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Verizons Policy on Rooted Phones

Discussion in 'Android Devices' started by Ninthwonder, Feb 1, 2010.

  1. Ninthwonder

    Ninthwonder Well-Known Member
    Thread Starter
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    Dec 17, 2009
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    anyone know what it is?
     

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  2. icstars989

    icstars989 Android Enthusiast
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    I would imagine the same as Apple and Jailbreaking.
     
  3. raremage

    raremage Well-Known Member
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    I'm not sure that would be true. Rooting Android is pretty well supported by Google for development purposes. Rooting an iPhone is never supported by Apple. I don't think AT&T ever said anything negative about jailbroken iPhones - only Apple.
     
  4. shademar

    shademar Well-Known Member
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    From Motorola's Droid Warranty, under exceptions:

     
  5. colnago

    colnago Android Expert
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    That's kinda' like saying that Intel should replace a fried processor, due to overclocking, because there are companies that offer improved cooling for overclocked chips.

    I would think that Verizon would view someone seeking warranty exchange, after installing/modding a Droid, and in a manner, or with software, not accessed via accepted means (Verizon, Motorla, Google, or Market), the same way that a car manufacturer would view someone adding a turbo to a normally aspirated engine...and then blowing their motor. I doubt it would be covered under warranty.

    However if someone bricks their phone by "rooting" or "over-clocking", and expects Verizon to provide a replacement by default..."good luck with that".
     
  6. Fabolous

    Fabolous Superuser
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    The Droid that I sent back to Verizon had a hardware defect -- loose headphone jack.

    I did a pretty messy job of hiding my root (factory wipe, but my framework-res was still modified). Haven't heard anything from them yet, heh, keeping my fingers crossed.

    Of course, now I know how, so if I ever have to send back a phone, it'll be completely stock.
     
  7. kennyidaho

    kennyidaho Android Enthusiast
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    Take a guess
    Do you guys think any company even has the resources to sit and check phones for crap like this? From what I have heard from different carriers and companies and my own personal experience I believe that it goes a little something like this:

    If it comes in for a hardware defect they check the water damage indicators, check the hardware and repair as needed, flash the phone and put in line to be shipped out as a replacement.

    If it comes in for a software issue they check the water damage indicators, check the hardware and repair as needed, flash the phone and put in line to be shipped out as a replacement.
     
  8. colnago

    colnago Android Expert
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    Yeah, but that's different than someone going thru this thought/action process:

    Day one: Hmm, I'm glad I got a Droid today.
    Day two: Hmm, I'm glad there is a Droid forum that I registered for.
    Day three: Hmm, I'll start a thread asking someone to explain what "rooting" is.
    Day four: Hmm, my phone isn't working after I rooted. Let me go ahead and just get a replacement from Verizon.
     
  9. radikal

    radikal Android Expert
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    yeah, i am pretty sure vzw would just flash it after fixing it, not check for root haha. really doubtful. i unrooted mine to the best of my knowledge before sending it back
     
  10. andadroid

    andadroid Member
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    What about warranty vs insurance? I can't imagine standard warranty would cover much of anything root-related. That's for manufacture defect. But I thought insurance was applicable to user abuse. At least that's what they told me.
     
  11. altimax98

    altimax98 Android Enthusiast
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    Geico Insurance Agent
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    I would think that if your rooted and your camera dies, or your speaker stops working they would cover it no problem... but if you cook your processor your up craps creek... BUT amd has a policy where they can replace a fried cpu chip as long as the voltage wasn't bumped, and if our overclocked phones aren't messing with voltage we might get it covered....... but I wouldn't test that theory :)
     
  12. Thoraldus

    Thoraldus Well-Known Member
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    I think Motorola's ace in the hole is their SmartReflex technology built into the OMAP3430. I have a feeling it going to be pretty hard if not impossible to use any software methods to blow up that CPU. Now if you take a soldering iron to it ... ;)
     
  13. Fabolous

    Fabolous Superuser
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    Hey there! Good observation! The chip should shut itself down before it reaches any thermal level that will damage it.

    But do not credit Motorola, credit Texas Instruments!
     
  14. kennyidaho

    kennyidaho Android Enthusiast
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    Take a guess
    Yes it should but back in my desktop over clocking days I had several chips that should have shut down on their own.
     
  15. Thoraldus

    Thoraldus Well-Known Member
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    Motorola built the Droid ... they had to choose the parts wisely. ;)
     
  16. Thoraldus

    Thoraldus Well-Known Member
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    Depends on whether they had any 'anti scorch' circuitry/sw many still don't.
     
  17. Thoraldus

    Thoraldus Well-Known Member
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    To quote TI ...

    "The OMAP3430 boast the most advanced and effective power management techniques in the market. The chip makes exhaustive use of TI's SmartReflex technologies which include a broad range of intelligent and adaptive hardware and software techniques that dynamically control voltage, frequency and power based on device activity, modes of operation and temperature."
     
  18. drgonzo

    drgonzo Member
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    When I purchased the insurance plan for my Droid I specifically asked if water damage was covered and I was told yes. So I guess a last ditch effort if I bricked my phone so badly I couldn't cover my tracks would be to just drop it in a glass of salt water.

    Although that would seem like a waste of a factory refurb for someone else.
     
  19. Fabolous

    Fabolous Superuser
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    Yikes! Were they P4's, lol? Takes a lot of heat to kill a desktop CPU (70+ C)

    My Phenom II x4 940's clocked at a cool 3.8GHz right now and chillin' at 40C :D

    Still, I think technology has advanced enough that these mobile SoC's and even desktop chipsets/BIOS can prevent such an event.
     

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