but it is entirely her idea. She knows how to behave around people but beyond that I've never had any luck training her to do anything. As near as I can tell, she has me trained. :)
     
    Rgarner and MrJavi like this.
  8. dontpanicbobby

    dontpanicbobby 100% That Guy
    VIP Member

    My nephew trained his cat to do everything a dog can except tracking and retaining people.
    I have no idea how he did it but he did.
    Must be a random superpower.
     
    Rgarner likes this.
  9. Rgarner

    Rgarner Android Expert
    Thread Starter

    There's a superpower I could really use. Maybe some day I'll run into the right spider. Meanwhile, I guess I'll just have to find Karen Pryor.
     
    MrJavi likes this.
  10. MoodyBlues

    MoodyBlues Compassion is cool!
    VIP Member

    I saw a cat on the news recently, whose owner taught her to close a door. So, yes, it's possible. Cats are very intelligent and can be trained to do all sorts of things.

    For example, my big boy, Big Brian, was a tomcat who appeared in my backyard one day. I ran in and got him some food and water. Repeat for the next day. On the third day I picked him up and took him inside. I closed off the back part of the house to keep him away from my other cats until my vet gave him a clean bill of health. [He turned out to be FIV+, but that's not a threat to the other cats.] My vet guessed him no younger than 5, perhaps as old as 10. He had been an outdoor tomcat for X years.

    With patience and consistency, I potty-trained him, stopped his spraying, stopped his aggressiveness to other cats, AND taught him a trick! My cats love Temptations [treats], and I taught Big Brian to tap my hand to reveal the Temptations inside. When my grandsons were younger, they got such a kick out of clasping a handful of Temptations, calling Brian over, saying 'use your hand, Big Brian!' and then having him eat out of their hands. :D

    To this day, that's how he gets his snacks. It was super easy to teach. I just used the same methods I used when training my Great Danes for 40 years: positive reinforcement, calm demeanor, praise, patience and consistency. Try it!
     
    Rgarner and tommo47 like this.
  11. dontpanicbobby

    dontpanicbobby 100% That Guy
    VIP Member

    Will he sit?
     
    Rgarner likes this.
  12. Rgarner

    Rgarner Android Expert
    Thread Starter

    He sits, but if you mean on command, not really. He shows up if called maybe half the time. Sometimes he seems to be hanging around me, but I'm not sure if that's really the case or he just wants to be in a comfortable spot, e. g. on a bed, paper, etc.
     
    dontpanicbobby likes this.
  13. muddlemand

    muddlemand Member

    A friend of mine taught her cat to sit.

    Hi folks, by the way. Couldn't resist a cat thread.
     
  14. muddlemand

    muddlemand Member

    I have taught mine "I'm closing the door!" but I'm not entirely sure she isn't obeying. She's just reluctant to be shut out. But it is the phrase she recognises, not just the context.

    She definitely likes to hang out with me. It's taken me a year to be sure I wasn't imagining it. When I go outside and she's nowhere to be seen, within minutes she'll turn up to sunbathe next to me. She also likes to come on short walks with me. These are trained, of course, all her own doing.
     
    Rgarner and MrJavi like this.
  15. no one

    no one Android Expert

    Unless a cat finds an advantageous benefit to your game, it won't play.
     
    Rgarner likes this.
  16. MoodyBlues

    MoodyBlues Compassion is cool!
    VIP Member

    Praise and love are advantageous benefits! They've worked for me for *cough* more than *cough* 55+ years. :D

    Big Brian was rewarded with nothing more than positive reinforcement, praise, and love when I potty-trained him. A 10(?)-year-old, formerly outdoor, tomcat, learned to potty in litter boxes--ONLY--with no tangible reward. Just love. :)
     
    Rgarner likes this.
  17. no one

    no one Android Expert

    That is what I'm saying. The cat gets something beneficial from the situation, so it plays along. Cats can be trained, they just have to motivated correctly.
     
    Rgarner likes this.
  18. muddlemand

    muddlemand Member

    Same with dogs, though. Many dogs never quite get it and you have to have treats handy in your pocket for their whole lives. The difference with cats is that approval isn't their highest motivation. Dogs are pack animals and hate to feel ostracised. Like humans in that respect.

    Which also can be trained, though it's a tad more complicated.
     
    Rgarner likes this.
  19. MoodyBlues

    MoodyBlues Compassion is cool!
    VIP Member

    In my experience, it was never necessary to bribe a dog with treats for life. And, believe me!, when you're talking about dogs who weigh close to 200 pounds, they must be well trained.

    Every one of my dogs--not just Great Danes, but mutts, too--learned obedience through the methods I've previously mentioned. Sure, I used treats along the way, but never as their sole, or even primary, reward. Praise, hugs, and positive reinforcement made up about 80% of their training rewards, tidbits of treats about 20%.

    It was imperative that they obey...or many bad things could've happened. You know dogs who jump up at you to say hello? Guess what happens when a 185-pound dog does that to someone not expecting it! :eek:
     
    dontpanicbobby and Rgarner like this.
  20. MoodyBlues

    MoodyBlues Compassion is cool!
    VIP Member

    Sorry, I got the impression you meant tangible rewards, like treats. :)
     
    Rgarner likes this.
  21. no one

    no one Android Expert

    [​IMG] this guy:
    That is what I'm saying. The cat gets something beneficial from the situation, so it plays along. Cats can be trained, they just have to motivated correctly.

    [​IMG] Moodyblues:
    Sorry, I got the impression you meant tangible rewards, like treats

    Perhaps I wasn't being clear where I was coming from.
    All I am getting at is that cats can be trained. It just needs to be worth their while.
    Dogs, on the other hand, want to be your best friend every second, of every minute, of every hour, of every day, of every, everything, and they will do what they think will make you happy. Cats are not so easily swayed by the hollow charms of humans.
     
    Rgarner likes this.
  22. muddlemand

    muddlemand Member

    Having always trained them so well, that's probably why you haven't needed to carry on treating them. :cool:

    The only dog I ever had, I didn't meet till she was five, and I wasn't fully fit, so we never made it to perfect.
    I like to think that if I'd had her from puppyhood, and had my full health at the time, she'd have been a perfectly behaved dog. I've always known it's the owner/handler that needs to be trained more than the dog!
    She was very, very good but she (we) never got the hang of recall. She was a lurcher; I was on a lurcher/greyhound forum and everyone agreed they were selective about when to take notice - but I always thought, their temperament is so gentle that they won't become aggressive or pester for attention, so no significant problems, if they aren't thoroughly trained, so owners that don't get why training matters will never be forced to wake up to the reasons for it. I'm sure that's why the community generally saw things that way. Greyhound blood really does seem to mean a different companionship experience. They're very easy dogs to be lazy about.

    I know!! my neighbours have four: St Bernards and Newfoundlands. They're very well loved, and very lovable, but about as well trained as your average tiny dog (a dig at owners, not the breed!). I'd hate to be a cyclist passing as those affectionate dogs leap over the wall to say hello...!
     
    Rgarner and MoodyBlues like this.
  23. MoodyBlues

    MoodyBlues Compassion is cool!
    VIP Member

    Got it! :D
     
    Rgarner likes this.
  24. MoodyBlues

    MoodyBlues Compassion is cool!
    VIP Member

    I hear you. :) It's definitely easiest to train a brand-new puppy, but I've learned it is possible to teach an old dog new tricks.

    My current example is my helper's dog, who joined my household ≈3 years ago. As with most adult rescues, her true age is unknown, but she was believed to be ≈12 when she moved in, so she's ≈15 now.

    She's very good and well-behaved, except that she was always allowed to jump up at people. Granted, at only ≈50 pounds, it's not as catastrophic as with a big dog, but I'm still unsteady on my feet and really just can't have her doing that. From the get-go, I went back to my trusty old bag of tricks and gently taught her not to jump on me. No training treats involved.

    Separate from that, I've also taught her a new phrase and routine. Last thing at night she comes to my room, I say "bedtime snack?!", she lies down, then I hand her a chew...thing. [They vary daily, but keep her busy gnawing for 3-10 minutes.] She learned that in less than two weeks! :D
     
    Rgarner likes this.
Loading...

Share This Page

Loading...